Category Archives: Canada

Amid uncertain NAFTA future, lobster industry looks to other markets

President Donald Trump is known to be a steak kind of guy. But his threat to throw out the North American Free Trade Agreement is lending a whole new meaning to “surf and turf” for at least one lobster-processing plant in southwestern Nova Scotia. “Yes, we all watch the negotiations. Yes, we’re all concerned about what will happen,” said Robert MacDonald, president and general manager of Gidney Fisheries in Centreville, N.S. The U.S. is the largest consumer of lobster from the Maritimes, accounting for close to three-quarters of the roughly $2 billion this country exported in 2016, according to the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. click here to read the story 09:24

Bluefin tuna in P.E.I. are so hungry they no longer fear humans

Bobbing up and down on cold Atlantic waters, several fishermen toss scaly, silver mackerel overboard. It’s a delicious snack for a bluefin tuna — the largest species of tuna in the world, measuring more than six feet in length and weighing up to 1,600 pounds. The newcomer among them, a writer and ecologist, expects to spend the afternoon patiently waiting for a bite. Instead, the bluefin tuna here in North Lake, P.E.I. are so abundant and so hungry that within minutes their trademark yellow caudal finlets are circling the boat. click here to read the story 18:29

Fish Processing Icon Pat Quinlan Has Passed Away

Pat Quinlan, the co-founder of Quinlan Brothers, has passed away. Quinlan was born in Red Head Cove on November, 1929 – the youngest of seven children in the family of Patrick and Alice Quinlan. Throughout Pat’s life, he received many accolades and awards within the local community. However, it was as owner, manager, president and CEO of Quinlan Brothers Limited that Pat left his mark on the fishing industry of Newfoundland and Labrador. click here to read the story 10:44

DFO says changes at St. John’s facility a result of disconcerting spring protests

Those measures are a direct result of (Richard) Gillett’s protest, which began on April 13, and an earlier protest on April 7 when a group of protesting fishermen kicked in a window at the building’s main entrance and stormed inside the building. Jan Woodford, regional director of communications with Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Newfoundland and Labrador Region, confirmed Thursday a new security review was conducted as a result of the protests. “Yes, this review was carried out in response to an incident at the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Centre during which protesters forcibly gained access to the building,” Woodford said. click here to read the story 10:01

DFO looking at fines instead of charges for minor fishing offences

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) is seeking the public’s views on plans to expand the use of tickets for minor fishing infractions. The new ticketing regime would mean fixed fines for minor commercial and recreational fishing violations instead of charges and court appearances. click here to read the story We plan to expand our options for enforcing the following regulations: Pacific Fishery Regulations, Atlantic Fishery Regulations, Fishery (General) Regulations,  British Columbia Sport Fishing Regulations,  Newfoundland and Labrador Fishery Regulations, We want to expand our use of tickets for minor fishing offences. click here to read the notice 11:50

Department of Fisheries and Oceans installs security office, excavates hill where hunger strike held last spring

The hill is alive with the sound of an excavator at the start of the road leading to the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) headquarters in St. John’s where Twillingate fisherman Richard Gillett held an 11-day hunger strike in April. The site where Gillett pitched his tent is all mud now. According to a statement from DFO, the excavation and the security office are part of new security and safety protocols being implemented at the facility.,, Gillett’s hunger strike started on April 13 and his supporters caused a bit of disruption at times for people trying to enter and leave the facility. But that wasn’t the only protest action by fishermen in the spring that caused some concern for DFO officials. click here to read the story 21:08

New research shows wild salmon exposed to fish farms have ‘much higher’ rate of disease

Wild salmon exposed to open-net fish farms are much more likely to be infected with piscine reovirus (PRV) than those that don’t have that contact, a new study has concluded. The data also show that the virus makes it more difficult for wild salmon to swim upstream to their spawning grounds, which has major implications for the sustainability of the populations. “The government has to remove this industry from the key salmon migration routes or we risk the complete loss of wild salmon in this province,” said Alexandra Morton, lead author on the report and an outspoken advocate for wild salmon. click here to read the story 18:07

The effect of exposure to farmed salmon on piscine orthoreovirus infection and fitness in wild Pacific salmon in British Columbia, Canadaclick here to read the study

Ryan Cleary calls for federal investigation over rumours and allegations

Two fishermen in Cartwright are making accusations of backdoor dealings and foul play around a Labrador committee of harvesters. Curtis Heard says he’s spent the past two years trying to get answers from a shrimp allocation committee that he claims is breaking the rules to satisfy its own ends.  “This committee operates with no oversight,” said Heard. “They’re making criteria to treat themselves, and if they don’t meet that criteria they’ll still walk through it.” In 2003, as a way to offset the impact of declines in crab and cod stocks, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) established an allocation of northern shrimp for crab and cod harvesters from Cartwright to L’Anse au Clair. click here to read the story 14:43

PHOTOS: Craziest lobster contest stacking up entries

For the second year in a row, photos of weird-looking lobsters are flooding the Facebook Page of a local auto dealership. The pictures of the unusual crustaceans, mostly submitted by fishermen, are being entered in Murray GM’s Craziest Lobster Contest. Marketing manager Billy Mole says he’s noticed there are quite a few photos of out-of-the-ordinary claws. “Last year I noticed we were seeing a few that had some pretty funky claws with some extensions.,,  Last year the contest reached nearly half a million viewers, with entries from Hawaii, Ecuador and a fish market in Tanzania. 15 photo’s, click here to read the story 10:43

FFAW payback: FISH-NL supporters say union pressured DFO to close cod fishery

Well-know Grand Bank fisherman Wayne Meade accuses the FFAW-Unifor of being behind a recent federal Fisheries and Oceans decision to shut down the cod fishery in a small area of Fortune Bay because most inshore harvesters who were fishing there are FISH-NL supporters. “This was not a DFO decision because DFO doesn’t run the fishery, and hasn’t since the moratorium — the FFAW calls the shots,” says Meade, who’s publicly endorsed FISH-NL since it was organized in the fall of 2016. “Eighty to 90 per cent of the fishermen who were fishing that cod support FISH-NL, and it’s the FFAW getting back at us.” click here to read the press release 10:48

Clark’s Harbour wharf: Lobster landings looking good

It looks as though lobster landings have been holding their own for the first two weeks of the season, with estimates that the catch is on par with last year in Shelburne County. “We’re seeing about the same as last year,” said Clark’s Harbour lobster buyer Gary Blades. “Some fishermen are up, some are down.” For many fishermen the first hauling day of the season didn’t come until Nov. 30, after traps were dumped on Nov. 28. This was due to gale force winds on Nov. 29. The season opening had also been delayed by a day. After that, for the most part, the weather was cooperative. click here to read the story 14:29

Seaspan launches Canadian Coast Guard’s first Offshore Fisheries Science Vessel

The first large vessel to be designed and built under the Canadian National Shipbuilding Strategy (NSS) was launched at Seaspan Shipyards on December 8. ‘Sir John Franklin’ is the first of three offshore fisheries science vessels (OFSV) which will be operated by the Canadian Coast Guard. In 2011, the government of Canada selected Seaspan to be its non-combat shipbuilder as part of the NSS program. click here to read the story 09:44

4.5 tonnes of unmarked genetically modified salmon fillets sold in Canada

It appears Canadians were among the first diners in the world to eat a genetically modified animal — and they likely didn’t know it. U.S.-based AquaBounty Technologies said in a recent fiscal update about 4.5 tonnes of its fresh AquAdvantage salmon fillets were sold in Canada between April and June. The company got approval from Health Canada and the Canadian Food Inspection agency last year to sell the product. AquaBounty — which has a production plant in P.E.I. — did not say exactly where the salmon was sold. click here to read the story 16:20

This area of Canada is becoming known for its truly gigantic salmon

Ted Walkus may have made the catch of the year at Rivers Inlet, B.C. Walkus, a hereditary chief of Wuikinuxv First Nation, caught a salmon that makes the fish most of us see at the supermarket look like sardines. It was a 50-pound monster, nearly as tall as Walkus himself. Catching a fish this big isn’t a total anomaly in the area. Rivers Inlet is known as something of a lost world, one of the only places on Earth where massive Chinook salmon are born. The biggest-ever salmon caught in the area was an incredible 83.3 pounds. click here to read the story 15:50

LETHBRIDGE: Pulp friction grips Pictou once again

Pictou County is a community torn asunder by the smell, foam and brown water of money. The controversy over Northern Pulp — known locally as “The Mill” — has been ripping apart families, neighbours and businesses. This is the toxic byproduct of economic output from the plant, and the jobs it generates in rural Nova Scotia. This week, wounds were ripped open again, as Northern Pulp announced a plan to pump effluent into the Northumberland Strait. The mill is facing a January 2020 deadline to replace the treatment facility at Boat Harbour. click here to read the story 15:08

Officials: Whales, After Deadly Year, Could Become Extinct

Officials with the federal government say it’s time to consider the possibility that endangered right whales could become extinct unless new steps are taken to protect them.,,,  The situation is so dire that American and Canadian regulators need to consider the possibility that the population won’t recover without action soon, said John Bullard, the Northeast Regional Administrator for NOAA Fisheries.  click here to read the story 09:39

There’s something wrong with cod

It will be another decade maybe, research shows, before harvesters can fish codfish commercially. It’s already been a quarter century since we’ve been able to fish cod commercially. Something is not right here. There has been ample time for cod to be back to commercial status with the minimum amount of cod that has been taken out of the system by Newfoundlanders and Labradorians. Why aren’t the cod stocks improving? Is it because of predators of cod and cod larvae, or is it due to seismic work for oil that is killing the food of cod and cod larvae? Is it poor science on cod stocks, and they really don’t know what’s out there? Is it because of foreign overfishing,,, click here to read the story 20:21

Fish-NL survey nets only two of three responses from by-election candidates; Liberal frontrunner refuses to make specific commitments

The Federation of Independent Sea Harvesters of Newfoundland and Labrador (FISH-NL) reports that two of three candidates from the mainstream political parties in the upcoming federal byelection in Bonavista-Burin-Trinity have responded to a survey on major fishery issues in the riding. Liberal candidate Churence Rogers and Conservative runner Mike Windsor issued responses, while New Democrat Tyler Downey failed to do so. “The fishery is critical to the future of Bonavista-Burin-Trinity, and the responses from Mr. Rogers and Mr. Windsor will give inshore fish harvesters, and the rural communities where they live, an indication of where the politicians and parties stand,” says Ryan Cleary, President of FISH-NL. click here to read the story 14:32

First Nation, fishermen distrust Northern Pulp wastewater treatment plan

There’s too much risk and not nearly enough trust to bring Northern Pulp’s plan for a new wastewater treatment facility to fruition, according to Andrea Paul, the chief of the Pictou Landing First Nation, and scores of fishermen and residents in Pictou County.,,, Concerned Northumberland Strait fishermen met with the company on Monday and two public consultations were held on Tuesday and Wednesday.,,, Speaking on behalf of the Northumberland Fisheries Association, lobster fisherman Allan MacCarthy said the Monday meeting did not offer any answers. click here to read the story 10:42

Say “No” to Slave Shrimp

The Thanksgiving-Xmas-NYE season, at our house as at many others, is marked by several traditional holiday foods, including shrimp. To procure the shrimp, we usually try to find the best price; shrimp, once a luxury good, now seems pretty much a commodity product. We used to buy shrimp based largely on cost. Lately, however, we’re scrutinizing labels more carefully and digging a little deeper in our pockets. click here to read the story 08:48

No plan to feel sorry for himself, LeBlanc says after leukemia diagnosis

Federal Minister of Fisheries and Oceans Dominic LeBlanc has been diagnosed with leukemia, and plans to start treatment next week. Despite this, the long-time politician said he has no intention to spend time feeling sorry for himself. LeBlanc was diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia last April, he said in a statement Wednesday. He said it was discovered after a series of tests following an annual physical exam where his doctor detected an anomaly in his white blood cell count. click here to read the story 17:43

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 45ft. Guimond Lobster Boat, 510HP Volvo D11 Diesel

Specifications, information and 8 photos click here To see all the boats in this series, Click here 11:50

CB Island Fisheries nets Masset’s Entrepreneur of the Year Award

When C B Island Fisheries stepped up to process sport-caught fish this spring, it saved a half-dozen jobs from swimming away off-island. “They greatly expanded this year,” says Masset Mayor Andrew Merilees, who presented the award last week to CBI General Manager Al Frick. After 22 years in business, CBI is a “heartstone” business that goes to Masset’s origins as a fishing community, said Merilees, but this year they took a new and much-needed turn when Haida Wild, the only other fish processor in Masset, stopped handling sport-caught fish this spring. click here to read the story 18:37

Fishermen worry Northern Pulp treatment plan will create ‘dead zone’

Northern Pulp met with some of its toughest critics Monday as it opened public consultations on a new effluent treatment facility for the Pictou County pulp mill. Dustin MacKeil was one of dozens of skeptical fishermen invited for a private briefing by the company at the Pictou County Wellness Centre. “The lies from the government, the lies from Northern Pulp — how can you trust them? Their track record is no good at all,” said MacKeil. He believes the proposed outfall threatens several fisheries in the area. click here to read the story 09:56

Labour Board removes investigator assigned to FISH-NL’s certification application; entire process ‘a nightmare’

The Federation of Independent Sea Harvesters of Newfoundland and Labrador (FISH-NL) is deeply concerned that the investigator with the province’s Labour Relations Board assigned to its application for certification has been removed from the file almost a year after taking it on. “The process of reviewing our application has already taken far too long, and now it will most definitely take even longer,” says Ryan Cleary, President of FISH-NL. “This entire situation is a nightmare.” Read the official response from the Labour Board  click here to read the story,08:56

Major pattern change to cold begins at mid-week in the Mid-Atlantic region, assures a far different December compared to last five years

Overview – A major pattern change is going to begin on Wednesday in the Mid-Atlantic region and it will result in a period of sustained colder-than-normal temperatures that will assure a much different December compared to the last five. This pattern change to cold will also include increasing chances for snow – perhaps as early as late this week or during the upcoming weekend – as an active upper-level trough forms in the eastern US associated with the initial cold blast. Discussion – This December will be a far cry from the last five years,,, click here to read the story 17:59

Fraser River Sockeye salmon recommended for listing under Species At Risk Act

The recommendation, announced Monday by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada, an independent scientific body that advises the federal government, is the most significant acknowledgement to date of the jeopardy facing the iconic red-bodied fish that was once the mainstay of British Columbia’s salmon industry. “It’s a signal of a larger issue,” said Eric Taylor, committee chair and fish ecologist at the University of British Columbia. “The Fraser River is having trouble supporting these fish.” click here to read the story 14:37

Inland Fisheries: DNR proposes a study on the effect of commercial gill nets on Lake Michigan

The Department of Natural Resources has proposed a study of the impacts of commercial gill netting on non-target sport fish such as chinook salmon and brown trout in the Wisconsin waters of Lake Michigan. Commercial fishers in Zone 3 have lobbied the agency for the ability to use large mesh gill nets to catch lake whitefish. The gear has been prohibited in the zone, which covers the Wisconsin waters of Lake Michigan south of Bailey’s Harbor, to prevent bycatch and mortality of sport fish as well as user conflicts. However, large mesh gill nets are allowed for commercial fishing in northern Lake Michigan and part of Green Bay. Commercial fishers have requested the same opportunity in Zone 3. click here to read the story 15:11

How Newfoundland is grappling with the return of cod fishing

Tony Cobb is seated at his usual table at the Chester Fried Superstop, a roadside gas station and convenience store that serves some of the best fish and chips on Fogo Island.,, His ritual is interrupted every few bites by the coverall-clad fishermen who approach the table after paying for their gas. In baymen’s accents and with hands held chest high, they tell Mr. Cobb, whose new fish business offers the best price for top-quality northern cod in Newfoundland, about the huge, gleaming fish they’ve been catching. The late fall yields the best cod of the year, from “foxy” reddish ones to black-backed hulks. These are not fish tales, and Mr. Cobb is happy to banter. But when the fishermen turn away, his eyes darken: His mind has wandered out of the diner and into the bleak murk of fishery politics. click here to read the story 14:06

B.C. fish farms: a tangled net

Industrial fish farming began in British Columbia with a few small experiments in the 1970s. By the 1990s, it was operating like a well-oiled machine: Smaller farms had been swallowed by large conglomerates, and imported Atlantic salmon had become the preferred breed — the Herefords of aquaculture.,,, So, are fish farms bad? Federal research scientist Kristi Miller says she understands the frustration of not having a definitive answer. click here to read the story 09:43