Category Archives: Canada

Search for missing St. Lawrence fisherman continues a week after official search ended

The search for missing fisherman Issac Kettle continued on Thursday with the help of supply vessel Paul A. Sacuta, tug boat Keewatin and sonar equipment supplied by marine surveying company Fugro Geo-Surveys. Kettle remains missing after the fishing vessel Sarah Anne sank off the coast of St. Lawrence,,, Pike said there had been no news from the search effort ongoing throughout the day, noting the Paul A. Sacuta left St. John’s on Sunday night and has been searching the fishing grounds, about 23 miles from St. Lawrence, since arriving on Monday morning. Pike said the Keewatin joined the search on Wednesday. >click to read< 20:20

Criticism of federal handouts

I am living in a fishing town and the fishermen are fishing lobsters for a living. They are working hard trying to make a good living so they can pay their bills and support their families. Like everybody else, they have stress and they worry if they will be able to sell and get a good price for their labour. After reading the news about the province having a hard time finding labourers and immigrants having trouble to get into the province and work in the processing plants, I am stumped. We have unemployed students that could work these jobs but Ottawa — the way I read the news — will give them $2,000 a month,,, Simon LeMay,  >click to read< 13:49

Good Karma! Catching two coloured lobsters, one blue and one calico, comes days after child saved from drowning

A fisherman for 42 years, Gary Robichaud was out fishing lobster with his three sons, Alex, Zachary and Sylvain, when they found a blue lobster in a trap. After celebrating that catch, taking pictures and posing with the bright blue lobster they were even more surprised when 15 minutes later another rare coloured crustacean was found trapped inside another trap. The market sized lobster was calico coloured, another rare catch for the fisherman. Asked if this had ever happened before, Robichaud said no. “It’s never happened to me,” he said of catching two rare coloured lobsters on the same day. But Robichaud said he will take it all as signs of the good luck he’s been experiencing including how things fell into place during the rescue of a 10-year-old boy May 29. >click to read< 20:00

Bad lobster season affects everyone in Cape Breton

At this time of year, the local fishing wharfs are feeling the effect of the coronavirus on their bottom line. Lobster fishers are facing the reality of an overseas market that has dried up causing prices to plummet to an all-time low.,, When lobster fishermen have a bad year, everyone suffers. Car dealerships can’t count on the fishermen up-dating their trucks at the end of the season. Those new trucks will remain on the lot. The local fishermen are a generous group who give readily to local causes. You can’t give what you don’t have. A bad season affects us all. What can we do to help out? Start by eating more lobster. When lobster is cheaper than ground beef, now is the time to get a good feed. Treat yourself to lobster every week until the season is over. Order a few extra dozen and freeze for the Christmas season. By Yvonne Kennedy, >click to read< 16:08

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 42′ Provincial Lobster/Gillnetter, 3208TA Cat Diesel

To review specifications, information and 5 photos, >click here< Vessel is in good condition. To see all the boats in this series, >click here<13:04

“Prince of Whales” threatens lawsuit against Maine Lobstering Union members

Richard Max Strahan has threatened to sue the Maine Lobstering Union (MLU), the Maine Lobstermen’s Association (MLA) and their individual members for damages under the federal Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act. The statement was contained in papers Strahan filed Monday in the U.S. District Court in Bangor in a lawsuit he began last year under the self-styled name “Man Against Xtinction.” Naming the commissioner of the Department of Marine Resources and the assistant administrator of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) as defendants, the suit asked the court to rule that the decision by NMFS to allow the Maine lobster fishery violates the law governing federal administrative procedures and, consequently, the federal Endangered Species Act. >click to read< 11:40

Seal hunt proponents hope new evidence sways skeptical fisheries officials

Three new studies being prepared for publication suggest that recovered populations of seals and sea lions in west coast waters could be having an outsized impact on the survival of the three most troubled Pacific salmon species — chinook, coho and sockeye. “Most of the drop in survival of chinook and coho in the Georgia Strait since the 1980s is likely due to seals eating juvenile fish during their first summer in the ocean,” said Carl Walters, a professor emeritus at UBC’s Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries.  Estimates suggest that seals may be consuming about five million juvenile coho each year, or about half of the juveniles that enter the area from streams and rivers. Up to 15 million chinook juveniles meet the same fate, about one third of that population. >click to read< 09:21

Cape Breton lobster fishermen struggle – ‘This is the first year I had to tell my fishermen I couldn’t move their product,’

There is a lack of demand due to the COVID-19 pandemic. As a result, the price for lobster has dropped to $4.25 a pound. In some areas, buyers are restricting the amount they purchase from fishermen. Marlene Brogan, the manager of Ballast Grounds Fisheries, a lobster buyer in North Sydney, said they’ve had to tell fishermen they can’t buy their catch some days. “We’ve been in business 21 years and this is the first year I had to tell my fishermen I couldn’t move their product,” said Brogan. She said there have been many days the fishermen at their wharf haven’t gone out to fish. >click to read< 14:19

Photos & video: 2019-2020 lobster fishery comes to a close in southwest N.S.

The six-month 2019-2020 commercial lobster fishery in southwestern N.S. and along the province’s south shore came to a close on Sunday, May 31. Here is a look at some of the activity at the wharves a the Yarmouth Bar and in Pinkney’s Point in Yarmouth County. Here’s a few images from Yarmouth County on the last day on May 31. Photos and video by Tina Comeau. >click to read< 09:00

Tugboat, armed forces aircraft contributing to search for missing fisherman and F/V Sarah Anne

Several private companies and the Canadian Armed Forces have joined the search for a fishing vessel that went missing off the coast of St. Lawrence last week after the Canadian Coast Guard concluded its search Wednesday. R.J.G. Construction has partnered with marine surveying company Fugro GeoSurveys to find the Sarah Anne, as well as the lone missing crew member, Issac Kettle. For Andrew Perrot, the company’s vessel manager and a St. Lawrence native, the mission is personal. The company’s tugboat MV Keewatin is currently being outfitted with a winch and sonar and Perrot said he’s hoping to have it in the water and ready to go by Monday evening or Tuesday morning. >click to read< 18:17

‘You’re not making a whole lot of money but you’re making a little bit’ – Cheap lobster on P.E.I. is bittersweet

A P.E.I. lobster fisherman who couldn’t sell part of his catch on Saturday decided to pack his blue half-ton truck with lobster and head to the city to sell the once-lucrative crustaceans at a bargain price. At $3 for canners and $4 for markets, Tyler MacDonald had no trouble offloading the lobsters. He asked for 50 cents less than he was getting at the wharf for canners. Wayne and Janet Foy, a couple from Inkerman, drove nearly 40 kilometres to get a deal. The Foys said they’ve seen other people selling lobster out of their trucks for as much as $6.50 a pound.  “I’m here to get some live lobster, the price is really good,” said Janet. Wayne said it is sad to see fishermen being paid so little for their catch. >click to read< 13:26

Icicle Seafoods, Ocean Beauty Seafoods merge salmon processing operations operations

Two of Alaska’s largest seafood companies are merging their salmon processing businesses. Icicle Seafoods and Ocean Beauty Seafoods will be combining forces to create OBI Seafoods. Talks of a potential merger have been circulating for months. There’s been speculation in the seafood industry press that the two Seattle-based companies are seeking to remain competitive against the other major industry players in Alaska. The two companies have very different ownership. Half of Ocean Beauty is owned by the Bristol Bay Economic Development Corporation. The other is a small group of Outside investors. Icicle on the other hand was bought by privately-held Canadian giant Cooke Seafoods in 2016. The majority of — I don’t want to say majority — but a big chunk of the Alaska salmon processing sector is now partly owned or partly controlled by a major salmon farming company,” >click to read< 09:35

Leaving as soon as possible – Oil supply ship to resume search for missing fishing boat off St. Lawrence

MHA Carol Anne Haley says the province has secured a vessel to continue the search for the Sarah Anne, a fishing vessel that went missing off the coast of St. Lawrence last week. Haley, the member for Burin-Grand Bank, said she and the premier have worked to engage the Paul A. Sacuta, a supply vessel for the offshore oil industry, to help continue the search for Issac Kettle. Kettle is the lone crew member of the Sarah Anne who has not been found. The Sarah Anne, along with it’s four crew members, did not return to St. Lawrence after leaving to fish crab Monday morning. >click to read< 16:34

Lobster season off to good start says P.E.I. fisherman

Lobster catches are starting strong this season, but the industry continues to adapt to an unusual market, says one P.E.I. fisherman. “The catches have been good. The weather’s kind of up and down depending on the day,” said Charlie McGeoghegan of Pinette. “The prices are, well, they’re definitely lower than we feel they should be, but there is kind of a unique situation going on, compared to other years.” Market-sized lobsters are selling for $4.25 per pound while canners go for $4. It’s the price buyers committed to at the start of the season. Last year, the same lobsters would have fetched $7 and $6.50 per pound. “That’s about $100 million that’s gone out of the economy,” said McGeoghegan. >click to read< 11:54

F/V Sarah Anne: The deadly, relentless sea reminds us of the steep cost of fishing

I’ve long wondered how many people in North America, as they peruse the offerings at their supermarkets, specialty stores and menus, ever give much thought to the unseen, human cost behind their tasty seafood. Those who live close to the ocean know too well the perils that come with fishing. Those who don’t may never know.  This week, Newfoundland and Labrador felt that chill as St. Lawrence became the focus of a story that is both sadly and terrifyingly familiar. The Sarah Anne, a fishing boat with four men aboard, did not come back as expected Monday night with a load of crab, and indeed never came home at all. By John Gushue >click to read< 08:50

‘Nothing is normal’: LFA 34 & 33 lobster fishery draws to a close in southwest N.S.

The commercial lobster fishery in southwestern Nova Scotia and along the south shore, draws to a close May 31. Crews are bringing gear back ashore at the conclusion of a season that saw a promising start with catches and the price paid to fishermen, but then hit rough waters due to the coronavirus pandemic. “You wouldn’t believe the amount of people that are already hauled up. Some five days early or more,” said Yarmouth County fishing captain Shawn Muise, following a day of fishing on his vessel, Force Awakens, on May 29. “Nothing is normal.” “The season was going so well at the start. Finally the prices were reflecting the market. But when COVID started, and as the price started to drop, you could see it in the fishermen’s faces,” Lots of photos,  >click to read< 07:29

Big Bar Landslide: Concern over delays, contract cost as salmon populations face possible extinction

The federal NDP critic for fisheries is calling for more oversight of the cleanup project at B.C.’s Big Bar landslide following news of tripling contract costs and worker safety concerns. Construction giant Peter Kiewit Sons’ contract to clear the slide from the Fraser River was awarded in December at $17.6 million, but has since been amended more than a dozen times and is now worth more than $52.5 million. Earlier this month, three rocks fell unexpectedly from a slope above where crews have been working. It happened overnight and no one was hurt, but WorkSafeBC is now investigating. The Big Bar landslide dumped 75,000 cubic metres of rock into the Fraser in a remote area north of Lillooet some time in late 2018, but it wasn’t reported until June 2019. The landslide completely blocked migration routes for several salmon runs,,, >click to read< 12:14

A Fundraiser for The Men of St. Lawrence

Right now they’re is one beautiful woman who has lost her husband, son, and nephew in this tragedy. 3 other woman won’t get to see they’re husbands walk through the door. 6 kids have to grow up with out the support of they’re dads. So as I sit here thinking of my dear friend Scott and all the others, I can’t help but want to try and support they’re families as much as I can,,, Chris Cusick. >click to read< , and please, donate if you can! Thank you

Despite mother’s pleas, search efforts are over for missing St. Lawrence fisherman

After the deaths of three fishermen at sea, the southern Newfoundland town of St. Lawrence is in shock, while the mother of a missing fourth man is pleading with officials to continue a search for her son. The search for family friend Isaac Kettle ended 8:45 p.m. Wednesday night. But Kettle’s mother, Aundriette Kettle, said Thursday she wants extra equipment to find and raise the Sarah Anne from the ocean, as she believes her son’s body is still on the vessel. “Them other bodies were found, [but] my son is on that boat. He needs to be brought up, they [need] to get cameras, things like that, on that ocean to bring him up,” Kettle said. “Isaac needs to be home to us, his family.” >click to read< 14:32

Fishing less could be a win for both lobstermen and endangered whales – they never mention ship strikes

A new study by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) found that New England’s historic lobster fishery may turn a higher profit by operating with less gear in the water and a shorter season. The findings could provide a path forward for the lobster fishing industry, which is under pressure to move away from traditional pot fishing that uses long vertical lines of rope known to entangle and kill endangered North Atlantic right whales and other protected species. The study was published this week in the journal Marine Policy. “The story the data tells is optimistic,” says lead author Hannah Myers, a graduate student at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and a guest student at WHOI. “Entanglements often cause chronic injury, stress, and even starvation if the animal doesn’t immediately drown,” says Michael Moore, a coauthor of the paper and director of WHOI’s Marine Mammal Center. >click to read<  12:06

Most likely Carnival Cruise Lines is responsible for 18+ Right Whale deaths in the past 3 year, at which rate they would soon be extinct. – >click to read<

North Atlantic Right Whale: How to kill a species with Fake News, from National Geographic of all places! – >click to read<

Coast Guard Ends Search for Isaac Kettle, Missing St. Lawrence Fisherman

The Coast Guard officially wound down its search for the last victim of a boating tragedy in Placentia Bay last evening. Officials said after an intensive search spanning 650 nautical miles, they believe there will no longer be any reasonable chance of survival for the fourth crew member. Three bodies were recovered from the ocean off St. Lawrence on Tuesday. The incident has now been turned over to the RCMP as a missing persons case. The Coast Guard is thanking the many volunteers who joined the search effort, and they send their condolences to the loved ones of all four crew members aboard the Sarah Anne and the entire community of St. Lawrence. >click to read< 08:18

Fishermen lost off St. Lawrence remembered as ‘the finest kind of people’

Family and friends of three fishermen whose bodies were recovered off the coast of St. Lawrence, and one still missing at sea, are remembering them as kind and hard-working people. The search for family friend Isaac Kettle, believed to be in his early 30s, will end at 8:45 p.m. NT, according to the coast guard. All four men went missing in the mouth of Placentia Bay, off the southeast coast of Newfoundland,,, When they were not back before 8   p.m. that evening, a search and rescue mission began and the Canadian Coast Guard was called.,, Eric Reeves, a fisherman of 30 years, joined in the search for his friends. Around 7:30 a.m. Tuesday, he said, he found some items from the boat floating in the water. “We found a coffee mug belong to the skipper’s son and his name was wrote on it, and then we knew there was some tragedy happened,” said Reeves. “When you find something that you don’t want to find, I’ll tell ya, it’s heartbreaking.” >click to read< 18:13

St. Lawrence family, residents devastated by deaths of well known fishermen whom perished at sea

Eileen Norman broke down in tears as she spoke about the three St. Lawrence men, her family members who perished at sea. She was referring to her brother-in-law, Ed Norman, 67, his son Scott Norman, 35, and his nephew Jody Norman, 42, whose bodies were recovered Tuesday morning from the frigid waters off the coast of the Burin Peninsula on the province’s south coast. As of The Telegram’s deadline, one man was still missing, Isaac Kettle, who is said to be in his early 30s. The four men left St. Lawrence in Ed Norman’s 36-foot fishing vessel, Sara Anne, about 12:30 a.m. Monday to go crab fishing, Eileen Norman said. >click to read< 09:25

YouTube Cancels Michael Moore Produced Green Energy Documentary, “Planet of the Humans”

Finally, YouTube has found the flimsy pretext it needed to cancel the controversial Michael Moore-produced eco-documentary which has been infuriating greenies with its anti-renewables message: ‘copyright infringement.’ Planet of the Humans, the documentary executive-produced by Moore and written and directed by his friend Jeff Gibbs has racked up over 8 million views on YouTube since its launch last month. But now — in what Gibbs says is a “blatant act of censorship” — YouTube has taken down the video. Filmmaker Jeff Gibbs is surely correct when he says that YouTube’s cancellation of the documentary is politically motivated. >click to read<16:43

Michael Moore and Driessen agree! Wind, solar and biofuel energy are devastating Planet Earth – Never in my wildest dreams did I envision a day when I’d agree with anything filmmaker Michael Moore said – much less that he would agree with me. But this new film, Planet of the Humans, is as devastating an indictment of wind, solar and biofuel energy as anything I have ever written. The documentary reflects Moore’s willingness to reexamine environmentalist doctrine.  >click to read<

UPDATE: Bodies of three St. Lawrence fishermen recovered, one fisherman still missing off Newfoundland’s south coast

The Canadian Coast Guard has recovered the body of a third fisherman missing off the coast of St. Lawrence, and crews are still searching for one other missing man. One man’s body was found at 4:15 a.m. local time on Tuesday, the second man’s body was found at 11:15 a.m., and the third man’s body was found at 11:40 a.m. Crews continue their search and rescue mission this afternoon.  Five fishing boats are involved in the search, along with the coast guard vessel Ann Harvey, a Cormorant helicopter and a Hercules aircraft. >click to read< 14:24

One man still missing, search and rescue efforts continue – The bodies of Ed Norman, 67, his son Scott, 35, and his nephew Jody, 42, have been recovered off the province’s south coast following a marine accident that occurred after the men, along with an Isaac Kettle left the Burin Peninsula community’s harbour at 12:30 a.m. Monday. Kettle, thought to be in his early 30s, is still missing and search and rescue efforts to locate him are continuing. >click to read< 14:29

Stolen Grand Manan Boat Found In Maine

A possible joy ride into American waters causing shock and upset for a Grand Manan fisherman who discoved his lobster boat missing on Monday morning. Sherman Kinghorne of Special K Fisheries owns “Grampa’s Legacy” and he noticed the boat was gone about 4 a.m. as he was leaving to go fishing. “The vessel was not at the wharf. We thought someone may have been playing a prank. We looked to the wharf to the left of us, no vessel. At that point, we started calling RCMP, Fundy Coast Guard radio, Fundy traffic.” Kinghorne said.,, “It wasn’t 20-25 minutes after putting that call out, an American lobster boat spotted her.” Kinghorne said. >click to read< 12:10

UPDATED- Search Underway. Breaking: 1 body found, 3 still missing in search for commercial fishermen near St. Lawrence

The Canadian Coast Guard has recovered the body of a fisherman off the coast of St. Lawrence, and crews are still searching for three other missing men. The four men went missing in the mouth of Placentia Bay, after leaving from St. Lawrence shortly after midnight to fish crab, and were due back before 8 p.m. Monday evening, but did not arrive. “We found some debris in the water, and obviously the crew member, so we know whatever happened is tragic and probably happened quickly,” said Mark Gould, the regional supervisor at the Maritime Rescue Sub Centre in St. John’s. “But, y’know, we’re still searching. We’ll search until we’ve exhausted all measures and possibilities.” >click to read< 09:58

Three others still missing, search and rescue efforts underway  – “We’re in complete shock,” St. Lawrence’s assistant town clerk Eileen Norman,,, Her brother-in-law, Ed Norman, 67, went out in a 36-foot fishing boat with his son, Scott Norman, 35, and nephew, Jody Norman, 42. The other man, Isaac Kettle, is a friend in his early 30s, she said. >click to read<

Process local lobster first, say Val Comeau fishermen after devastating processing plant fire

Steve Ferguson said he wonders what will happen next as they wait to see if the buyer they deal with at Les Pêcheries de Chez-Nous factory will be able to help them out. While a large part of the plant was destroyed in a fire, a portion of the processing plant not damaged is set to resume processing lobster this week with about a third of the staff. The company said 331 people were working at the plant at the time of the fire, and 100 lobster fishermen sold their catch to the plant. Local fishermen want to make sure their catch will take priority over lobster being brought in from Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island.  “At the end of the day, if they can’t produce our lobster from here, why are they bringing so much from other provinces. >click to read< 15:15

‘A drink and a good yarn’: Neils Harbour man reveals the secrets to a life well lived, as he turns 100

Ron Ingram of Neils Harbour will celebrate a love of hard work, a life at sea and the occasional ‘nip of rum’ when he celebrates his 100th birthday later this month. It won’t be quite the celebration he’d hoped for. Ingram’s family had planned an open house. Ingram, who still lives on his own, was hoping people could drop by. Those visits from friends are what he misses most during the COVID-19 pandemic. Ingram moved to Neils Harbour, a small fishing village in northern Cape Breton, about 75 years ago. Born and raised in Grand Bruit, N.L., he started fishing when he was nine, according to daughter Kathy MacKinnon. He moved to North Sydney at 18. Newfoundland was part of the British Empire then, he said, and he had no choice but to continue fishing. photos, >click to read< and Happy Birthday, Ron Ingram!

Buyers setting catch limits, processors struggle with labour shortages, ‘Lots of lobster, but we can’t bring them in’

“Pretty good catches so far. But almost everybody’s on a quota right now,” said Gerard Whalen, a long-time fisherman in Naufrage in eastern P.E.I. “We’re seeing lots of lobster, but we can’t bring them in.” “We just can’t get rid of them,” added Lucas Lesperance, who docks a few boats down from Whalen. Lesperance said he’s pulled up about 1,000 pounds of lobster some days, but his buyer has only been accepting 600-700 pounds.  According to P.E.I.’s Seafood Processors Association, that is the big problem across the industry. Executive director Jerry Gavin said Island processing plants — which rely heavily on temporary foreign workers — are about 200 workers short this season. >click to read< 17:23