Category Archives: Canada

Millions of fire extinguishers recalled

Kidde, a manufacturer of fire suppression equipment, has recalled more than 40 million fire extinguishers equipped with plastic handles. Some of the units were manufactured more than 40 years ago. According to the federal Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), “The fire extinguishers can become clogged or require excessive force to discharge and can fail to activate during a fire emergency. In addition, the nozzle can detach with enough force to pose an impact hazard.” Millions of Kidde fire extinguishers are currently installed on pleasure and commercial fishing boats. click here to read the story  Product Safety Recall – This product recall involves two styles of Kidde disposable fire extinguishers click here   08:22

Is frozen cod just as good as fresh? Yes. As long as it is handled properly, new research reveals.

In Norway they say that nothing is in more of a hurry than a dead fish. This is probably true, because on average it takes three days for a fresh cod to reach most sales counters. And for both retailers and customers, a three-day-old fresh fish is stretching it a bit. However, if the fish is frozen on board the vessel and thawed properly before it reaches the sales counter, its quality can be just as good as if it had never seen the inside of a freezer. Just as long as the fishermen and fisheries industry take note of our research results. From fresh seasonal fish to a high-quality frozen product. click here to read the story 12:55

Boudreau family makes local shipbuilding history

The largest modern fishing boat ever manufactured on Isle Madame hit the water in October. Father and son duo Adolphe and Shawn Boudreau completed construction on the fishing vessel All Segments, which was purchased by the Everett family of Digby. The hulking 50-foot by 30-foot boat weighs in at 90 tonnes. click here to read the story w/photos 16:30

On This Day – November 4, 1991 – Swordfishing Boat Missing, Overdue

The Coast Guard continued searching today for a fishing boat due back in Gloucester last Friday from a trip to the Grand Banks off Newfoundland, Canada.  The 70-foot Andrea Gail was supposed to have returned to port by Saturday with its crew of six fishermen. Several Gloucester fishermen were said to be aboard the vessel, but Coast Guard officials were withholding crew members’ names this morning pending notification of their families. The vessel has not been heard from since Thursday when it was reported to be 180 miles east-northeast of Canada’s Sable Island.  The missing vessel was reported to be encountering 30-foot seas and 50 to 80-know winds kicked up by the northeaster that devastated coastal New England last week. click here to read the story 08:13

Nova Scotia Mi’kmaq vie for licence in lucrative Arctic surf clam fishery

Thirteen Nova Scotia Mi’kmaq bands have announced they are partnering with Clearwater Seafoods to seek a licence in the lucrative Arctic surf clam fishery, following a recent call by Ottawa for new entrants in a sector currently fished by Clearwater alone. The announcement of the “operational partnership” was made Thursday by Chief Terrance Paul, co-chair of the Assembly of Nova Scotia Mi’kmaq Chiefs.  click here to read the story 13:39

Atlantic and Quebec Indigenous Groups and Ocean Choice International Partner in Bid for Arctic Surf Clam Quota – About the Partners – click here to read the OCI press release

Insuring fishing boats in the Maritimes

Fishing and fishing vessels – these are things that are synonymous with the Maritimes. And where there’s industry, there is risk. And where there’s risk, there is insurance. To discuss the business of Eastern Canadian fishing insurance, Insurance Business spoke to Keith Amirault, vice president Fairway Insurance Services, based out of Digby, Nova Scotia. The industry is changing, Amirault said, with companies consolidating fishing programs for greater efficiencies. click here to read the story 12:00

Cape Cod fishermen have high hopes for halibut

On the U.S. side of the border Atlantic halibut are listed under the Endangered Species Act and fishermen are limited to one fish per trip. Less than a half a day’s steam to the east, the same fish is the poster child for sustainable fishery management and generates between $100 million and $200 million a year for Canadian fishermen. It’s a divergence shrouded in mystery as deep as the ocean on either side of the Hague Line, the boundary that separates the two nations out to the 200 mile limit of their exclusive economic zones. The target date to rebuild the U.S. Atlantic halibut stock to healthy levels is 2056, nearly 40 years in the future. click here to read the story 07:49

Prince Edward Island’s 2017 tuna fishery is down to its final 11 fish

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans reports that, as of Monday, there were 10 tags still remaining for Prince Edward Island’s share of the Canadian allocation, and one tag remaining for Mexican quota which was transferred to the P.E.I. fishery. Tag-holders have until December 31 to catch their fish, but they might have to sail a distance to get them on the hook. Doug Fraser, a western P.E.I. representative on the tuna advisory committee said there hasn’t been a tuna landed off North Cape since late last week. click here to read the story 17:54

‘Our livelihood is taken from us’: Couple feels left out of William’s Harbour resettlement

The Russells have fished out of William’s Harbour for 28 years — from a house that’s been in their family for generations — but they aren’t getting compensation for their home or a say in the community’s resettlement. “[We] never had enough time in,” said Maryhannah Russell.  The Newfoundland and Labrador government is providing up to $270,000 per household for residents of the village — located on an island off Labrador’s south coast — to move out.,, click here to read the story 09:10

Thousands Of Mussels Live In This Humboldt Park Warehouse

In a nondescript Humboldt Park warehouse, thousands of mussels trucked in from Newfoundland are living out their final hours in an ocean-like environment designed to mimic a mollusk’s natural saltwater habitat. “No one wants to eat old seafood. We’re trying to make it fresher, safer and easier to distribute mussels locally and to a wider audience,” Chicago Wet Storage owner Guy Furman said during a recent tour of his inland facility, 3125 W. Chicago Ave. click here to read the story 13:02

Fisherman claims DFO policy discriminates against disabled fishermen

A lobster fisherman from Granville Ferry is suing the federal government, claiming one of its licensing policies discriminates against disabled fishermen and is therefore unconstitutional. In a lawsuit filed Friday in Nova Scotia Supreme Court, Dana Robinson says the Department of Fisheries and Oceans can authorize a substitute to fish a licence if the owner has a medical condition, but that authorization expires after five years. click here to read the story 16:31

First Nation groups in Newfoundland and Labrador coming together to apply for new surf clam licence

The Qalipu Mi’kmaq First Nation Band is looking at getting in on another fishing enterprise. Earlier this year, Qalipu announced it was teaming up with the Barry Group in pursuing a quota to harvest ocean perch off western Newfoundland. Monday, three Indigenous groups from Newfoundland and Labrador, including Qalipu, the Miawpukek First Nation and the Innu Nation, announced they will be partnering to apply for a new Artic surf clam licence being made available by the federal government. click here to read the story 09:20

Weather ‘bomb’ slams New England, knocking out power to more than 1 million

More than 1.3 million residents of the Northeast U.S. were in the dark on Monday morning after an unusually fierce coastal storm rapidly intensified and slammed into New York State overnight. The storm knocked out power to more people across the region than any other storm since Hurricane Sandy hit exactly 5 years ago. Winds gusted higher than hurricane force from eastern Long Island to Maine, with a peak wind gust of 93 miles per hour recorded in Mashpee, Massachusetts. click here to read the story 18:13

Nova Scotia Lobster buyers want ‘above-board’ investment mechanism to secure supply

Next month, the season opens in Canada’s biggest lobster fishery but even before the first trap hits the water, there’s big news in southwestern Nova Scotia. It is a proposal from a coalition of prominent lobster dealers who want the federal government to grant them the authority to give loans to fishermen like a bank or any other financial institution. “They could put out the money, they would hold the mortgage and then they would have a business arrangement with [the] person owning the licence where they would, I assume, buy the product,” said Robert Thibault, spokesperson for the newly formed Western Nova Scotia Lobster Dealers Coalition. click here to read the story 12:40

Calling for a shutdown – Fish farm protestors challenge Minister of Fisheries and Oceans

Protesters calling for the shutdown of fish farms interrupted a speech by Minister of Fisheries and Oceans Dominic LeBlanc on the dock of Victoria’s inner harbour Saturday. Joined by Minster of Environment and Climate Change Catherine McKenna,,, The two ministers were invited to speak to announce the federal government had reached its 2017 conservation goal of designating five per cent of Canada’s oceans as protected areas. But that announcement was interrupted by a peaceful protest by a group called Fish Farms Out Now. click here to read the story 15:31

Yarmouth Sea Products outlines extensive safety steps taken following serious injury to crewmember in 2015

It was just supposed to be another ordinary fishing trip, except that on the water things don’t always happen the way they’re supposed to. But that can change. An accident onboard the scallop dragger Compass Rose II in June 2015 left a crewmember (Clayton Joudrey) with permanent injuries. In a room of fishermen and others 28 months later, the owners of that vessel, Yarmouth Sea Products Ltd., gave a presentation on the extensive safety steps that have been undertaken to prevent such an accident from happening again. The presentation was ordered by the court as part of the penalty,,, click here to read the story 13:43

Kristen Monsell: Before Banning Canadian Snow Crab, Test for Wolbachia

10:03

Tropical Storm Philippe heads toward Florida Keys

Tropical Storm Philippe, which formed Saturday afternoon (Oct. 28) off the coast of Cuba, was closing in on the Florida Keys hours later and expected to cross the southern tip of the state overnight. According to the National Hurricane Center, Philippe was still a weak tropical storm as of 8 p.m. Central time with maximum sustained winds of 40 mph. It was was 75 miles southwest of Key West and moving north at 28 mph. The storm is expected to make a turn to the northeast overnight, taking it into the northwest Bahamas by Sunday morning. click here to read the story 21:36

Sea Change – The Struggle for Safety in Fishing, Canada’s Deadliest Industry

Despite safety gains in many other industries, fishing continues to have the highest fatality rate of any employment sector in Canada. Even as the long lists of the dead continue to grow, regulators and policy-makers are challenged by the grim fatalism that pervades a world in which generations of fishermen have gone out into the sea and, all too often, not come home. In the tidy port town of Lunenburg, N.S., near the ocean’s edge, a touching memorial lists the fishermen who have lost their lives at sea since 1890. “Dedicated to the memory of those who have gone down to the sea in ships,” says the inscription on a slab of black granite, and to those who “continue to occupy their business in the great waters.” click here to read the story 12:29

Father and son building 50-foot Cape Islanders in backyard

Shawn Boudreau didn’t get a chance to answer. “No,” his wife Lisa called out from the garden in response to the question of whether he’d build a third fishing boat in their backyard. “Two will be enough.” Shawn just sort of half-smiled and looked at the 50-by-30-foot Cape Island hull behind his mobile home on Isle Madame. The boat he launched two weeks ago, All Segments, is already fishing off Digby. Now he’s starting another. click here to read the story 09:22

Joachim Murray lived life with seawater in his veins

My great-uncle, Capt. Joachim Murray, was described in “Doreys and Doreymen” by Otto Kelland (of “Let Me Fish Off Cape St. Mary’s” fame) “as one of these young men from Newfoundland, who through sheer courage and perseverance, in an amazingly short time, raised themselves from doreymen to captain on board fishing vessels out of Gloucester, Massachusetts.” Joachim was the elder brother of my grandfather, Maurice Murray, of Marquise at Argentia. He migrated to Gloucester from Argentia in the latter part of the 19th century. Joachim married Esther Williams of Bay Bulls and they settled into a private life with their young daughter, Louise, at 20 Leighton Ct., Gloucester. On Jan. 29th, 1897, the Gloucester schooner Helen G. Wells arrived in Boston, its flag at half-mast. Its captain, William N. Wells, had been swept overboard in a gale and lost at sea. click here to read the story 14:23

Baffin Fisheries Coalition launches $1.4M lawsuit against ex-CEO

The Baffin Fisheries Coalition (BFC) is suing its former CEO Garth Reid for allegedly defrauding the company of $1.4 million. The lawsuit, filed in the Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador, alleges Reid was building on private land he owned in Winterton, N.L., and invoiced the work to BFC and its subsidiary Niqitaq Fisheries (NFL) — funneling goods and services through a construction company in Quebec. The lawsuit says Reid, who was CEO at the time, claimed the work was for a project in Pond Inlet, Nunavut. He was terminated two weeks ago. click here to read the story  10:57

International Pacific Halibut Commission to revisit minimum size limit

The International Pacific Halibut Commission, which regulates halibut fisheries in U.S. and Canadian waters, is set to take a fresh look at the minimum size limit during its meeting cycle this winter. The current limit allows commercial fishermen to retain fish larger than 32 inches, but the size of mature halibut has been shrinking over the years, which has some wondering whether the limit should be reduced or removed altogether. click here to read the story 09:16

Many Northern Peninsula harvesters preparing to pack up gear as cod season slows

Now into the last week of October, many fishermen along the Northern Peninsula say the cod season is dwindling for the year. Englee harvester Larry Cull says despite a rough start, it’s been a decent season for his enterprise. “We lost about three weeks because we had no buyer,” said Cull. “It was not as good as last year, but still fairly good.” With a lack of capelin along the peninsula shores this year, most of the cod caught has been particularly small with an assortment of odd baits found in their bellies. click here to read the story 10:50

F/V Burin Breeze Crew Assists in Two Overnight Rescue Missions

Ralph Paul and his two-man crew Brian Paul and Steve Caul had an eventful adventure while fishing on the St. Pierre Banks yesterday, onboard the Burin Breeze. They were called on for two rescue missions. The first was around 6:00 yesterday evening when Ralph Paul and his crew received a mayday from a vessel fishing for sea cucumber about six miles from their location.,, While heading to their home port of Burin around 10:30 last night—with the crew members from the first rescue onboard—they received a second call click here to read the story 16:00

Fine laid after vessel runs aground in Witless Bay

The company that owns a vessel that ran aground near the Witless Bay Ecological Reserve has been fined $35,000 in Newfoundland and Labrador provincial court. Bright Eye Fishing Corporation pleaded guilty to violations under the Migratory Birds Convention Act of 1994, according to a media release issued by the federal government Wednesday. The money will go towards an environmental damages fund and the company’s name will be added to the environmental offenders registry. click here to read the story 15:34

Enviro groups threaten Canadian snow crab imports over whale deaths

An alliance of U.S. environmental groups is preparing to ask Washington to ban imports of Canadian snow crab unless Ottawa steps up its efforts to save the endangered Atlantic right whales. Kristen Monsell, a senior attorney at the Center for Biological Diversity, said a provision of the United States Fishermen’s Protection Act allows the White House to ban imports of fish or seafood from a country if that catch is affecting conservation efforts of an endangered species. Monsell said snow crab is the target, because Canada has no mandatory regulations in place for snow grab gear or lines that could help keep whales from getting caught in them and Canada itself. click here to read the story 07:47

Record high prices, strong demand for Canadian snow crab bodes well for Alaska

The top executives of Royal Greenland and Ocean Choice International (OCI) noted demand has remained strong for Canadian snow crab in 2017, despite record-high prices caused by reduced supply from the Newfoundland and Labrador fishery. In April, Canada’s Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) cut the 2017/2018 total allowable catch (TAC) for the Newfoundland and Labrador fishery 22% year-on-year — to 35,419 metric tons — causing prices to increase to record levels of over $8 per pound (for 5-8 ounce size crab) during the season, sources said. The Newfoundland season started on April 6 and finished between May and August, depending on the area. click here to read the story 18:38

North Atlantic Right Whale Consortium – scientists say Right whales could be 20 years away from certain extinction

Scientists at an annual meeting for North Atlantic right whales estimate the species has a little over two decades left to survive unless changes are made immediately. The North Atlantic Right Whale Consortium’s annual meeting was held in Halifax on Sunday, and all of the scientists spoke with a sense of urgency about the fate of these whales. This summer, at least 15 right whales died in Canadian and U.S. waters and scientists at the conference stressed that human activity is the primary cause of death for all right whales. click here to read the story 11:21

B.C. crab and prawn fishermen dispute Port of Vancouver no-go zones – will force them from where they’ve long fished

Crab fisherman Stewart McDonald is steaming mad that he may soon be prevented by the Port of Vancouver from dropping crab traps around Vancouver’s Burrard Inlet, where he’s fished for more than two decades.,, On Friday, the Port of Vancouver, Canada’s largest port, confirmed it has made changes to its information guide, which provides rules for where vessels — like McDonald’s fishing boat — can travel. A port spokesman said the changes were needed because the waters were getting crowded with recreational boaters. click here to read the story 12:26