Category Archives: Featured

The Long Haul

“I been here for so many years, I just can’t give it up,” he says. He raises his voice over the whine of the hydraulic hauler that lifts his trap out of Muscongus Bay. After more than nine decades on the water, World War II veteran and Maine-art-lore inheritor John Olson can’t stop trapping lobsters. At 96, Olson is square-shouldered and cowboy-lean, and although he sticks closer to shore than he used to, he still works 250 lobster traps in the waters off Cushing. His 68-year-old son, Sam, one of seven children, hoists the trap over the gunwale. >Photo’s, click to read<14:14

Photos: Remembering the Exxon Valdez oil spill 30 years later

It was just after midnight on March 24, 1989, when an Exxon Shipping Co. tanker ran aground outside the town of Valdez, Alaska, spewing millions of gallons of thick, toxic crude oil into the pristine Prince William Sound. The world watched the aftermath unfold: scores of herring, sea otters and birds soaked in oil, and hundreds of miles of shoreline polluted. Commercial fishermen in the area saw their careers hit bottom. It’s been 30 years since the disaster, at the time the largest oil spill in U.S. history. Only the 2010 Deep Water Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico has eclipsed it. >click to read<16:16

Gone squiddin’ in Galilee

Capt. Kevin Jones has been fishing out of the Port of Galilee, in southern Rhode Island, for a long time. “You know, I’m 63, and I started going when I was six years old,” he said. As a kid growing up near one of Rhode Island’s busiest ports, Jones helped out on other fishing boats as he worked his way up the ranks. Now, he’s captain of a 70-foot trawler. His primary catch, like most captains in Galilee, is squid. Longfin inshore squid, the species brought ashore at Galilee, is a point of pride in Rhode Island. The squid are processed and frozen at the port, and are shipped all across the country and the world for human consumption. >click to read<20:47

Blended Waters: Seeing is believing – Life teaches us…if we let it

Almost everyone who knows the commercial fishing industry and what’s really involved in it would likely confer with what I share with you in Blended Waters. Wives, or girlfriends who try to keep the bills paid when the ocean’s as rough as a cobb or when the nor’easter blows relentlessly for days on end know that the daily forecast can make or break you so, when you’re the primary income producer in a family and you fish, you fish hard. You fish like you mean it otherwise, cut the engine and leave your keys on the washboard. >click to read< by Marsha Brown14:38

Please donate to New Jersey Fisherman James Lacey’s Memorial Fund

Today we mourn the loss of our brother, son, cousin, uncle, and friend James Lacey. Jim died when the fishing boat he worked on capsized in the waters off the Oregon coast. (Full story.) We always knew Jim had one of the hardest jobs in the world and he wouldn’t have it any other way.,,, We’re raising money to help return his remains to the east coast so that he can be laid to rest. Any additional funds raised will go to support charitable causes that support the families of fisherman lost at sea. Thank you for your generosity, your thoughts, and your prayers. May he rest in peace. >click to read, and please, donate if you can.< Thank you.10:18

Please donate to Oregon Fisherman Josh Porter’s Memorial Fund

The Mary B 2 crab boat capsized about 10pm Tuesday Jan 8, 2019 while crossing the Yaquina Bay Bar Newport Oregon. Three fisherman died in he accident including my brother-in-law, Josh Porter, age 50. He is survived by his wife, Denise Barrett-Porter and a loving family. Josh was the sole financial supporter for his family and tirelessly (and happily) worked difficult jobs as a fisherman and logger in the off-season. >click here, and please donate if you can<10:26  Go Fund Me To Help Fisherman’s Family – >click to read<

Capt. Mark Phillips and the Illusion, the last of its kind

‘It’s not fish you’re buying – it’s men’s lives.’’ – Sir Walter Scott. The Predator sits dockside in Greenport, behind Alice’s Fish Market, a rusting hulk of a fishing trawler, 75 feet long and with no certain future to speak of. It is Mark Phillips’ boat, but he is away most days trolling offshore for squid in his other trawler, the Illusion. “It is not going to sea anytime soon,” Phillips said by cellphone, an edge of weary disgust in his voice. “The Predator’s days have come and gone.” The Illusion was dragging for squid near Nantucket on a hot day in mid-July. Phillips had started that week near Jones Inlet on western Long Island, but the ocean had heated up and the squid, which don’t like warm water, were scarce, so he moved the Illusion farther east in pursuit of success. >click to read<09:41

Michelle Malkin Investigates – Fishing Wars | Drowning in Regulations

Commercial fishing boats in New England are going under at an alarming rate, and hard-working families are being demonized by a multimillion-dollar environmental industry whose only product to sell is fear. In this episode, Michelle Malkin travels to the Northeast to hear the stories of people in the fishing industry who are drowning in government regulations. >Watch the full version, click here< 13:25

Government Waste – Regulatory Discards

This is what the government and their stupid regulations make us discard. Thrown away dead feeding the crabs. Fishermen would be more than happy to bring them home and give them away to feed the hungry. But nooo can’t do that. With what stupid regulations make us discard we could end hunger in this nation. Totally outrageous. 11:10

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