Category Archives: Featured

A Fundraiser for Injured Crab Fisherman Sean Harvell’s Recovery Fund

On November 26th 2018 while working on a commercial fishing boat, Sean suffered a blow to the head by a crab pot (large crabbing cage). He was rendered unconscious and suffered seizures while en route to the coast guard and then the hospital. He immediately underwent emergency brain surgery to remove pieces of his skull from his brain. Fortunately his surgery went well and he is on the road to recovery. Unfortunately, he has been left with a hole in his skull, needs more surgery ,, Sean had been working on a commercial fishing boat to support his fiancé and two young children. Due to doctors restrictions, he can not travel home before the second surgery. They need some help, >click to read, and please donate if you can.<20:10

Don Mathews – Reflections of a life on the water

The Newport waterfront is less rich today for the passing of a man who’s determined spirit exemplified the fishing life. A Springfield native who helped pioneer and innovate the Alaska fisheries in the 1970s, Don Mathews was best known on the central coast for piloting crab boats through winter seas and for launching Marine Discovery Tours to help share his knowledge and love of the ocean. Don died at age 69 on Nov. 9 after a battle with cancer. His determination to carve a niche in a brutal world, the struggle to balance family with his own craving for the next fishing season, and his sense of humor and willingness to lend his neighbor a hand are stories that go to the very bone of this harbor. As the surf pounded restlessly in the view from the Mathews home this week, his wife Fran remembered a shared life stretching back three and half decades — to the Alaska port of Kodiak where it all started. >click to read<18:09

Editorial: Too close for comfort

Friday brought what may be the worst oil spill so far in the East Coast offshore. Husky Energy’s SeaRose production vessel spilled as much as 250,000 litres of oil into the ocean on Friday morning. Much of that oil is unlikely to be recovered and has instead been widely dispersed. The SeaRose is the same vessel that failed to follow iceberg protocols in March 2017, and was almost hit by an iceberg. Meanwhile, the Canada-Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board (C-NLOPB) and the provincial government are still tied up in the usual conundrum. That’s the problem of being oil industry proponents, promoters, owners — and regulators. >click to read<

A single Snow crab fetches record $24,000 at Japan auction

TOTTORI – A single snow crab fetched a record ¥2 million (S$24,188) in the season’s first auction to be held at a port in Tottori Prefecture, on Wednesday. Snow crabs are a prized winter treat in Japan. The previous record for the prefecture was ¥1.3 million, set in 2016, according to the Tottori fisheries department. An official of the prefectural government said the bid for the premium snow crab must be the highest ever in the country. >click to read<21:10

Fishermen ask for more time to study wind impact

Fishermen, fish processors and others warned on Thursday that fishing grounds will be lost with the construction of Vineyard Wind,,, “We have this huge area we’re going to develop, and obviously we’ve got a pretty close timeline,” said Ed Barrett, a commercial fisherman from the South Shore. “How are you ever going to even come close to figuring out an impact? … I have zero faith in that.” >click to read<13:32

‘I love upholding the tradition’ – 1880 history lives on at Shelburne Dory Shop

Not much has changed since John C. Williams opened his dory shop on Shelburne’s waterfront in 1880. Now part of the Nova Scotia Museum, dories are still built there much the same as they were 140 years ago. The original master patterns for the knees, the stem and the stern still hang in their respective places along the walls of the dory shop. Overhead are more patterns and jigs for scribing out the bottoms of the dories and for the risers. The original building platform for building the dories is still used. More images, >click to read<14:31

Capt. Mark Phillips and the Illusion, the last of its kind

‘It’s not fish you’re buying – it’s men’s lives.’’ – Sir Walter Scott. The Predator sits dockside in Greenport, behind Alice’s Fish Market, a rusting hulk of a fishing trawler, 75 feet long and with no certain future to speak of. It is Mark Phillips’ boat, but he is away most days trolling offshore for squid in his other trawler, the Illusion. “It is not going to sea anytime soon,” Phillips said by cellphone, an edge of weary disgust in his voice. “The Predator’s days have come and gone.” The Illusion was dragging for squid near Nantucket on a hot day in mid-July. Phillips had started that week near Jones Inlet on western Long Island, but the ocean had heated up and the squid, which don’t like warm water, were scarce, so he moved the Illusion farther east in pursuit of success. >click to read<09:41

Michelle Malkin Investigates – Fishing Wars | Drowning in Regulations

Commercial fishing boats in New England are going under at an alarming rate, and hard-working families are being demonized by a multimillion-dollar environmental industry whose only product to sell is fear. In this episode, Michelle Malkin travels to the Northeast to hear the stories of people in the fishing industry who are drowning in government regulations. >Watch the full version, click here< 13:25

Government Waste – Regulatory Discards

This is what the government and their stupid regulations make us discard. Thrown away dead feeding the crabs. Fishermen would be more than happy to bring them home and give them away to feed the hungry. But nooo can’t do that. With what stupid regulations make us discard we could end hunger in this nation. Totally outrageous. 11:10

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