Category Archives: International News

Catch Shares – Veteran commercial fishers fear the worst for industry

Third generation fisherman Kevin Cannon has been net fishing on the Coast for 55 years, but is “demoralised” that a quota system proposed for the region’s popular species. Mr Cannon said flathead, bream, whiting, taylor and barramundi – “bread and butter” fish – were all some of the species included which would de-value his licence by “up to 60 per cent”. Agricultural Industry Development and Fisheries Minister Mark Furner said many fisheries in Australia and around the world used the proposed system where individuals were allocated a share of the stock. (standard EDF line),  “This provides security of access and allows them to plan their businesses,” >click to read< 08:51

Faye Passanisi – Fair winds and following seas to my writing colleague and friend, Bill Allen

Greetings, I’d like to share about Bill Allen ~ my writing colleague, and friend. Bill and I “met” due to an “accidental click” on my computer 4 years ago. 6 months after my “accidental click,” I was FB “friended” by Bill Allen and the same day was asked to co-write PORT BLISS with him and JW Gooding.,,, Bill was quick, witty and had a sense of humor. It was a pleasure to co-write with him and get to know him and he would tell me that I was everything good in his life. He did not want PORT BLISS to come to an end but it had to, eventually, in order to get it published. >click to read< 22:24

Resqunit Launches Canadian Operations

Resqunit has found its Canadian home at Dartmouth’s Centre for Ocean Venture & Entrepreneurship’s (COVE) Start-Up Yard, and on July 15th, none other than Deadliest Catch’s Sig Hansen served as host at their housewarming party.  A venture founded in Norway in November 2017, Resqunit is a floatation device that secures fishing gear, such as lobster traps and crab pots. When a trap gets lost, and remains under water for a period of time, the Resqunit is released, floating to the surface – saving expensive gear, hard sought-after fish stocks and protecting marine life that are often stuck inside these “ghost traps”. >click to read< 18:24  Floatation device for lobster traps – video, >click here<

Untested Waters: Feds take small steps toward inspecting more seafood

In hopes of making a dent in safety issues associated with the growing amount of foreign seafood coming into the United States, the federal government recently announced two changes: a new safety strategy and $3.1 million of additional funding. Longtime shrimper George Barisich had just come in from Breton Sound off the Gulf of Mexico after five days and four nights on the water. With him were two crew members and 3,500 pounds of fresh shrimp. Imaginably tired, Barisich, 63, was still eager to talk about the industry on which he was raised – an industry he said keeps changing. Video, >click to read< 14:19

Brexit Party MEP just insulted everyone from EU fishing vessels to Argentina

A Brexit Party MEP (Robert Rowland) has called for the Royal Navy to sink EU fishing vessels that enter a 200 mile exclusion zone around the United Kingdom. The policy would see EU boats as far away as France’s Bay of Biscay attacked by British warships. The 200 miles exclusion zone would also include a number of EU capitals and major cities such as Paris, Brussels, Amsterdam, and Dublin.,,, “We are behind all our fisherman and the restoration of sovereignty over our waters. 200 miles of exclusion zone with any foreign fishing vessel given the same treatment as the Belgrano!” >click to read< 13:53

What lies beneath: Gulf of Mexico likely holds tons of discarded military munitions

Today, questions remain as to exactly where those munitions are off the U.S. coastlines, what their condition might be, what dangers they might pose, and whether or not it makes sense to attempt to recover them for land-based disposal.,, Dumped from barges or sent to the bottom aboard scuttled ships, estimates are that millions of pounds of military munitions — unexploded 250-, 500- and 1,000-pound bombs, land mines, mustard gas and other chemical weapons, including munitions confiscated from Nazi Germany and elsewhere following World War II — were sunk off the eastern seaboard of the United States, around the Gulf of Mexico and off the coasts of the Hawaiian islands. Records of the dumped munitions, if kept at all, are scarce. Some likely are inaccurate. Some likely were destroyed. >click to read< 15:11

Fishing Boat’s Chief Mate Charged With Killing Eight Crewmembers

Early this year, the suspect was serving as the chief mate aboard the tuna fishing vessel Wen Peng on a voyage in the Indian Ocean. On February 20, while the boat was operating off Mauritius, the mate was involved in a verbal altercation with some of the crewmembers over their work. He then stabbed and killed one Philippine crewmember, then a second, prompting eight additional members of the crew to jump over the side to escape. Two of those who went over the side were rescued by another vessel; six others are missing and presumed dead. In total, three Philippine nationals and five Indonesians died in the fight. >click to read<12:08

Tragic details that have come out about Deadliest Catch

The Discovery Channel’s bracing look at the lives and losses of Bering Sea crab men, Deadliest Catch, has been packing a punch since it debuted in 2007.,, Crabbing is not for the faint of heart or the fragile. The ocean, in other words, offers no safe spaces. Unfortunately for the stars of Deadliest Catch, the drama has not been confined to the high seas. Tragedy has followed the show’s captains and crew members on-shore, landing several of them in court and even in jail cells. And some who have escaped sinking or burning ships have done so only to die in hotel rooms or in their own front yards. >click to read< 15:06

Canadian company wins approval for new lobster bait fish

The blackbelly rosefish is an abundant species that ranges from Canada to South America. Cooke Aquaculture, a New Brunswick, Canada-based company, requested Maine’s approval to sell rosefish as bait, and the company announced plans to harvest the fish off Uruguay. “We believe this is a solution to address concerns from the lobster fishery on the challenges they are currently facing on account of bait shortages,” said Glenn Cooke, chief executive officer of Cooke Inc., which includes Cooke Aquaculture.>click to read< 22:22

Maine’s congressional delegation asks President Trump to help lobstermen facing right whale regulations

“Dear Mr. President: We write to urge your intervention in a matter of serious economic importance to the State of Maine. The livelihoods of thousands of hardworking lobstermen and women are currently under grave threat from new regulations under development by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA),” the letter states.,, “In the past two years, fourteen of twenty-two confirmed right whale deaths were found in Canadian waters,” they write. “So far in 2019, there have been six right whale deaths, all of which took place in Canada. Three of those deaths have been attributed to ship strikes, not fishing gear entanglements.” >click to read< 10:02

How the blackbelly rosefish from South America could help Maine lobstermen who are short on bait

The state for the first time has approved using fish raised off the coast of Uruguay as lobster bait to help offset a bait shortage that could increase lobster prices. Cook e Aquaculture USA of Machiasport announced the Maine Department of Marine Resources’ decision on Wednesday, saying it could help lobstermen weather a drop in the population of their primary bait source, herring, off the Maine coast. The New England Fishery Management Council in June cut the amount of herring fishermen can catch off the New England coast in 2020 and 2021. >click to read< 21:44

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 44′ Wedgeport Novi Longliner/Federal Permits, Kubota – 10 KW Genset

Specifications, information and 8 photo’s >click here<. To see all the boats in this series, >click here< 12:20

Searching for Keith – A detective’s quest reveals how one idealistic fisheries observer may have collided with criminals and desperate migrants—and paid for it with his life.

Long before Karsten von Hoesslin first heard the name Keith Davis, before he spent countless unpaid hours tugging at investigative threads and careening into dead ends as he searched for answers about the man’s strange disappearance from a fishing vessel, before he jetted to South America chasing clues, he dedicated his days to dealing with a different sort of challenge—pirates.,,, His first case, which he funded with his own savings, was a 2012 mass murder of as many as 34 fishermen in the Indian Ocean.,,, Davis, a fisheries observer originally from Arizona, had been working on the high seas aboard a tuna transshipment vessel—a ship that collects catches from fishing boats and ferries them to port, saving the boats a long trip to shore. As an observer, his job was to independently monitor the catches and collect data from tuna transfers. He was on deck, watching the crew prepare to hoist loads of tuna into the ship’s hold, just before he went missing on a calm September 2015 day in the eastern Pacific at the age of 40. A 44 minute audio report, >click to read< 22:10

Solar And Wind – Taxpayer-Funded Ponzi Schemes with renewable portfolio laws, or quotas created by your elected politicians

The solar electricity industry is dependent on federal government subsidies for building new capacity. The subsidy consists of a 30% tax credit and the use of a tax scheme called tax equity finance. These subsidies are delivered during the first five years. For wind, there is a subsidy during the first five to ten years resulting from tax equity finance. There is also a production subsidy that lasts for the first ten years. The other subsidy for wind and solar, not often characterized as a subsidy, is state renewable portfolio laws, or quotas, that require that an increasing portion of a state’s electricity come from renewable sources. >click to read< 13:58

Europe Runs Out of Fish

July 9 is European Fish Dependence Day, the moment when the E.U. has used up all its own seafood resources and must rely entirely on imports for the rest of the year to meet demand. This year it falls about a whole month earlier than in 2000. Illegal fishing and over-fishing are eroding food security, says the Environmental Justice Foundation (EJF) To end this, transparency in the industry must be improved, allowing consumers to make sustainable choices,,, Austria is the first country to run out of fish, only reaching January 17 before exhausting its own supply. The U.K., as a seafaring nation, would reach September 7, still leaving around four months relying entirely on imports. >click to read< 12:43

With billions at stake, Canada to show U.S. its fisheries protect whales

In an effort to maintain access to the lucrative U.S. seafood market, Canada will submit a “progress report” to Washington outlining steps to protect whales and other marine mammals that interact with more than 200 Canadian fisheries. The submission will be the first test of Canada’s ability to meet upcoming requirements in the United States Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), and comes as three critically endangered North Atlantic right whales are believed entangled in fishing gear in Canadian waters. Efforts to free them are set for Tuesday, a day after Canada announced additional measures to protect North Atlantic right whales. >click to read<08:37

Lack of Trust muddies the water in UK fishing industry, (it muddies all waters, not just in the UK)

A survey of UK fishermen has revealed low levels of trust in key government organisations and scientists. The authors of the study say it is an area that urgently needs to be addressed for a successful fishing industry after Brexit. The study, (another hypothesis) by researchers (someone doing their Masters) at the University of York, involved a questionnaire designed to examine how well fishermen working in the UK fishing industry trusted key governing bodies, scientists and environmental groups. The researchers found low levels of trust in nearly all the institutions included in the survey. This is likely to be down to poor communication, political interference and discontent with the EU’s Common Fisheries Policy, the authors suggest. (The authors are biased towards management, actually, so unless you’re an EDF fisherman, none of this makes sense. >click to read< 13:05

Lobster prices range from $7 to $8 per pound in Cape Breton

Lobster fishermen in Cape Breton are getting $7 or more a pound for the last two weeks of the season.  Starting prices were $7 and they dropped to $6.50 for a couple of weeks before rising again to $7 for many Cape Breton lobster fishermen. However, some are getting $7.50 or $8 a pound based on who the buyer is. “I don’t understand why in parts of Nova Scotia (like the South Shore) they get fifty-cent more than we do when we’re supposed to have the best product here in Eastern Nova Scotia,” said Garren O’Neil who fishes out of Main-à-Dieu and gets $7 a pound. >click to read< 12:29

Mogul, wandering North Atlantic right whale, spotted off coast of France

A North Atlantic right whale that made headlines last year for his wanderlust in Iceland has decided to take a more southerly European vacation this year. Mogul, an 11-year-old male right whale, was spotted June 21 feeding off the coast of Penmarc’h, France, in the Bay of Biscay. It’s a curious spot for a young right whale to find himself, said Heather Pettis, associate scientist at the Anderson Cabot Center for Ocean Life at the New England Aquarium. >click to read<12:47

Honduran families receive bodies of sunk fishing boat victims

Families of the 27 people who died after a Honduran fishing boat sank have started receiving the bodies of their relatives, as the country’s president ordered a probe into the incident. The vessel sank on Wednesday in the remote eastern Mosquitia region after heading out to sea when a seasonal ban on lobster fishing was lifted. “We feel deep regret” over the drownings, President Juan Orlando Hernande wrote on his official Twitter account Thursday. “We stand in solidarity with the families,” adding he had demanded an investigation. >click to read< 17:18

Has charity’s call to save Fleetwood’s small boat fishing fleet come too late?

Fleetwood’s once great fishing fleet is now down to just three small boats and these remaining fishermen are struggling to make a living.,, The charity called on consumers, particularly in coastal counties and cities, to buy fresh local fish rather than fish imported from foreign waters, and to be more adventurous and try eating varieties of fish and shellfish that are plentiful around the UK’s coastline. But one of the last remaining fishermen in Fleetwood, John Worthington, says the current business is barely sustainable for those catching fish and landing it in Fleetwood. >click to read< 13:06

Grundéns and Gore-Tex® build rugged new line of fishing rain gear

Grundéns, producer of the world’s best fishing foul weather gear, today announces a new, rugged line of fishing rain gear in partnership with Gore-Tex®. 3 jackets and 2 bibs, all designed with specific fishing features and utilizing Gore-Tex’s® proprietary waterproof breathable technology, will provide exceptional wet weather protection to anglers in a variety of climates. Available to Grundéns top dealers and on Grundens.com in Fall 2019, the line will be widely available at all retailers in Spring of 2020. >click to read< 12:26

At least 27 dead and nine missing after fishing vessel capsizes off the coast of Honduras as authorities scramble to rescue more

At least 27 fishermen drowned and another nine are still missing after a vessel capsized on Wednesday during bad weather off the northern coast of Honduras. The Honduran military rescued 55 from the ‘Capitán Waly’, which set out from Port Ceiba on July 1 to net lobster. Hitting stormy weather, the boat went down some 80 nautical miles from the coast near the Gorda Keys, northeast of the easternmost point of the Honduran coast.  >click to read< 16:59

Right whale protections may not be enough, federal review shows

Measures taken to protect North Atlantic right whales in the Gulf of St. Lawrence from being struck by ships and getting caught in fishing gear may not be enough, a scientific review by Ottawa shows.,, The review was done late last year by scientists who work in federal departments and universities across Canada, looking at data compiled by marine-mammal experts over the last three years.,, Aerial surveys estimate there were at least 190 right whales in the Gulf last year, half the total known population everywhere. (and none died) >click to read< 12:57

Immediate Action Needed to Save North Atlantic Right Whales – Chris Oliver, Assistant Administrator for NOAA Fisheries >click to read<

Kennebunk Town Column: Invisible lines threaten lobster fishery – Lobstermen are facing the real threat of being forced out of business and a livelihood that they have relied on for many generations. >click to read<

1st whale meat auction held since restart of Japan’s commercial hunt

Whale meat auctions were held Thursday in different parts of Japan, the first since the country ended its 31-year commercial whaling hiatus earlier this week, with some cuts sold for over 10,000 yen ($93) per kilogram. A whaling fleet left Kushiro on Japan’s northernmost main island of Hokkaido on Monday to hunt in coastal waters and took two minke whales later the same day. Approximately 66 kg of meat from one of the two whales was then brought to Taiji, Wakayama Prefecture, for an auction because a vessel from the town was among the fleet. >click to read< 09:49

The Reason Renewables Can’t Power Modern Civilization Is Because They Were Never Meant To

Over the last decade, journalists have held up Germany’s renewables energy transition, the Energiewende, as an environmental model for the world. “Many poor countries, once intent on building coal-fired power plants to bring electricity to their people, are discussing whether they might leapfrog the fossil age and build clean grids from the outset,” thanks to the Energiewende, wrote a New York Times reporter in 2014. With Germany as inspiration, the United Nations and World Bank poured billions into renewables like wind, solar, and hydro in developing nations like Kenya. But then, last year, Germany was forced to acknowledge that it had to delay its phase-out of coal, and would not meet its 2020 greenhouse gas reduction commitments. It announced plans to bulldoze an ancient church and forest in order to get at the coal underneath it. >click to read< 21:49

Two prolific Charleston chefs escape the kitchen and find peace at sea

It’s a little after 2 p.m. on a Monday and the wooden shrimp trawler, built in 1969, sits low in the water at the Wando Dock on Shem Creek. Emily Hahn takes the leap first, nimbly navigating the portside of the Miss Paula in her clunky fishing boots, leaning one deeply tanned arm against a cable as she nods toward the galley.,, The irony that a former Top Chef contestant would not be able to swing it in the boat’s kitchen makes Hahn smile. She’s smiling a lot, actually,,, Hahn says that after a few months of full-time shrimping, she finally has her sea legs, and she’s been able to wean off her daily dose of Dramamine.  “We’ve been making some pretty epic crew food: shrimp and grits, ceviche, fried fish tacos, eggs in a hole with fried onions and bacon.” The crew was understandably happy when they discovered their new mate’s skills, “they’re like ‘Oh — you can really cook!”  >click to read<10:17

What’s behind Japan’s support of whaling?

Japan has for decades been steadfastly defiant about hunting whales despite widespread anger, including from key allies like the United States. After roughly 30 years of what it has called scientific research whaling, which saw several hundred minke whales taken annually in the Antarctic and North Pacific, Japan in December announced it would leave the International Whaling Commission(IWC) and resume commercial whaling on July 1. >click to read< 14:21

Council Responds to Honolulu Civil Beat Series, Acts on Hawai’i Fisheries and Protected Species

The Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council yesterday in Honolulu responded to the Honolulu Civil Beat’s three-part series suggesting members of the Council’s Executive Committee engaged in decision-making for self-profit. Vice Chair John Gourley (Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, or CNMI) said the Civil Beat articles implied that funding he received from the Sustainable Fisheries Fund for fish biosampling continued after he became a Council member. Honolulu Civil Beat statements about Gourley were included in a section titled “Conflicts of Interest.” >click to read<08:32

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 39′ BHM Dragger, 435HP Volvo, Nextgen – 3.5 KW, State and Federal Permits Available

Specifications, information and 24 photos >click here< To see all the boats in this series, >click here<11:38