Category Archives: International News

Fighting the ‘good enough’ syndrome How Iceland is turning fish into a luxury item

The members of Iceland’s Ocean Cluster House, an innovation incubator for start-up companies, are developing new business ideas from fish meat, oil, bones, intestines and skin. This September, government officials, educators and people involved in the Newfoundland and Labrador fishery visited the Ocean Cluster House to take notes on Iceland’s successful experiment. Their tour starts at the house’s public restaurant, “Bergsson,” where pillows are made from boat sails and pendant lights are cleverly fashioned from old buoys. Everywhere you look there are reminders of the fishery.  click here to read the story 18:28

Fishing boat skipper gets suspended sentence for running his vessel aground off Plymouth

Michael Kinnaird, had earlier pleaded guilty to the charges at Plymouth magistrates court on 6 December, which related to an incident on October. It was shortly after 8.45pm on 7 October 2017, that Mr Kinnaird’s vessel, a 21metre trawler FV Algrie left its moorings at Sutton Harbour. It then continued out of the harbour entrance but did not alter course into the shipping channel. Instead, the FV Algrie kept a steady course at seven knots before running aground at Mountbatten Breakwater. click here to read the story 15:05

Businessmen fined a historic $2 million for overfishing rock lobster

Australian rock lobsters are the best in the world but after they started to disappear from unlimited fishing, the government decided the expensive crustacean was going to be fiercely protected. And that was the expensive lesson a number of Wollongong businessmen learnt yesterday after a judge in the coastal city handed down the biggest fines ever given for illegal fishing in NSW history. The group of men, who were part of the fishing company that engaged in the major scam, the seafood restaurant that bought them and anyone associated with the crime, were fined a whopping $2.1 million. click here to read the story 11:16

Fish, Drugs, and Murder – As fisheries along this idyllic looking coast unravel, so does social order.

Lieutenant Olivier Ramirez didn’t waste time. On an August morning in 2015, he scrambled a small coast guard team on Costa Rica’s Pacific coast. Local fishermen had spotted poachers hauling nets full of shimmering fish from the Gulf of Nicoya. Ramirez hoped to catch the offenders and press charges. But that morning, little went according to plan: Ramirez and his men intercepted the poachers close to their home base and within minutes, the officers were in serious trouble. Dozens of poachers were swarming to the scene, wielding rocks, machetes, quarter-stick explosives, and Molotov cocktails. Audio, click here to read the story 07:55

Why Fishermen Fail To Unite and Resist Being Swept Off of Our Historic Fishing Grounds

As fishermen it often seems we are beset on all sides by so many issues that would disenfranchise us, derail our efforts to safeguard our industry, destroy our livelihoods and communities, and push us off of the historically wild and free ocean. Whether it is in the name of industrial power production or environmental protection, we are up against marine monuments, death by a thousand cuts regulation, forests of windmills, observers, cameras, and tracking systems watching us like an Orwellian nightmare, and grids of closure areas that threaten to push us onto fishing reservations like the Native Americans who once stood in the path of progress. click here to continue reading By Jon Johnson 18:51

Matt Ridley: Blue Planet II Was Superb, Save A Few Fishy Facts

Nothing that Hollywood sci-fi screenwriters dream up for outer space begins to rival the beauty and ingenuity of life under water right here. Blue Planet II captured behaviour that was new to science as well as surprising: giant trevally fish eating sooty terns on the wing; Galapagos sea lions herding yellowfin tuna ashore; an octopus wrapping itself in shells to confuse sharks. The series also preached. Every episode had a dose of bad news about the ocean and a rebuke to humanity, while the entire last episode was devoted to the environmental cause, featuring overfishing, pollution, climate change and ocean acidification. The team behind the incomparable Sir David Attenborough has acceded to demands that it should push more environmentalism. click here to read the story 12:26

On This Day: Dec. 11, 1975 – Attack on British vessels heightens Cod War

An Icelandic gunboat has opened fire on unarmed British fishery support vessels in the North Atlantic Sea, it is reported. The violent clash left the Icelandic coastguard ship, Thor, badly damaged but the three British vessels involved appear to be unaffected. The Thor is said to have tried to arrest the British Star Aquarius and her sister vessel the Star Polaris as they sheltered from a force nine gale within Iceland’s 12 mile territorial waters. click here to read the story 09:03

Promising results from UK lobster hatchery

Set up primarily to support the local lobster-fishing industry, the National Lobster Hatchery (NLH)  concentrates on hatching eggs from gravid females caught by local fishermen, keeping them within the safety of the hatchery during their vulnerable larval phase, before releasing them – as comparatively robust juveniles – back into the seas around Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly. However, the researchers have since been experimenting with on-growing these juveniles for longer – and to larger sizes – in a number of different sea-based systems. They hope that this ecological conditioning will not only help to improve the survival of those lobsters that they release back into the wild,,,,  click here to read the story 08:05

Say “No” to Slave Shrimp

The Thanksgiving-Xmas-NYE season, at our house as at many others, is marked by several traditional holiday foods, including shrimp. To procure the shrimp, we usually try to find the best price; shrimp, once a luxury good, now seems pretty much a commodity product. We used to buy shrimp based largely on cost. Lately, however, we’re scrutinizing labels more carefully and digging a little deeper in our pockets. click here to read the story 08:48

The drug-smuggling fishermen vowing to clear their name – Why was there no trace of cocaine?

On 29 May 2010, a small fishing boat left the Isle of Wight on what its crew claim was a routine trip to catch lobster and crab in the English Channel. At the same time, a major surveillance operation was also under way, led by the Serious Organised Crime Agency – which had intelligence about cocaine being on board a giant container ship sailing from South America. That night, one of the ships being monitored and the men’s fishing boat briefly came close together – though exactly how close is still disputed. click here to read the story 11:56

UK’s undersea communications cables ‘uniquely vulnerable’ to sabotage – report

Terrorists using deep-sea grappling hooks attached to fishing trawlers could intercept the UK’s network of undersea communications cables, a report has warned. It said they remained “uniquely vulnerable” to sabotage despite 97% of global communications being transmitted through fibre-optic cables. The report, written by Tory MP Rishi Sunak for right-leaning think-tank Policy Exchange, said a successful attack on Britain’s network would be a “crippling blow” to the country’s security and economy. click here to read the story 08:26

Offshore wind farm could make vital Fife fishing ground a no-go zone

Eight turbines up to 800ft high may be built off the coast of Methil, in an area of rich pickings for fishermen from both sides of the Firth of Forth. Although the Forthwind developers insist fishing could continue around some of the massive structures those in the industry say it would become a no-go zone. Tom Mackenzie, manager of the Fishermen’s Mutual Association (Pittenweem), said: “It would be too dangerous to fish there. click here to read the story 07:49

Fresh evidence that could have cleared the ‘Cocaine Crew’ of £53m smuggling plot is REJECTED

Five men serving prison terms of up to 24 years for a £53 million drug smuggling plot have lost their bid to appeal – despite fresh scientific evidence suggesting the version of events presented by the prosecution at the trial was ‘impossible’. Almost four years after The Mail on Sunday published the first of three investigations casting doubt on the convictions, the Criminal Cases Review Commission (CCRC), which has the power to refer possible miscarriages of justice to the Court of Appeal, has decided to take no action. In doing so, it is rejecting expert evidence that the fishing boat reputedly used to pick up holdalls packed with cocaine from the English Channel never actually reached the spot where the bags might have been dumped. click here to read the story 10:31

B.C. fish farms: a tangled net

Industrial fish farming began in British Columbia with a few small experiments in the 1970s. By the 1990s, it was operating like a well-oiled machine: Smaller farms had been swallowed by large conglomerates, and imported Atlantic salmon had become the preferred breed — the Herefords of aquaculture.,,, So, are fish farms bad? Federal research scientist Kristi Miller says she understands the frustration of not having a definitive answer. click here to read the story 09:43

Clearwater Seafoods fighting counterfeit North Korean clams

Clearwater Seafoods of Halifax has been fighting a secret battle with North Korea. Ian Smith, CEO of Clearwater, says his company has spent millions of dollars building up consumer demand for Arctic surf clams in Asia and the North Koreans are using devious methods to infiltrate the Chinese market for surf clams. “In the China market there’s a very large North Korean Arctic surf clam fishery,” Smith said on Friday in Halifax during a tour of the latest addition to Clearwater’s clam fishing fleet, the Anne Risley. click here to read the story 14:42

Safety culture a priority on the water

Efforts to improve the safety culture among Nova Scotia fishers seems to be paying off. Although we still don’t know the condition of the crewmember airlifted from a lobster fishing vessel off southwest Nova Scotia Wednesday, after having convulsions, the smooth way that operation went — along with another incident where a crew were successfully rescued after having to abandon ship — points to captains and crew being more than ready for emergencies. click here to read the story 12:02

Coast Guard: Russia and U.S. Working Well Together in the Bering Sea, Arctic

Unlike other parts of the world, the U.S. and Russia work well together in the Bering Sea and the Arctic. The pair is enforcing fishing regulations and other laws, conducting search and rescue operations. Moscow and Washington are sending the International Maritime Organization a joint recommendation for safe shipping routes through northern waters, the head of the U.S. Coast Guard in Alaska said on Wednesday. “We see the relationship with Russia [in the Arctic] as a bright spot,” said Rear Adm. Michael McAllister,,, click here to read the story 16:10

Police divers and salvage crews are preparing to raise the sunken fishing vessel Dianne

The Dianne overturned in Bustard Bay overturned in Bustard Bay on October 16 with six crewmen on board.,,, The Observer understands the salvage of the Dianne is being conducted at the direction of Maritime Safety Queensland, though the incident remains a matter for the State Coroner. The divers will be accompanied by officers from the water police, scenes of crime, and disaster victim identification units, as well as the Criminal Investigation Branch. click here to read the story 12:21

B.C. fish processors spewing potentially dangerous bloodwater into key salmon migration corridor

Salmon farming in British Columbia has long faced controversy, with concerns about fish escapes, antibiotic use, and the spread of viruses and sea lice. Most of the anger and calls for change have been directed at fish farms, but CTV News has obtained video footage that shows fish processing plants may be contributing to problems as well. The video shows a farmed-salmon processing plant in the Discovery Passage channel off Vancouver Island discharging bloody effluent from a pipe under the water – effluent that tests have shown contains a highly contagious fish virus. click here to read the story 16:26

THE 2018 MAKO SEASON IS SAVED!

The United States and other nations recently finished up a week of tuna, swordfish and shark management discussions at the 2017 annual meeting of International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) in Marrakech, Morocco. The good news from overseas is that there’s a bluefin tuna quota increase coming for U.S. fishermen; perhaps even better news is that motions by some ICCAT delegates to shut down the North Atlantic mako shark fishery failed (though an increase in harvest size is forthcoming.),,, The final agreement focuses on measures to reduce fishing mortality and efforts to further strengthen data collection, while protecting opportunities for U.S. recreational and commercial fishermen to retain small amounts of shortfin mako sharks. click here to read the story 15:35

Death by Killer Algae

They didn’t think much of the first dead whale. Dwarfed by the rugged cliffs of Patagonia’s high green fjords, the team of biologists had sailed into a gulf off the Pacific Ocean searching for the ocean’s smaller animals, the marine invertebrates they were there to inventory. That night, while hunting for an anchorage in a narrow bay, the team spotted a large, dead whale floating on the water’s surface. But for the biologists, death—even of such an enormous animal—didn’t seem so unusual. Not so unusual, that is, until they found the second whale, lying on the beach. And a third. And a fourth. In all, they found seven in that bay alone. Over the next day, they counted a total of 25 dead whales in the fjord. click here to read the story 15:42

High speed boats deployed to tackle Devon’s illegal crab and lobster trade – Skippers and owners heavily fined

Earlier this year fisheries bosses were tipped off about suspicious landings of crab and lobster at Plymouth. Their intelligence – which came from other concerned commercial fishers – told them that some boats were illegally bringing in under-sized crabs and “berried” lobsters – females carrying eggs. However, they had no information about who was involved, so they lay in wait at sea and intercepted boats heading for Sutton Harbour. Relying on the element of surprise, teams from the Devon and Severn Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authority (IFCA) raced alongside the fishing boats in their RIB and boarded to carry out checks. click here to read the story 12:45

A close encounter with an albatross

Nahuel Chavez is a seabird biologist who has worked as an Albatross Task Force (ATF) Instructor in Argentina for eight years. He has been passionate about saving albatross since his first trip on a longline-fishing vessel when he saw huge numbers of them being killed, and knew he had to do something to stop it. Nahuel writes to us from a trawler off the coast of Argentina where he is on a 55-day trip to monitor the impact on seabirds. photo’s, click here to read the story 20:46

Female first mate untangling the net of male-dominated fishing industry

Nadine Adams began her prawn trawling career as a cook a few years ago, but she has moved out of the kitchen since then and during the recent tiger prawn season was controlling operations on the deck of the FV Ocean Thief, which is part of the Austral Fisheries fleet. “The skipper’s in the wheelhouse most of the time so I’m the person down on the deck making sure things happen the way they should be,” Ms Adams said. “I was kind of itching to move on from the cook’s position, because I’d done it for a couple of years and learnt what I could there.” click here to read the story 11:57

All 7 crew of capsized Japanese fishing boat rescued

Two Japanese and five Indonesian crew members have been rescued after their 15-meter tuna fishing boat was found capsized about 400 kilometers from the Pacific island of Palau, the Japan Coast Guard said Thursday. Planes and ships from the U.S., Japan and Palau had been taking part in the search for the Japanese-flagged Gyotoku Maru No. 1, which capsized southwest of Palau.,, click here to read the story 08:23

Ekofish orders twin-rigger from Stellendam yard

Dutch fishing company Ekofish Group has contracted Damen Maaskant Shipyards Stellendam to build a new twin-rig trawler. The design and equipment of the new vessel will all be in line with Ekofish’s dedication to sustainable fishing methods. The design of the new vessel has been a collaboration between Ekofish, Damen Maaskant Shipyards Stellendam and naval architect Vripack, more well-known for its leisure boat portfolio. click here to read the story 11:59

Search underway for crew of capsized tuna fishing boat off Palau

A search is underway for two Japanese and five Indonesian crew members after their fishing ship was found capsized about 400 kilometers (250 miles) from the Pacific island of Palau. Planes and ships from the U.S., Japan and Palau are taking part in the search for the Japanese-flagged Gyotoku Maru No. 1, the U.S. Coast Guard said Wednesday. The 15-meter (50-foot) tuna fishing boat capsized southwest of Palau. click here to read the story 11:21

Nations decide to increase quota for Atlantic Bluefin tuna

Countries fishing the eastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean agreed Tuesday to expand the annual quota for prized Bluefin tuna to reflect an improvement in their stocks. Two officials at the meeting of the 50-nation International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas said that at the end of the meeting Tuesday, countries have agreed to hike the quota from 24,000 tons this year to 28,000 next year, with a further 4,000 added in each of the following two years. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because the decision has not been officially announced yet. click here to read the story 12:26

AquaBounty’s Stotish responds to Sobeys decision against selling GE salmon

Since the first genetically engineered salmon was sold in Canada this summer, retailers and environmental groups have stepped up their opposition to the product. After four years of review, the Canadian government declared GE salmon safe for consumption and allowed it to be sold in 2016. However, resistance has been growing,,, Retailers have responded, with Sobeys, which operates 15,000 stores across Canada, recently becoming the latest grocery chain in North America to declare that it will not be selling AquaBounty’s AquAdvantage salmon, after Loblaws and Metro declared they would not sell GE salmon earlier this year. click here to read the story 10:40

Perpetrators Who Caused the Death of 69 People Were Convicted in the Wreck of a Trawler in the Sea of ​​Okhotsk

Figures of the criminal case on the death of 69 people as a result of the crash of the Far East trawler in 2015 in the Sea of ​​Okhotsk were sentenced to long terms of imprisonment, the press service of the Prosecutor General’s Office told Interfax on Monday. “The court came to the conclusion that the accident and its consequences are caused by the change in the vessel’s ownership of the ship’s structures, its overload, and the presence of a minimal amount of fuel on board. Moreover, the ship lacked a sufficient number of hydrothermotics and life jackets,,, click here to read the story 10:10