Category Archives: International News

Panel Of Third Graders To Dictate Nation’s Climate Change Policy

At a panel on climate change held yesterday, the Senate brought in a group of excited third graders for ideas on fighting climate change. “These kids have ideas and they are passionate, so we must listen to them,” said Sen. Brian Schatz of Hawaii. “There are no possible downsides to taking kids who have been told the world is ending by the public school system and allowing them to dictate national policies on important issues.” The kids came up with the following list so far, though they say they’re “just spitballing” and the ideas need some fleshing out,, >click to read<

Pebble project permit application changes spark outrage

A decision by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to consider without additional public input recent changes in a Clean Water Act Section 404 permit application for the proposed Pebble mine in Southwest Alaska is sparking controversy anew Word spread after the USACE affirmed during a Sept. 17 media teleconference that there would be no additional public comment taken on 10 changes the Pebble Limited Partnership made to that application via a memo to the Corps. >click to read<  12:41

Hurricane Dorian ‘Totally Destroys’ 80% Of Fishing Industry

Fishermen yesterday said Hurricane Dorian had “totally destroyed” 80 percent of the industry in Abaco and Grand Bahama amid uncertainty over how the government will aid recovery. “Eighty percent of the fisheries sector in Grand Bahama and Abaco is totally destroyed. We’re not sure what the government will do to help us after Dorian,” said Keith Carroll, the Bahamas Commercial Fishers Alliance’s (BCFA) vice-chairman. >click to read< 10:38

Leo White: Comparing open-net to recirculatory fish farming

In his letter, Cyr Couturier claims that open-net pen (ONP) aquaculture is alive and well in Newfoundland and Labrador and everywhere else. Nothing could be further from the truth.,,, In Norway, the birthplace of ONP technology, it is not possible to even get a licence to establish a new salmon aquaculture farm.,,,licences for Recirculatory Aquaculture Systems (RAS), which are land-based, are free. Clearly in Norway RAS is seen as the future for farming Atlantic salmon. Meanwhile in N.L., access fees are negligible and salmon farmers pay nothing for the incredible damage and pollution they create. >click to read<  11:36

Don’t Call Me Lobster

After a long, dull day, the sun is finally breaking through the clouds as fisherman Graeme Hackworth hops off his tiny blue-and-white boat—named Freya after his granddaughter—and clambers up the stone quayside. Using a heavy rope, he hoists the first of three plastic baskets, each about the size of a large laundry tote, from the boat deck about five meters below.,,,  Never knowing how much he’ll catch is exactly what he likes about his job. “It’s different every day,” he explains. “It’s the excitement.”,,, >click to read<  08:57

New Adenia readies for sea after trip via Killybegs

The new Adenia tackled some harsh weather on her passage from Astilleros Zamakona’s yard in Pasaia, first to Killybegs to pick up gear, and thence to Whalsay. Skipper George Anderson, who is in partnership with his sons Stuart, Josie and Michael and fishing agents LHD, said that Adenia took the side-on bad weather, blowing to 30 knots on the first leg and 40 on the second, in her stride. photo’s, >click to read<  07:52

Bristol Bay Native Corporation to acquire two giants of Alaska’s Pacific cod fishery

Clipper Seafoods and Blue North Fisheries are freezer longline catchers, two giants of the Pacific cod industry. Clipper has six hook and line vessels, and after retiring one of its vessels, Blue North will have four. Now, the Bristol Bay Native Corporation is poised to acquire all of them. “Blue North and Clipper Seafoods, as of Friday last week, have officially merged together. And then BBNC’s intentions are to acquire the merged companies – the Blue North Clipper Group – on Sept. 30.” Audio,  >click to read< 18:20

How much fishing gear is lost at sea, worldwide?

The first ever estimate of commercial fishing gear lost in the world’s oceans has been published by CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency. Abandoned, lost or otherwise discarded fishing gear or ‘ghost gear’,,, Until now there has not been a clear global picture of the quantity and type of fishing gear lost worldwide.,,Using data from 68 studies Currently, much of the data on gear loss is from the United States and Europe, highlighting the need for more information about gear losses in the African, Asian, South American and Oceania regions. >click to read<  16:27

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 44’11”x21 Novi Lobster/Scalloper, Price reduced

Specifications, information and 45 photos >click here< To see all the boats in this series, >click here<

14:36

Five processors have monopoly on inshore fishery: FFAW-Unifor

Fish harvesters gathered in St. John’s Tuesday to speak out against what their union describes as the cartel-like behaviour of the province’s fish processing companies. FFAW-Unifor union says that, as a result of what it claims are co-ordinated efforts by some of the largest companies, who refused to buy species such as northern cod and squid for several weeks this season, harvesters are calling on the provincial government to issue new processing licences and develop a strategy to attract more competition and investment within the industry.  >click to read< 12:56

ACR Electronics Launches SM-3 Automatic Buoy Marker Light

ACR Electronics is introducing its new SM-3 Automatic Buoy Marker Light, a high-intensity LED strobe that provides brighter light in all directions for clear marking of a man-overboard site. Featuring industry-leading light weight, compact size and durability, the SM-3 provides 360° visibility for approximately 2 miles (3.22 km) and is ideal for any global commercial and leisure users requiring a reliable Crew Overboard (COB) marker light. When thrown in the water, the new ACR light automatically activates and rights itself to float upright in all conditions, strobing for over 24 hours,,, >click to read< 12:08

9 U.S. environmental groups seeking Canadian snow crab import ban, stronger right whale protections

“We do believe that, at this point, at least Canadian snow crab needs to be banned from the United States,” said Sarah Uhlemann, program director of the Seattle-based Center for Biological Diversity. Uhlemann was one of nine conservation groups who signed a letter sent Tuesday to the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) urging it to “press the Canadian government to immediately strengthen right whale protections, in order to avoid an import ban and to help save the species from extinction.”  >click to read< 07:35

We need a seal cull

There are over seven million harp seals that are devastating our marine life with each passing migration from the north, destroying valuable fish stocks and causing incalculable economic damage to the fishery and our province. The federal government has allowed this to go on for decades, and each successive government refuses to take any action on the exploding seal populations. We are now seeing the results of their inaction. Shrimp, crab, and cod stocks are disappearing at an alarming rate, while seals are never considered enough of a contributing factor. The government continues to set tokenized quotas that go unfilled. by Zack Best, >click to read<  18:48   We know our fishery and our waters. It’s time to protect them.

Toothfish research draws scientists, seafarers back for second Antarctic journey

Having broken the ice three years ago, a Nelson-based longliner is making a return voyage to the Antarctic to gain further insights into the world of toothfish. The Talley’s-owned FV Janas sailed last week to the northern Ross Sea region to carry out a winter scientific research survey. This is the second such trip for the Janas, having successfully completed a survey in the Ross Sea in 2016. During that trip, scientists and crew successfully fertilised Antarctic toothfish eggs, measured egg buoyancy of newly fertilised eggs, and collected wild eggs from plankton for the first time in history. >click to read< 14:28

President Trump! About our great Fishermen, our great Farmers and tariffs

President Trump, as we sit here listening to your arena chat with another strong crowd of support tonight (9-16-2019) in New Mexico, you once again brought up the nations farmers, I’d like to mention another group of outstanding, and hard working Americans, U.S. Commercial Fishermen, of whom many are your supporters that have been standing with you on the trade war. We have heard the praise of the Miners, and the Farmers, and its time for you to praise the Fishermen. >click to read< 11:31

The New Zealand fishing industry is fighting back against claims its newspaper advertising campaign is “spin”

It is true that the seafood industry is in fighting mode, as evidenced by a series of full-page ads we are running in the Dominion Post and the New Zealand Herald. However, there is a very good reason for that. Hundreds of small, family-owned fishing businesses are at stake if a review of the Hector’s and Māui dolphin Threat Management Plan sees tougher rules introduced.,, And for what? there has been no death of a Māui dolphin attributed to commercial fishing since 2002.,,,  the biggest threat to the Māui is not fishing. It’s toxoplasmosis, a parasitic disease found in cat faeces,,, >click to read< 09:36

Daniel Pauly’s Three Big Moves to Save the World’s Threatened Fisheries

In the last 60 years, globalization has transformed largely sustainable, small-scale local fishing enterprises into something very different. Now “largely corporate-owned and controlled” fleets subsidized by taxpayers roam the world’s oceans, depleting fish stocks either legally or illegally, Pauly says. Pauly’s pioneering and often provocative work has shed light on what the scientist calls “the toxic triad of fisheries” — the under-reporting of catches, overfishing and the tendency to blame depleted catches on “the environment.” >click to read<  17:04

New technology allows fleets to double fishing capacity—and deplete fish stocks faster – “This ‘technological creep’ is also ignored by most fisheries scientists in charge of proposing policies,” said Daniel Pauly, the Sea Around Us principal investigator. >click to read<  17:16

Humpy catch ends, coho opener wait for rain

“We still haven’t gotten a lot of rain, so we’re tracking behind in escapement and the (coho) commercial harvest is below anticipated,” said Jeremy Botz, gillnet area management biologist for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game in Cordova. “We had been fishing once a week and now we have been closed for more than a week.” The last opener for coho salmon was Sept. 2. >click to read< 12:59

A no-deal Brexit would likely end access for French boats to British waters

Sophie Leroy, whose Armement Cherbourgeois company operates three fishing vessels off the northwest coast of France, says there have been almost daily checks of their boats by the British authorities. Earlier this month, her boats were stopped for what she described as an interminable set of checks 21 miles off the English coast. Her boats were also surrounded by 15 British fishing vessels, she said. “And they were saying, ‘We are going to do the same as what the French did to us last year’. >click to read<  10:15

Legislators say Pebble mine could spark a cataclysmic mistake

Claims of Gov. Mike Dunleavy to a potential investor in the Pebble mine project that the state will actively help defend the project from “frivolous and scurrilous attacks” are drawing a sharp rebuttal from 20 Alaska legislators and the Bristol Bay Native Corp. In their Sept. 9 letter to Randy Smallwood, president and chief executive officer of Wheaton Precious Metals Corp., in Vancouver, British Columbia, the legislators said that while the mine “may provide some economic benefit to Alaska, it sits near the headwaters of the largest salmon run in the world. Dewatering and re-routing these headwaters could devastate our cherished resource, as would a single cataclysmic mistake.” >click to read<  13:28

13 years ago, the Nature Conservancy desperately wanted to protect groundfish. Now it wants you to eat them

In 2006, the crash of the groundfish population — bottom-dwelling fish like petrale sole, chilipepper rockfish and sand dabs that used to be common on Bay Area tables — led the Nature Conservancy to buy up 13 fishing permits and some California fishermen’s vessels. The state worked with a handful of the state’s remaining groundfish trawlers to change how they fish and protect vulnerable habitat. Now that groundfish populations have rebounded, the Nature Conservancy wants the public to know they’re OK to eat again. >click to read< (if you don’t get propaganda sick) 10:27

Nation’s first mega-offshore wind project stalled for additional study

On most afternoons in Point Judith, Rhode Island, commercial fisherman Brian Loftus steers his trawler back into port after a 12-hour day. Loftus unloaded some 1,500 pounds of whiting, scup, skate and squid. Estimated revenue: $3,000. Loftus has fished for three decades here, but to him there’s a looming problem: Offshore wind developers plan to plop turbines more than 70 stories high into his fishing grounds. >click to read< 08:46

Skipper appears in court after trawler is escorted to shore

The fishing trawler, the Mestre Bobicha, was escorted to Castletownbere by the LE Samual Beckett,where skipper Jose Ramon Perez Sampedro was charged with fishing with buoys that were not correctly marked, contrary to European fishery regulations. When the vessel was inspected, it was found to have several tonnes of blue shark on board. >click to read< 17:21

“Why I came to Alaska”, Israeli filmmaker documents fishing experience

The local seining industry is the star of a short video produced by Yonatan Belik, an Israeli filmmaker and traveler who spent the summer working as a skiffman in Kodiak. Belik, 29, said he happened upon Kodiak by chance. While hitchhiking in Israel, a stranger recommended he go fishing in Alaska.,,, Belik worked between June and August on the Abby Jo, a 37-foot seiner captained by Jake Organ. Organ grew up in Chugiak but has spent his summers fishing in Kodiak since his youth. At the age of 28, this is Organ’s first summer as captain. >click to read<  12:58

The Hamptons love green energy. But that wind farm?

This affluent enclave on the East End of Long Island is steeped in eco-conscious pride, with strict water quality and land preservation rules and an abundance of electric cars on the roads. So at first, many happily embraced a plan for an offshore wind farm that would help lead the way as New York State sets some of the most ambitious green energy goals in the country. But then came word that the project’s transmission cable was going to land in Wainscott, one of the most exclusive slices of the already exclusive Hamptons, where homeowners include the likes of the cosmetics billionaire Ronald Lauder and Marci Klein, a former longtime producer of “Saturday Night Live” and the daughter of Calvin Klein. >click to read< 08:21

Hurricane Dorian: Governor Cooper requests major disaster declaration for NC counties

North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper requested a major disaster declaration from President Trump’s office Friday. The disaster declaration covers Brunswick, Carteret, Craven, Currituck, Dare, Duplin, Hyde, New Hanover, Pamlico, Pender, Sampson, Tyrrell and Washington counties and would trigger FEMA assistance. >click to read< 18:01 North Carolina’s Disaster Relief Fund approaches $6 million>click to read<

FISH-NL – Which Side Are You On?

Click the image to play the video! 14:18

LePage And The Whales

Fisheries managers from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are developing new rules that are likely to fall heavily on the lobster industry in New England, especially in Maine, where fishing activity is greatest.,,, Maine’s lobstermen and lobsterwomen found an ally in former Gov. Paul LePage, who recently wrote an op-ed in The Wall Street Journal decrying the proposed rules as misdirected and unnecessary. >click to read<  13:14

Bahamas: Hurricane Dorian impact a “big setback” for fishing industry

Bahamian fishermen fear that Hurricane Dorian’s destruction in the northern Bahamas will result in the fishing industry losing as much as 30 to 40 per cent in revenue, with the Bahamas Commercial Fishers Alliance (BCFA) vice-president saying “it’s going to be a big setback for the industry”. Keith Carroll told Eyewitness News that at least 95 per cent of fishermen in the northern Bahamas have lost their boats.  >click to read< 11:34

“We’re gonna bomb your bleeping ships”, You understand me? – Coast Guard seeks tips for threatening radio broadcast

The Coast Guard is seeking information regarding a person making threats and hoax calls on marine band radio off the gulf coast of Florida. Coast Guard Sector St. Petersburg command center received the latest threat on Aug. 13, 2019 via VHF channel 22A. In this call, the male caller makes threats against the Coast Guard personnel, aircrafts and vessels. The broadcast sounds like the same person who has made other radio broadcasts that start with MAYDAY three times and then talks about, “scrambling all jets we are under nuclear attack.” >click to read, listen< 13:43