Category Archives: International News

“A privilege to grow old”: Trawler survivor writes book

Ten years after the Sea Rogue prawn trawler sunk, survivor Michael Williams said it is a privilege to get to grow old. Mr Williams has announced that he is releasing a spoken-word poetry book about the tragic events that unfolded, beginning on February 27, 2008.  That fateful day, Mr Williams swam for 10 hours and more than 16kms, after the prawn trawler sunk when its net was caught on the below reef.  Mr Williams told The Daily Examiner in 2014 that crew members John Jarratt (JJ), Alan “Charlie” Picton and himself all had to swiftly escape out of the cabin window. All they had was a red tub to cling onto. >click to read<15:51

Uninformed vs. Science: The story of swordfish in the Northwest Atlantic is complex and subject to many versions of revisionist histories.

Every once in a while you read something that is so wrong, it sticks with you. A recent statement by the American Sportfish Association, (ASA), published in the Fishing Wire, met and exceeded the mark of just plain wrong. And to compound the affront, several marginalized groups threw in their support for good measure. I know better than to bark at the moon but here goes,,,Uninformed vs. Science. By Edward Gaw >click to read< 14:53

How To Butcher a Whole Tuna: Every Cut of Fish Explained

Yuji Haraguchi is a butcher and owner of the fish market Osakana. In this episode of Beautiful Butchery, Haraguchi shows Bon Appétit how to butcher a whole tuna and explains every cut of fish you would see at sushi restaurants. He breaks down the tuna into back loin, belly loin, pelvic fins, bones, and collars. From there, the cuts are broken down into saku blocks, sashimi, toro, chu-toro, sinews, sankaku, akami, tuna tartare, and aburi. >click to watch<12:34

The Dying Art of Fishing for Shrimp on Horseback

Dominique Vandendriessche has shrimp fishing in his blood. Now in his twenties, Vandendriessche lives and works on the Belgian coast, in the small town of Oostduinkerke, where he is one of the last fishermen alive who catches shrimp from the back of a horse. As a little boy, he says, he accompanied his parents to the shore and watched as his father, Johan, made his way into the waves on the back of a towering Belgian draft horse. Now, Vandendriessche is carrying on the family profession, accompanied by his horse, Jim. >click to read<20:36

The phytoplankton decline, is there anything to it?

We have been told that the phytoplankton population is declining rapidly around the world and, of course, the cause is climate change. Phytoplankton is the base of the ocean food chain and it accounts for about half of global primary productivity or organic matter creation (Boyce, Lewis and Worm 2010). Phytoplankton is the major consumer of carbon dioxide, the dreaded demon trace gas, and the major producer of oxygen. So, first question, is the estimated decline in phytoplankton accurate, significant or unusual? Second question, if the decline is real, are the measurements long term enough to show it is not a natural occurrence? What is the natural variability and how do we know man-made climate change is to blame? Let’s investigate this. >click to read< 12:10

A conversation with Patrick Moore

Patrick Moore is a Canadian activist, and former president of Greenpeace Canada. Since leaving Greenpeace, which he helped to found, Moore has criticized the environmental movement for what he sees as scare tactics and disinformation, saying that the environmental movement “abandoned science and logic in favor of emotion and sensationalism.” He has sharply and publicly differed with many policies of major environmental groups, including Greenpeace itself on other issues including forestry, biotechnology, aquaculture, and the use of chemicals for many applications. >click to read< 14:31

Prince Edward Island fisherman sails Arctic as modern-day explorer

Few have logged more nautical miles in Canada’s Arctic over the past six years than David MacIsaac. But the northward course of the modern-day Arctic exploring captain has been a wandering one. MacIsaac was supposed to be an accountant. At least, that’s what he was studying at university 30 years ago when his dad called. David MacIsaac Sr., long a crewman, had bought a lobster licence and gear and was offering his son a job. Like his father, David found physical satisfaction in working on the water. >click to read< The series, Our Changing Arctic: Part 1>click to read<12:06

U.S. States Slow Trump’s Offshore Drilling Expansion Plan

The Trump administration’s plan to broadly expand drilling in U.S. offshore waters is moving slowly due to opposition from coastal states and indifference from oil companies that have turned their focus to other opportunities. The administration hopes encouraging U.S. energy development outside of shale oilfields will further its goal of “energy dominance.” But existing Obama administration lease rules remain in place through 2022 unless the new rules gain approval. The Department of the Interior this year proposed opening vast new acreage in the U.S. outer continental shelf to drilling. >click to read< 08:56

“mansplaining” – John McDonnell channels Justin Trudeau by referring to ‘fisherpeople’ instead of fishermen

John McDonnell, Labour’s shadow chancellor, appeared to be channeling his inner Justin Trudeau yesterday when he referred to British fishermen as “fisherpeople” during a television interview. Labour’s shadow chancellor spoke of the need to protect the interests of British fishing fleets after Brexit, employing the unfamiliar phrase which drew comparisons to the Canadian Prime Minister. Mr Trudeau, notorious for his careful and sometimes strange use of language, recently told a young woman that she should refer to “peoplekind” instead of “mankind”, a decision he was criticsed for. >click to read< 11:24

Coroner calls for compulsory EPIRBs after Returner tragedy

A Coronor has implored maritime authorities to make it compulsory for all fishing vessels to carry water-activated EPIRB devices, following an inquest into the sinking of the prawn trawler Returner off the WA coast which claimed the lives of skipper Murray Turner and deckhands Chad Fairley and Mason Carter. The findings of last year’s coronial investigation into the tragic sinking in July 2015 were released today, with coroner Sarah Linton concluding that a lack of stability of the trawler, which had undergone extensive modifications prior to setting out, had caused the vessel to capsize and those aboard to drown. >click to read< 09:58

Fukushima’s fishing industry stuck in slow but steady battle to change public perceptions after 3/11

Since the March 2011 nuclear crisis, fishery workers in Fukushima Prefecture have had the unprecedented and daunting task of convincing consumers that local fish are safe to eat. Fishing has resumed on a “trial” basis and the catches are gradually increasing. But seven years on, radiation checks are now part of their routine before shipping the fish to markets. Japan has a cuisine culture that is often synonymous with sushi overseas, and consumers value not just the safety but the freshness of seafood. >click to read< 13:14

Seven Years After Tsunami, Japanese Live Uneasily With Seawalls – When a massive earthquake struck in 2011, Japanese oyster fisherman Atsushi Fujita was working as usual by the sea. Soon after, a huge black wave slammed into his city and killed nearly 2,000 people.>click to read<

Maine Fishermen of baby eels expect high price as stocks dry up on the international market

Members of Maine’s baby-eel fishing industry are expecting high prices for the tiny fish this year because of a shortage on the international market, and sushi lovers could end up feeling the pinch. Maine is the only U.S. state with a significant fishery for baby eels, or elvers. The tiny, translucent eels are sold to Asian aquaculture companies to be raised to maturity for use as food.,,, The fishery is a source of reliable income in rural Maine. Julie Keene, an elver fishermen based in Lubec, is looking forward to a good harvest this year. >click to read<11:19

Fish Farming – Bio-security for Fish Rearing: Re-circulating Aquaculture Systems

Re-circulating Aquaculture is a technique for raising water borne animals in a closed (usually indoor) system which minimizes water consumption, provides maximum control of the livestock’s environment, and reduces the risk of exposure to parasites, disease, and predators High Density Re-circulating Aquaculture System (HDRAS) is a system in which aquatic organisms are cultured in water which is serially reconditioned and reused. Closed-system aquaculture presents a new and expanding commercial opportunity. Re-circulating aquaculture systems (RAS) are tank-based systems in which fish can be grown at high density under controlled environmental conditions. They are closed-loop facilities that retain and treat the water within the system. >click to read<09:33

New ‘Wicked Tuna’ season starts Sunday!

National Geographic Channel launches its seventh season of “Wicked Tuna” this Sunday, March 11, at 9 p.m., with an extended 90-minute episode. The new season finds the captains in need of redemption. Beverly resident Capt. Dave Marciano of the Hard Merchandise is out to turn things around after a disappointing season in Gloucester last year, in which he caught only five fish. Over on the Hot Tuna, Capt. TJ Ott had a dismal season in the Outer Banks. Meanwhile, Capt. Tyler McLaughlin of the Pinwheel is armed with a new boat and a skilled mate. >click to read< 11:04

N.L.’s fish and seafood production dips in 2017

The value of Newfoundland and Labrador’s total fish and seafood production exceeded $1-billion for the third year in a row in 2017 but is down 10 per cent from 2016. The production value for last year was almost $1.3 billion. The provincial government has released its 2017 Seafood Industry Year in Review document. It attributes the decline to a lower market value in both the commercial wild fishery and the aquaculture sector. >click to read<20:02

The 2017 Seafood Industry Year in Review >click to read<

F/V Nancy Glen recovery mission launched

Tarbert fishermen Duncan MacDougall, 46, and Przemek Krawczyk, 38, lost their lives when the boat sank in Loch Fyne on January 18. Their bodies are still believed to be inside the boat. A third crewman, John Miller, 34, also from Tarbert, survived after being rescued by a passing vessel. The Nancy Glen is lying at a depth of 140 metres and the Scottish Government has contracted salvage experts to try and lift the boat high enough to allow divers to search inside.>click to read<08:53

NOAA’s New Marine Forecast Product Improves Weather Forecasts and Safety at Sea

NOAA’s Ocean Prediction Center (OPC) rolled out a new forecast product suite this week to provide mariners with comprehensive weather forecasts every 24 hours out to day four. Our goal is to deliver the very best impact-based decision support services and products possible to our users. These 72 hour surface weather and wind/wave forecast charts, and model generated 500 mb charts, will allow mariners to better prepare for severe weather at sea. >click to read<08:38

Gloucester again at center of drilling fight, along with everyone from every coast.

In the late-1970s, an unlikely alliance between environmentalists and commercial fishermen in this storied seaport helped block plans to open up Georges Bank to oil exploration — an effort that ultimately led to a federal moratorium on offshore drilling. Georges Bank, a shallow and turbulent fish spawning ground southeast of Cape Ann and 100 miles east of Cape Cod, has been fished for more than 350 years.,,, In Gloucester, those who fought similar efforts a generation ago are confident the city can again win a David vs. Goliath battle with energy companies. >click to read< The non-stop articles about the opposition to drilling is overwhelming. No one wants it. Wind farms are the real threat.  14:05

An Agenda Driven Study: Marine charities net more than iconic fishery

Massachusetts boasts one of the most iconic fisheries in the U.S., but new research suggests that protecting marine coastlines has surpassed commercial fishing as an economic driver.  The study is the first to calculate the economic value of coastal preservation in Massachusetts. The research finds these efforts contributed $179 million to the state’s economy in 2014, more than finfish landings ($105 million) and whale-watching ($111 million). “Marine conservation has become a major economic force in Massachusetts,,, (It is an industry of destruction.) >click to read< 12:27

Coast Guard responders “harmed by chemicals used to clean up BP’s spill”

Sometimes, there is absolutely nothing worse than being proven right. It is the one thing you dreaded. Ever since the horrendous Deepwater Horizon spill in 2010, I and many others warned against using the toxic chemical called Corexit arguing that it would do more damage than good. The potential evidence of harm, or lack of evidence of its safety, was clear for everyone from BP to the US Government to see to if they had bothered to look. Nearly one million gallons of the dispersant was dropped by air and a further 770,000 gallons injected into the well head to try and disperse in excess of 200 million gallons of oil that was spilt by BP in the Gulf of Mexico. >click to read<13:21

Ray Hilborn: New study provides no new information on global fishing footprint

University of Washington fisheries researcher Ray Hilborn said that a new study using satellite data from industrial fishing vessels to map global fishing effort fails to provide any new insight, despite media reports indicating otherwise. The study, published in Science in February, used messages transmitted between 2012 and 2016 from the automatic identification systems (AIS) of more than 70,000 industrial fishing vessels to create a global footprint, concluding that “industrial fishing occurs in over 55 percent of ocean area,” according to the abstract. But Hilborn said the vessels monitored for the study were in large part tuna boats over 100 feet, which have been monitored for decades. >click to read< 11:17

An example of activism, and how to get your point across

A freelance writer Frederick Hewett, from Cambridge Ma wrote a piece about the wonderful wind advantage the Bay State has, Massachusetts Could Win Big In Offshore Wind Energy. The article was posted on the WBUR website, licensed by the Trustees of Boston University. The piece describes what the wind industry repeats continuously, that its just Utopia! Barbara Durkin, a citizen that is opposed to wind energy for all the right reasons commented on the article, and with every comment included information to back up her claims. As fishermen are opposed to offshore wind, offshore drilling, and the emotional issue of the right whale, it is a lesson on how to get your point across with dignity, and knowledge. >click to read< Her tag line on twitter is, “Show me the evidence that wind energy works….still waiting” Follow her on twitter>click here<14:35

Brexit-supporting Fishermen Worried May Will Sell Them out After ‘30 Years of Torment that Seemed Neverending’

Fishing for Leave, the grassroots fishing industry campaign for Brexit which organised the seaborne protest which turned into the (in)famous Battle of the Thames, expressed concern after the Remain-supporting prime minister signalled fishing would form part of Britain’s “economic partnership” with the European Union. The lion’s share of Western Europe’s fish are in British territorial waters, but EU member-states are required to surrender control over their fisheries — like their trade policy — to Brussels, which has resulted in a massive reduction in “fishing effort” as British stocks have been doled out to other EU member-states. Talk of reduced “fishing effort” is a euphemism for massive job losses,,, >click to read<11:09

‘Wild West’: Controversy dogs Nova Scotia’s marine brokerage industry

A fisherman from Shelburne County says he will fight a lawsuit from a marine broker seeking a $38,000 commission on the sale of a boat and lobster licence. Donnie Roy, a lobster fisherman who lives near Lockeport, N.S., paid a commission to brokers in the sale of his lobster licence and vessel, Justified Expense. Now another marine brokerage, Novi Marine Brokers of Yarmouth, is suing Roy, demanding $38,000 in commissions because Roy had also signed a listing agreement with the company. The dispute raises questions about the unregulated marine brokerage industry in this province, which is involved in the sale of fishing boats and licences in the tens of millions of dollars every year in Nova Scotia.>click to read<10:35

Fishermen lodge class action over toxic dredge spill

A Class action is being brought against Gladstone Ports Corporation on behalf of commercial fishermen for losses they say resulted from large-scale contamination from toxic dredge spill in 2011-12.  The fishermen are claiming losses of more than $100million following the Western Basin Dredging and Disposal Project in Gladstone Harbour. The dredging began in 2011 to prepare for the three Curtis Island LNG projects. >click to read<

Graying of Alaska’s Fishing Fleet Puts Key Industry in Peril

Once known for its young guns, Alaska’s commercial fishing fleet is now full of graybeards. The average Alaska fisher is now older than 50, according to the University of Alaska’s Sea Grant program. That is a big change from 1975, when fishers under 40 held half of commercial fishing permits in rural Alaska.,,, At the heart of the problem, experts have concluded, is “rationalization,” the system that has transformed Alaska fisheries from an open-access free-for-all into tightly managed harvests governed by quota shares and “limited-entry” permits that must be inherited or purchased – with prices that can soar well above $100,000. >click to read< 09:00

The fish that built Lofoten

In the far north of Nordland county, the Lofoten Islands stretch out into the Norwegian Sea like a row of teeth. Ever since the Viking Age, the islands have played an important role in fishing for the Norwegian Arctic cod or “Skrei” (pronounced ‘skrey’), which come here to spawn in the winter months. The fishing industry has left many a mark in the history of Lofoten, and is still important for people who live out here. >click to read< 18:25

Millions of dead fish wash up on Yorkshire beach after Storm Emma

Millions of dead fish and sea creatures washed up on Yorkshire’s East Coast over the weekend. Tidal waves and gale force winds from Storm Emma are believed to have caused the “huge dump of animals”,,, Commercial fisherman Jack Sanderson was at Fraisthorpe with a group of fishermen rescuing live lobsters to release back into the sea. “It was just like a war zone, total chaos,” said Sanderson. “We have had strong easterly winds up to force nine and combined with a 6.2 metre tide, and the fact there was a lot of cold, frost and snow, meant the water temperature dropped two degrees in one day, which is massive.” >click to read< 11:37

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“Michelle Malkin Investigates: Fishing Wars ” Takes HIIDA Best Documentary of the Month

BEST OF THE MONTH “Michelle Malkin Investigates: Fishing Wars ” will take home this beautiful HIIDA Trophy during the Award Ceremony on March 24, 2018. A monthly film festival with a yearly live screening at Raleigh Studios, Hollywood exclusively for Documentaries.  All monthly Winners of 2017 will be invited to attend the Mega Red Carpet HIIDA Award Ceremony Event held on March 24, 2018, @ Raleigh Studios Hollywood. >click to read< Michell appeared on Fox and Friends this morning and it is also discussed, >watch here<09:31