Category Archives: National

Sea to Table: Bringing the Bounty of the Sea to You With Meghan Lapp, and Michael Gambardella

Open to the public and free of charge. For more information, please contact the Town of Stonington Economic Development Commission at 860-235-9180. The La Grua Center is located at 32 Water St., Stonington, CT.  lagruacenter.org 22:37

Waste not, want not: Would you wear shoes made of fish?

A look at Jamie-Lee Cormier’s brightly coloured leather earrings and bracelets reveals something unexpected: the leather has scales. That’s because it’s made with Newfoundland cod leather. “Everyone’s always really amazed when they see it,” said the crafts producer who sells her products online. Though it may seem weird to Cormier’s Canadian customers, fish leather has been making a splash on international runways for a few years. Christian Dior, Prada and Nike have all been experimenting with fish leather products, from shoes to handbags. It’s part of a growing worldwide movement to reduce waste in commercial fisheries and to make more money using less fish. Biodiesel made from seal oil? click here to read the story 10:49

Shadow markets mask the size of China’s demand for lobster

The Chinese appetite for North American lobster is well known and getting bigger every year, but it may be twice as big as previously believed. That’s because there is a lot more lobster ending up on Chinese dinner plates than what Canada and the U.S. send over. Researchers think there is even more North American lobster being traded along indirect and sometimes shadowy routes through other places in Asia, like Hong Kong and Vietnam, that eventually ends up as luxury eats for China’s growing middle class. click here to read the story 09:54

Brad Gentner: It’s time to rethink ‘catch shares’

Catch shares in marine fisheries is a concept unfamiliar to most people, and it is probably completely alien to most hunters and anglers in this country. It is a system of wildlife management that bestows some percentage of a public marine resource, like red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico, to private businesses for free, to use and sell for their own profit. It was thought that by giving away ownership rights to individuals, the fishery would consolidate and ultimately become easier to manage. While the same number of fish would be caught, the benefits of funneling access to the resource through fewer entities was thought to remove some of the uncertainty in the industry and thus would be worth the price of privatizing a public resource for free. While catch shares are still the darling of some fisheries economists, there is a growing backlash against this management tool worldwide for a variety of reasons. At the heart of these complaints is fleet and wealth consolidation, extraction of public wealth for private profit, and failure to capitalize share-cost into production costs. click here to read the op-ed 21:46

Scania powers up its marine engine range

Scania is launching a new six-cylinder 13-liter inline marine engine. The new engine, which combines new power levels ranging from 650 to 925 hp with reduced fuel consumption, consolidates Scania’s position as a leader in power-to-weight ratio. The engine is the second platform in Scania’s marine engine portfolio to use common rail XPI fuel injection technology to reach higher power levels and lower fuel consumption. XPI technology was first introduced in Scania’s marine engine range in 2015 when the 1,150 hp V8 engine was launched. However, the system has been used in its engines for trucks and industrial applications since 2007; As well as lowering fuel consumption and noise levels, the common-rail XPI fuel injection system also gives a faster engine response and a quicker torque build-up. The first appearance of the new, and powerful 13-liter engine will be on display at the Lobster Boat Races in Stonington, ME on July 9, 2017. click here to read the story 17:36

NOAA Officials May Be Illegally Deleting Skype and Google Chat conversations

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) might illegally be destroying records of a recent meeting discussing new regulations against the fishing industry, according to a conservative legal group in Washington, D.C. Cause of Action Institute (CoA) filed a lawsuit Wednesday against the NOAA to obtain communications during a New England Fishery Management Council meeting hashing out new rules foisted upon the country’s fishing industry. The group believes the agency is deleting Skype and Google Chat conversations that took place during the April meeting. The NOAA General Counsel considers communications through Google Chat to be off the record and will not be recorded anyway, according to a 2012 handbook guide CoA obtained. CoA disputed the agency’s claim, and pointed to provisions within the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA). The NARA, which maintains government records, states that any communications created on NOAA’s Gmail interface qualify under the Federal Records Act. CoA Institute requested e-mails, instant messaging, Google chat messages, text messages, and any Skype messages NOAA employees sent during the April 18–20, 2017 NEFMC meetings. click here to read the story 16:32

Webber designs on board net washing system

There’s nothing that catches fish better than a brand new net. If you can maintain a clean net you’re fully optimizing your ability to catch. Bill Webber runs Webber Marine and Manufacturing in Cordova, which specializes in the salmon gillnet arena. The net washer is one of the newest tools to come out of his shop. It essentially has vertical water chambers that weld onto the outboard sides of the rollers. The rollers still function as intended and they roll as the net goes through them. On the front and the back of this level line there’s vertical water jet holes in the water columns that spray at each other and through the net as it goes through the level lines. click here to read the story 15:27

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 58′ Fiberglass Shrimper, Twin 3406B Cat’s, Izusu 8 KW Genset

Specifications, information and 7 photos click here To see all the boats in this series, Click here 11:51

On This day, July 4, 1776

That sky keeps on falling. Apparently the anti-fishing foundation funding doesn’t follow suit.

Nils Stolpe FishNet-USA – “New research shows that industrial fisheries are responsible for dumping nearly 10 million tons of perfectly good fish back into the ocean each year—enough to fill 4,500 Olympic-sized swimming pools. This news comes at a time when nearly 90 percent of the world’s fish stocks are threatened by overfishing.” (click here) This is from the latest bit of “fishing is ruining the oceans” alarmism, this time in a paper published in Fish and fisheries reporting on research funded by the Pew connected Sea Around Us. Sounds kind of awful, doesn’t it? Thousands of “Olympic-sized” swimming pools filled to the brim with dead and dying fish and shellfish, totally wasted and evidently rotting in the sun. But as is so often the case, with a little bit of perspective the truth isn’t anywhere nearly as catastrophic as the anti-fishing claque would have you believe. click here to read the story 09:46

Fish becoming transgender from contraceptive pill, chemicals being flushed down household drains

A fifth of male fish are now transgender because of chemicals from the contraceptive pill being flushed down household drains, a study by has suggested. Male river fish are displaying feminised traits and even producing eggs, the study found. The chemicals causing these effects include ingredients in the contraceptive pill, by-products of cleaning agents, plastics and cosmetics, according to the findings. More than 200 chemicals from sewage plants have been identified with oestrogen-like effects and drugs such as antidepressants are also altering fish’s natural behaviour, his study found. “Other research has shown that many other chemicals that are discharged through sewage treatment works can affect fish, including antidepressant drugs that reduce the natural shyness of some fish species, including the way they react to predators,” Professor Tyler said. click here to read the story 19:55

Naknek-Kvichak fishermen eagerly await the 16 million sockeye run to show

With just 100,000 sockeye counted as harvest, and 65,000 counted as escapement, skippers and crew play the waiting game in Bristol Bay’s largest fishing district. The Naknek-Kvichak district had a couple openers earlier this week with not a lot of promise. While fish are coming in at record breaking numbers in the Nushigak, skippers in the Naknek-Kvichak are playing the game of ‘hurry up and wait.’ Boats are anchored and lined up at the Naknek Silver Bay Seafoods dock Thursday afternoon. Skippers and crew are working on last minute repairs…some are playing cards, reading books, napping. The overall sentiment is disappointment from the last two openers. Audio report, click here listen/read 09:43

Seismic blasting, oil & gas drilling in Atlantic? Now’s the time to comment

The public is now being asked to comment on the president’s proposal to open up the Atlantic and all other federal offshore planning areas for potential oil and gas drilling. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and President Donald Trump announced Thursday that the 45-day public comment period on a new Five-Year National Offshore Oil and Gas Leasing Program on the Outer Continental Shelf will begin Monday. The comment period will close Aug. 17. To comment on the proposed Five-Year National Offshore Oil and Gas Leasing Program: click here to read the story, scroll down page for instructions. 08:43

Nils Stolpe, Fishnet USA – So how are we doing? (2017 edition) A Report on our Domestic Commercial Fishing Industry

I occasionally share my impressions of how the domestic commercial fishing industry is doing, using as my primary data source the NMFS online database “Annual Commercial Landing Statistics” (click here). We are fortunate to have these extensive records of commercial landings of fish and shellfish in the United States extending back to 1950 because they allow a fairly comprehensive view of long term industry (and resource) trends. Among the most useful statistics are those dealing with the value and weight of the total landings for each year. Together they give an overview of how the domestic fishing industry is progressing (or regressing) from year to year. Click here to read the report 11:49

Massachusetts Appeals Court Upholds Applicability of WPA to Commercial Fishing Techniques Using Hydraulic Dredging Methods

The Massachusetts Appeals Court upheld the applicability of the state’s Wetlands Protection Act (WPA) to commercial fishing activities using hydraulic dredging methods on land under ocean and nearshore areas, clarifying municipal authority to impose additional requirements on activities in wetlands in relation to shell fishing.  However, in the same opinion, the Court concluded that a town bylaw prohibiting hydraulic dredging in nearshore areas without a permit is preempted by state law as applied to sea clam and quahog harvesting. In Aqua King Fishery, the Conservation Commission of Provincetown alleged that Aqua King Fishery, LLC violated both Provincetown’s Wetlands Bylaw and the WPA when it failed to obtain the Commission’s approval for the use of hydraulic dredge fishing gear for commercial sea clam fishing near Provincetown’s shore. click here to read the story 16:22

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 45′ Solid Fiberglass Lobster/Dive boat, 750HP John Deere

Specifications, information and 12 photos click here Vessel was built new 2016 by Long Beach Boat Building Ltd in Nova Scotia and was finished by Dana’s Boat Shop in Westport, ME. To see all the boats in this series, Click here 12:04

Dakota Creek Industries trying to make things right in eyes of Congress

Dakota Creek Industries owner Mike Nelson and his staff have been looking for ways to appease federal lawmakers following the mistake the company made in building the $75 million fishing vessel America’s Finest. The mistake — using too much foreign-formed steel in the vessel’s hull — requires a waiver from the U.S. Congress in order for the ship to fish domestically. The waiver would be for the Jones Act, which requires domestic fishing vessels be built in the U.S. These days, Nelson glances frequently at his cell phone hoping for good news concerning his company’s lobbying efforts in Washington, D.C. click here to read the story 12:12

NOAA opens public comment period – National Marine Sanctuaries and Marine National Monuments

NOAA opens public comment period on Sec. 4(b) in Executive Order 13795 focused on National Marine Sanctuaries and Marine National Monuments NOAA is soliciting comment on National Marine Sanctuaries and Marine National Monuments designated or expanded since April 28, 2007, during a 30-day public comment period, which will open June 26, 2017, to assist the Secretary of Commerce in his review under section 4(b) of the Presidential Executive Order (EO) 13795, “Implementing an America-First Offshore Energy Strategy” (signed April 28, 2017). There are a total of six National Marine Sanctuaries expanded and five Marine National Monuments designated or expanded since April 28, 2007, that are a part of this review (see table 1). NOAA is asking the public to focus their comments, for this 30-day comment period, on those criteria outlined in Section 4(b)(i) of EO 13795: Click here to read the notice. 15:47

Trump Gave A Speech That Has The Wind Industry Terrified

Wind industry officials scrambled to fend off President Donald Trump’s criticism of wind turbines during his speech Wednesday night. “I don’t want to just hope the wind blows to light up your homes and your factories,” Trump told supporters at a rally in Iowa. “As the birds fall to the ground.” Trump’s comments triggered a response from the CEO of the country’s largest wind energy lobbying group, the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA). CEO Tom Kiernan published a series of tweets to push back against Trump’s critiques of wind power. ( of course, we will never see the carnage at offshore wind farms, as sea birds will simply disappear into the ocean. What a scam!) click here to read the story 17:34

Before You Eat That Red Snapper: The Fish Is Basically Plagued by Endless Fraud

Welcome to Before You Eat That, which broaches all the annoying food subjects that make you highly uncomfortable. This is for all you schadenfreude-obsessed killjoys out there. So far, we’ve covered the continuing saga of all things seafood: The is-it-too-smart-to-eat octopus, the oyster and its massive gonad, the sad plight of the disappearing freshwater eel, and now onward to the magnet for all things fraud, Red Snapper. Red snapper is one hell of a divisive fish. Among Texas anglers, big-time regulations make it a contentious subject between recreational and commercial factions. Among restaurants in America, the Congressional Research Service reported in 2015, 77 percent of red snapper being served in the country was not actually red snapper at all,,, Click here to read the article 21:11

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 36′ Northern Bay Lobster (Balsa Cored), 6 Cylinder John Deere

Specifications, information and 16 photo’s click here -Also available is a Federal Area 1 Lobster Permit available for an additional $ 45,000.00.  In addition, there are traps and gear available separate of the vessel.  To see all the boats in this series, Click here 12:55

Coast Guard medevacs Fisherman man with ankle injury near Shelikof Strait, Alaska

A Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew medevaced a 58-year-old man with an ankle injury from a fishing vessel in the vicinity of Shelikof Strait, Alaska, Sunday.  The Jayhawk crew safely hoisted the man and transported him to awaiting EMS personnel in Kodiak. Watchstanders at the Coast Guard Sector Anchorage command center received a medevac request from the New Dawn crew for a crewmember with a broken ankle. Watchstanders requested the launch of the Jayhawk crew after consulting the duty flight surgeon who recommended medevac of the crewmember. Click here for video 18:06

Chris Oliver Appointed to Lead NOAA Fisheries

Today, Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross, with concurrence from the White House, named Chris Oliver Assistant Administrator for NOAA Fisheries. The Texas native assumed his new position on June 19, taking the helm from Acting Assistant Administrator Samuel Rauch who will return to his position as the Deputy Assistant Administrator for Regulatory Programs.,,, Oliver most recently served as Executive Director of the North Pacific Fishery Management Council, a position he held for the past 16 years. He has been with the Council since 1990, also serving as a fisheries biologist and then deputy director. During his tenure as executive director he led the way on several cutting edge management initiatives, including development of limited access privilege programs and fishery cooperatives and catch share programs, the North Pacific’s comprehensive onboard observer program, numerous bycatch reduction programs, extensive habitat protection measures, commercial and recreational allocation programs, and coastal community development programs. He was also responsible for all administrative and operational aspects of the Council process, and lead staffer for legislative and international issues. click here to read the press release 11:32

Conflicts of Interest Plague Fishery Councils

In a tremendous display of arrogance, Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council member David Walker of Alabama went on a rant at the June meeting of the Gulf Council in which he proclaimed that millionaire shareholders like himself are the only ones who contribute anything to the red snapper fishery. He was referring to the paltry 3 percent administrative fee that shareholders are required to pay to cover the expense of the catch share program that has made him rich. The fact that NOAA Fisheries acknowledges the fee doesn’t even cover the cost of the program (the shortfall is picked up by taxpayers like you and me) did not deter Walker from his outlandish claims. He went on to challenge recreational anglers to show what they contribute.,, The end result of efforts by groups like the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) to privatize public marine resources was on full display at this meeting. They may not have intended it, but EDF and their allies have created an entire class of spoiled, entitled bullies, ready to intimidate anyone who threatens their domain, from Council members to Congressmen. Click here to read the story 14:35

On this special day, take time to thank your dad

Father’s Day – which is Sunday – almost seems to be an afterthought, compared to Mother’s Day. It’s like someone said, “We ought to do Father’s Day, too. It’ll give us a chance to sell some shirts and ties.” Father’s Day began in Europe around 1500 as St. Joseph’s Day, honoring the earthly father of Jesus. Spanish and Portuguese Catholics brought the tradition to the New World. Moms are important. They did carry us around for nine months … but Dad had something to do with that, too. Some fathers aren’t very good fathers, and others aren’t around at all, but a good dad is a treasure and can influence our lives in a way that we might not realize until he is no longer around to thank him. click here to read the story, and Happy Fathers Day.

Matt Bradley Of ‘Deadliest Catch’ Shows That Recovery From Addiction Is Possible No Matter What

Although I’m in long term recovery and I work in the treatment industry, I still encounter people whose recovery amazes me. Matt Bradley is one of those people. Matt caught my attention when I saw him on an episode of Deadliest Catch. He’s a fisherman who has crewed with Northwestern for over a decade. What intrigued me wasn’t just the drama and action of the fishing crew, but Matt’s openness and honesty about his struggle with substance use. A long time drug user, Matt didn’t encounter the serious consequences that so many people face until he was in his 20s. Although he grew up with normalized drug use—-stealing joints and alcohol from the adults in his Section 8 housing development—-he didn’t really think he had a problem until he started using heroin. click here to read the story 15:40

Zinke moving dozens of senior Interior Department officials in shake-up

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is reassigning dozens of top career officials within his ranks, a shake-up that appears to be the start of a broad reorganization of a department that manages one-fifth of all land within the United States. The decision to move members of the Senior Executive Service (SES) is legally permitted only after a political appointee has been in office for 120 days; Zinke won’t reach that mark until June 28.,,,The officials who received notices include Interior’s top climate policy official, Joel Clement, who directs the Office of Policy Analysis, as well as at least five senior officials of the Fish and Wildlife Service — nearly a quarter of that agency’s career SES staff. click here to read the story 18:46

This is happening now. Click to listen 13-15 June 2017 | WASHINGTON, DC Capitol Hill Ocean Week Live Streaming

https://www.marinesanctuary.org/oceanslive/

 

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 50′ Steel Stern Dragger, CAT C-18, Northern Lights 20 KW, Permits Available

Specifications, information and 3 photos click here To see all the boats in this series, Click here Vessel underwent approximately $ 100,000 in upgrades at the Derektor Shipyard in 2016 14:55

At U.N. Ocean Conference – Brett Tolley Touts Small-scale Fisheries

Fisheries activist Brett Tolley of Chatham has told many people about the plight of small-scale fishermen like his father, who left the industry because he couldn’t compete with big corporate interests. Last week, he told that story to world leaders in a special forum at the United Nations in New York.,, “We can’t buy our way out of this problem,” he said. The government rules that regulate commercial fishing tend to empower large corporations, and Tolley said that needs to change. Fisheries management that’s based on the allocation of shares (catch shares) or quotas of a particular catch tend to privatize the oceans, rather than treating them as shared public resources, he argued. Those policies tend to concentrate access to fisheries to a few big players. click here to read the story 13:47