Category Archives: New England

Delay Implementation of Gear Marking & Modification in Right Whale Rule

In a letter today to Secretary of Commerce Gina Raimondo, Governor Janet Mills urged swift action by NOAA Fisheries to reduce the unnecessary economic harm to Maine fishermen that the recently announced Federal whale protection rule will cause. “I don’t believe this rule, as written, should take effect at all, and, at the very least, I urge you to direct NOAA Fisheries to delay the rule’s implementation of gear marking and gear modifications (including both trawling up and insertion of weak points) to July 1, 2022,” wrote Governor Mills. “It is entirely unfair that Maine lobstermen continue to be the primary target of burdensome regulations, despite the many effective mitigation measures they have taken and despite the data showing that ship strikes and Canadian fishing gear continue to pose significant risk to right whales,” >click to read< 14:38

New Jersey fishing industry wonders if it can coexist with Biden’s planned massive wind farms

Clammers like Charlie Quintana are back from two days at sea on the Christy. Quintana worries about climate change: He says he’s noticed a change in the fisheries because of warming oceans. But he also worries that the hundreds of thousands of acres of wind farms planned for the East Coast will limit where he can catch clams,,, Surf clams were the first seafood to be regulated by the federal government, leading the way for what has become one of the most regulated industries in the nation. Where, when, how and how much are harvested is strictly monitored and enforced.,, “We are literally fighting for the existence of the clam industry to remain in the port of Atlantic City.” >click to read< 10:36

Wicked Tuna’s Tyler McLaughlin

National Geographic’s show “Wicked Tuna” has captivated and entertained audiences who not only revel in some good ol’ reality television but are also interested in what life at sea really entails. The show has had a successful run (10 seasons) and people just can’t get enough of these New England tuna fishermen who risk their lives for a promising salary and prestige. One of the show’s favorite OG fisherman is tuna fishing expert and New Hampshire native Tyler McLaughlin. McLaughlin has been on the show since day one ,,, >click to read< 07:50

NTSB to Host Roundtable on Fishing Vessel Safety

National Transportation Safety Board Chair Jennifer Homendy is set to host a virtual roundtable next month on improving fishing vessel safety. The commercial fishing industry remains largely uninspected and is a marine sector of concern.,, The roundtable will feature government officials, industry leaders, fishing vessel operators, safety experts and survivors of fishing vessel accidents to discuss what can be done to address commercial fishing safety concerns, implement NTSB safety recommendations and improve the safety of fishing operations in the U.S. >click to read< – The roundtable is set to take place October 14, 2021. More details can be found here. 13:27

Maiden Voyage

Stateside, Scania is known for its solid footing in commercial marine industry, Bristol Bay, Alaska’s salmon fisheries and Maine’s lobster boats are longtime proponents of the Swedish manufacturer. Scania engines are also used in trawlers, which often utilize commercial engines rated by the International Organization for Standardization as ICFN, or for continuous use. And now, with the Covid-19 pandemic having limited Scania’s bread-and-butter, North American commercial markets, the engine maker has invested in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency certification needed to enter the American recreational marine space. >click to read< 10:04

Wife, Mother, Grandmother, Stern Man Susan Amelia Clark of Kennebunkport has passed away

Susan Amelia (Collins) Clark, 81, passed away at home on Sept. 17, 2021, after a long, brave, and often miraculous battle with multiple health issues. She met Edward Russell Clark, Jr. (“Russ”) at a party, and they eloped on Dec. 29, 1967. Susan worked in a wide variety of roles over the years, from administration to accounting to sales. But her fondest (and most surprising) career accomplishment was obtaining her lobstering license and accompanying her husband Russ as his stern man, banding lobsters and baiting traps as they fished out of Cape Porpoise Harbor from the boat he’d named for her. She loved being a mother, and welcomed and celebrated her grandchildren, >click to read< 10:04

Offshore windfarms – some of the important actors

While I might have missed some of it, I haven’t seen much discussion of “who’s on first” vis-à-vis offshore windfarm development. Considering this, and considering that their development and the development of other controversial (at least to “historical” users of our nearshore and offshore waters) has the potential to severely impact or perhaps destroy, destroy the domestic commercial fishing industry starting in the mid-Atlantic/New England, I thought it might be instructive to examine some of the corporations who are interested in/committed to this INDUSTRIALIZATION of the ocean areas waters that have fed so many of our citizens and provided onshore and offshore employment for fishing communities since pre-revolutionary times. By Nils Stolpe /FishNet USA  >click to read< 19:15

Walter “Skip” Sheppard III of Ipswich, Ma. Owner of “Three Lantern Marine and Fishing” Company

Walter “Skip” Sheppard III, 68, of Ipswich, MA, passed away peacefully on Tuesday, September 14, 2021, with his loving family by his side after a long illness.  Skip’s greatest passion was being on the ocean, deep sea fishing and owning his own boat which led him to purchase and open “Three Lantern Marine and Fishing” in Gloucester, MA. This is where Skip found his true calling. In 2017, his son Matt joined the team at Three Lantern where he will now take over and continue his father’s legacy. Skip was very talented and loved to tinker on things. He enjoyed a good game of scrabble or golf and he was an amazing cook. One of Skip’s greatest achievements in life was his sobriety which he maintained for over 30 years and until his death. >click to read< 11:22

Maine: Next Generation Of Lobstermen Brace For Unprecedented Change

On a boat near Kennebunkport in late July, lobsterman Chris Welch demonstrated new ropeless gear made by a Massachusetts company. It costs about $4,000 per trap, several times more than a traditional lobster trap, which is usually $80-180. “So far it is retrievable,” Welch says. “But the challenge of the Maine fishery is there’s 5,000 lobstermen and we all fish amongst each other and attempt not to fish on top of each other. With these units unless you’re staring at your electronics all day or your iPad, there’s no way of knowing where the next guy is.”  The 33-year-old is against going ropeless and thinks the gear is a long way from being practical or affordable for most lobstermen. “I foresee it becoming a big boat fishery,” >click to read<  10:55

DMR briefs legislature on impact of NOAA’s new lobstering rules, options for appeal

On September 14, the Maine Legislature’s Committee on Marine Resources met and discussed the impact new rules recently released by the NOAA will have on Maine’s lobster industry, as well as the state’s legal options for appealing the rules.,, The new rules not only close nearly 1,000 square miles to lobstering between October and January, a time of year when lobster prices are at their highest, but changes the kind of gear lobstermen can use. Also discussed were threats to the right whale posed by Canada. As Keliher pointed out, the NMFS’ biological opinion noted that even if Maine is 100% successful in taking steps to protect right whales, whales will continue to go extinct if they continue to be hurt in Canada. Keliher also stated that he has had conversations with the head of> NOAA, Richard W. Spinrad, Ph.D < who hasn’t yet had a meeting with the Canadian government, but has agreed to raise the issue of including state representatives in Canadian affairs. Keliher also said NOAA’s head considers these conversations to be a government-to-government issue. He stated he disagrees and continues to press the issue. >click to read< 15:51

Published Today: New Regulations for Northeast Lobster and Jonah Crab Trap/Pot Fishery

Changes to Seasonal Restricted Areas Begin October 18, 2021; All Other Changes Effective May 1, 2022. The final rule to Amend the Atlantic Large Whale Take Reduction Plan to Reduce Risk of Serious Injury and Mortality to North Atlantic Right Whales Caused by Entanglement in Northeast Crab and Lobster Trap/Pot Fisheries announced on August 31 published in the Federal Register this morning. Some measures within the rule go into effect 30 days after today’s publication. The changes to seasonal restricted areas to allow fishing without persistent buoy lines will go into effect on October 18, 2021. In addition, there are changes to restricted areas below: >click to read<14:35

Rhode Island Fishermen Eligible to Apply For $255 Million in Coronavirus Relief Funds

The Rhode Island Congressional Delegation and the Department of Environmental Management (DEM) today announce that commercial fishing and charter/for hire businesses, qualified aquaculture operators, seafood processors, and dealers are eligible to apply for an additional $255 million in assistance funding provided by the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2021. The funding will support activities previously authorized under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. >click to read< 21:37

William D. Stinson, Sr., of Owls Head, Maine has passed away

William D. “Bill” Stinson, Sr., 78, died peacefully at home with his beloved wife and daughter by his side. Born in Stonington, August 8, 1943, he was the son of Norman and Gladys Smith Stinson. Bill lived his whole life in Owls Head, Following graduation, Bill enlisted in the U.S. Navy, serving aboard the USS Providence. Returning home, Bill married the love of his life, Mary Myrick in 1972. Throughout his life, Bill worked tirelessly to provide for his family so that his wife could stay at home and raise their two beautiful children. He had a love of the ocean, and worked for many years, fishing for FJ O’Hara’s aboard the vessel captained by his father Norman Stinson. When not out on the water, he worked for a lobster buying business, a bait business and as a night watchman. >click to read< 20:51

Stephen P. Ryan, 63, Commercial Fisherman, Photographer, and Craftsman

Stephen Paul Ryan died on Sept. 9, 2021 at his home in North Truro. He was 63. His death, of natural causes, was confirmed by his sister Nancy. The son of the late John J. and Isabel (Shea) Ryan, Stephen was born the eighth of nine siblings in Milford and raised in Medway. He began work as a commercial fisherman, serving as mate on several boats, including the F/V Susan Lynn, and F/V Rolex. He worked on one of the tuna boats featured in the television series Wicked Tunaand he tried his hand as a lobsterman. He was a longtime mate on the F/V Sea Wolf, Capt. Tommy Smith’s strike-net boat of bluefish fame. “He loved nature,” explained Capt. Smith, “and during slack time he would photograph the sunrise.” He would also carve quahogs into the shape of whales’ tails, Smith added. He made “really nice stuff.” >click to read< 11:43

Why Offshore Wind Farms Face Lawsuits – The American Coalition for Ocean Protection

Nantucket residents have filed a landmark lawsuit over federal approval of Vineyard Wind, the first industrial scale offshore wind project in the U.S. Federal law protects existing ocean uses: commercial fishing, vessel traffic, the viewshed, and endangered species from new energy projects. Since federal approvals of all offshore wind projects will likely use the same flawed process, a court win for this lawsuit may stop all the projects. Specifically, Ackrats is the group filing the complaint and is concerned about Vineyard Wind’s negative impact on the North Atlantic right whale, “one of the most critically endangered species on the entire planet.” Those Nantucket residents are not alone. Beach communities from North Carolina to Maine and the Great Lakes joined together to form the American Coalition for Ocean Protection. >click to read< 16:13

F/V Clo-Anne hauls up a rare orange lobster off Nauset

Paul Davis has been a commercial lobsterman for 12 years, and the orange lobster he pulled out of a trap just east of Nauset Beach Sept. 7 was the first time he’d seen one of that color. “I’ve never seen anyone else catch one,” he added. Davis, an Orleans resident who fishes on the F/V Clo-Anne that he launches from Town Cove, was pulling his traps off Nauset Beach last Tuesday. “We weren’t having the best day in the world, when all of a sudden my steering stern man said, ‘Look, we’ve got an orange lobster!’” Daniel Hohner held up the creature, and sure enough, it was bright orange, almost pumpkin colored, rather than the typical dark greenish blue or brown. >click to read< 07:57

Lobsterman Paul T. Farrin of South Bristol has passed away

Paul T. Farrin, 85, of South Bristol, died peacefully at home on his birthday, Sept. 5, 2021, surrounded by his loving family. Born on Sept. 5, 1936, in Damariscotta, he was the son of Afton and Annie May Farrin. At the age of 15, he began his long career as a lobsterman off the coast of South Bristol, retiring in 1986. During that time, he caught a lot of his own bait and built his own wooden traps each winter. He spent 13 years seining/trapping mackerel and herring with his brothers. He went shrimping with his brother David many winters, fished for crabs in the Damariscotta River, and rarely missed a season dragging for scallops. He was also one of the founding members of the South Bristol Fisherman’s Co-op, serving as the first president in 1972. Paul had a wonderful and active life. He loved the outdoors and spent more time outside, than inside. >click to read<  22:31

Fishing group’s lawsuit challenges fed review of offshore wind project

A second group has filed a federal lawsuit challenging the government’s approval of the offshore wind project that is expected to generate cleaner electricity for more than 400,000 homes and businesses in Massachusetts starting in late 2023. A coalition of fishing industry groups called the Responsible Offshore Development Alliance petitioned the U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit on Monday to review the Department of the Interior and Bureau of Ocean Energy Management’s approval of the Vineyard Wind I project, arguing that the green light “adds unacceptable risk” to the fishing industry without addressing its long-held concerns. >click to read< 12:18

Opposition Forms from N.C. to N.E. to Great Lakes over ocean industrial development all-in consumer cost

A loose coalition of offshore wind opponents is forming from North Carolina to New England to the Great Lakes to question or challenge the expanding list of proposed projects. The Thomas Jefferson Institute for Public Policy has affiliated with the coalition, with our concerns over Dominion Energy Virginia’s proposed 5,280 megawatt project basically being economic. Massive worldwide economic forces are behind this push, most of them positioning the company to earn substantial profits from energy ratepayers. The Virginia State Corporation Commission, basically under orders from the General Assembly to approve the offshore wind proposed by Dominion, has estimated the all-in consumer cost of the Dominion project at more than $37 billion. It accounts for about a third of the $807 annual increase in residential electric bills the SCC has projected by 2030, with the power provided dependent on unreliable wind. >click to read< 11:55

9/11 Boat Evacuation: Greater Than Dunkirk

Romans 8:28 says “all things work together for good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His purpose.” Twenty years after the 9/11 terror attacks that murdered nearly three thousand people we are beginning to see ‘the good’ that God brought on that day. That someone like Christina Stanton, a regular New Yorker who ran for her life after the second plane came within 500 feet of her apartment balcony… would find a deeper, more real faith in Jesus Christ. That Peter Johansen, the director of Ferry Operations, would become God’s agents in helping to rescue a half million people through a massive boat evacuation and how the two people who were strangers before 9/11, became friends. It was New York’s version of Dunkirk, the mass evacuation of people stranded in what became a war zone on 9-11. audio report,  >click to read< 08:21

151 Maine legislators call on Biden to rescind new lobster fishing reg’s, while the real threat remains

State legislators have submitted a letter to President Joe Biden requesting (DEMAND!) that his administration take steps to immediately rescind new regulations on lobster fishing. The new regulations, which are intended to protect the endangered North Atlantic right whale,,, Rep. Billy Bob Faulkingham, R-Winter Harbor, a lobster fisherman, initiated the letter. Maine Senate President Troy Jackson also criticized the new reg’s,, “The new federal regulations are an affront to the men and women who have made a living on Maine’s working waterfront for generations,,, I’m deeply disappointed that NOAA has decided to dismiss the voices of Maine’s lobstering workforce and chosen to go ahead with damaging regulations that do nothing more than hurt our fishermen, while the real threat to right whales remains, Canadian ships.” Video, >click to read< 16:03

Rep. Sherm Hutchins – Maine’s lobster industry is under siege

Maine’s lobstermen and women are under attack by the Biden Administration after a recent set of rule changes restricting seasonal lobster fishing in 950 square miles of federal waters off Maine’s coast. This is an inflexible and poorly considered attempt to protect the North Atlantic right whale population. The series of rule changes are the most heavy-handed in a long line of attempts to undermine the lobster industry here in Maine. If our fisheries are not protected, and if these rules are not reversed, Maine’s fishermen and women will not recover. >click to read< 09:47

More siege from the non-productive slugs of the enviroscam movement – Zack Klyver, science director with the group Blue Planet Strategies, has a different view on the issue. I’m sympathetic to them and know that they work extremely hard,,, >click to read< 11:25

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 64′ Steel Scallop/Dragger, 350HP Cummins

To review specifications, information, and 12 photo’s >click here< , To see all the boats in this series >click here<  11:14

About that “seat at the table”,,, New England Aqua Ventus Monhegan project a concern for fishermen

Boothbay region fishermen and community members are expressing concern over the New England Aqua Ventus project, a floating offshore wind turbine to be built two miles south of Monhegan. NEAV is a partnership between Maine Prime Technologies – a business arm of the University of Maine – and wind industry giants Diamond Offshore Wind, a subsidiary of Mitsubishi, and RWE Renewables.,,, “Now I sit on this panel and I’m being asked ‘How can we do this better’ even though I’m being told it’s still going to happen … Boothbay lobsterman Eben Wilson, “People have been telling me it’s such a great opportunity to have a seat at the table, and I’m like, a seat at the table? For what? To tell them how to cut my throat better? Or how to cut it slower?” >click to read< 09:02

Massachusetts man rescues woman from burning Rowley home

A Massachusetts man who lost his wife and two young children in a fire 20 years ago is being hailed as a hero after rescuing a neighbor from her burning home in Rowley. Commercial fisherman Mark Collum says he heard a woman screaming for help at about 5 a.m. Sunday. He ran outside and noticed his neighbor’s house on Wethersfield Street was on fire, which prompted him to call 911. He then ran into the home and was able to get his neighbor, Deb Shanahan, out of the fire. Shanahan was hurt, but her injuries are not believed to be serious. In January 2001, Collum’s wife, Lisa, and their two daughters, 4-year-old Lindsay and 5-month-old Carly, died after a fire ripped through their Ipswich home.  >Video, click to read< 17:50

American Aquafarms salmon farm anxious to explain its vision. pssst, Eirik. No one wants it.

Officials representing a controversial salmon farm proposed for Frenchman Bay hope to meet with the public in the coming weeks to explain their vision amid vocal and visible opposition. Ten days ago, a flotilla of boats showed their opposition to the project in the water surrounding Acadia National Park. Company vice president Eirik Jors said American Aquafarms wants to open a U.S. location to help meet the growing demand for salmon. “The U.S. imports about 90% of its seafood,”,,, Save it, Eirik. National Park Service blasted the proposal in July., Other groups, including Protect Maine’s Fishing Heritage and Frenchman Bay United, are worried about the loss of fishing grounds for lobstermen and others. James West, a fourth-generation fisherman from Sorrento, said the lease site is too big and he’s worried about impacts on lobsters and fish. >click to read< 15:39

American Seafood Corp. Fights Giant Jones Act Penalties

U.S. Customs and Border Protection has stirred up a storm in the Alaska pollock fishery by issuing Jones Act penalty notices totaling about S350 million. According to a lawsuit filed by an affiliate of factory trawler giant American Seafoods Corporation, the fines could raise the price of pollock and even lead to shortages in the eastern U.S., the region affected by the enforcement action. Through the operations of its Alaska Reefer Management affiliate, American Seafoods routinely delivers Alaskan fish to customers on the U.S. Eastern Seaboard using chartered foreign-flag vessels. These ships are loaded in Dutch Harbor, then transit through the Panama Canal and around the East Coast to the port of Bayside, Canada. At Bayside, the cargo is offloaded into truck trailers for delivery to the Eastern United States.  >click to read< 09:18

Decaying Anna anchors a boatload of visions in Cape Vincent

“It was quite an adventure,” he said, recalling the trip Anna took to Cape Vincent. “The hull was always leaky. There were constant bilge pumps going and checking on the boat. It got here. It was a hell of a trip for an old girl like that. In many ways, I’m surprised it wasn’t more of an arduous or unsuccessful trip. But there she is.” He’s witnessed the growth of her legend and has seen visitors stop by for photos with her. “To be honest with you, I’m shocked at how this whole thing has gotten so popular and so many people are talking about it and are interested,” he said. photos,  >click to read< 08:45

Life Long Scalloper Daniel Jean Joseph Lareau has passed away

New Bedford – Daniel Jean Joseph Lareau, 64, went to meet our Lord on Monday, August 30, 2021. Daniel’s love of the sea was only surpassed by the love for his children, Danielle and Eric Lareau. A life long scalloper, he spent his final years with his grandson Ocean James, who was the light of his life. Daniel was know for his massive heart, he was the type of man who would give the shirt off his back, a man who bought the entire neighborhood ice cream, pack the car full of his nieces and nephews on a hot summer day and go on adventures. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Saturday, September 11,,, To leave a note of condolence, and details, >click to read< 20:32

$350M Bering Sea fish fight could hinge on a miniature Canadian railroad

The quickly escalating saga involves hundreds of millions of dollars in fines, and a miniature Canadian railway,,, American Seafoods’ shipping subsidiary and an affiliate company, Kloosterboer International Forwarding, sued U.S. Customs and Border Protection in federal court Thursday,,, The Jones Act, a century-old federal law, typically requires American-flagged ships to move cargo between American ports. But the legislation contains an exception known as the “Third Proviso,” ,,Vessels flagged in countries like Singapore and the Bahamas first pick up frozen seafood products in Dutch Harbor, then travel to the Canadian port of Bayside, New Brunswick, just across the border from Maine. From Bayside, the seafood would be trucked to a Canadian train, loaded and moved 20 miles between two stations,,, >click to read< 14:10