Category Archives: South Atlantic

Man rescued after being spotted clinging to the bow of his sunken boat 86 miles east of Port Canaveral

The Coast Guard is monitoring the safe return home of Stuart Bee, a 63-year-old man, who departed Cape Marina, Port Canaveral, Friday, and was rescued Sunday, by the 225-meter motor vessel Angeles crew about 86 miles off the coast. The Angeles’ next port of call is Wilmington, Delaware. Bee is in contact with his brother who will assist in bringing him home once in Delaware. Receiving the alert, the Angeles’ crew lookout spotted Bee clinging to the bow of his boat at approximately 10 a.m. and brought him aboard, 5 photos, >click to read< 19:23

Florida: One month into stone crab season, and there’s good news from the docks and markets

Fishermen are reporting a strong supply while markets and restaurants are saying customer demand is just as promising. “It’s been an outstanding season so far,” said Kelly Kirk, owner of Kirk Fish Company.  For customers, that means good news: Prices have held steady compared to last year. And large claws, usually more elusive, have been especially abundant, Kirk said.  The strong landings come despite new restrictions imposed by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission aimed at protecting the stone crab population after years of declining harvests. Kirk said those declines aren’t being seen this season. “We’re seeing the opposite of that, actually,” Kirk said. “Had COVID not hit and the whole market turned upside down (last year), we probably would have broken records as far as production. >click to read< 10:34

Coast Guard concluded search for missing man near St. Helena Sound

The Coast Guard concluded the search Thursday evening for a man who went missing after his fishing vessel capsized, Wednesday. The man has been identified as Don Melcoock, 50, who is from the greater Charleston area. “I am thankful of the aggressive search efforts put forth by all of our Coast Guard units and partner agencies who have conducted search and rescue operations over the past three days,” said Lt. Cmdr. Christie Connell, the search and rescue mission coordinator at Sector Charleston. “We found the second missing man who unfortunately did not survive. Our thoughts and prayers go out to the family of the deceased.” >click to read< 20:37

UPDATED: 1 man found alive, 1 still missing after shrimp boat capsizes in Beaufort County

The found man’s condition is stable and he’s continuing to improve after he was found late this morning off Tybee Island. According to the Coast Guard, one of the men has been found alive in a life raft. He has been airlifted to Memorial Hospital in Savannah. There is no word yet on his condition. Officials say a Good Samaritan spotted the man and called the Coast Guard. The search continues for the other missing boater. >click to read< 06:51

Coast Guard crews work to remove 33,000 gallons fuel from fishing vessel aground east of Egg Island, GA

The Coast Guard is working to remove diesel fuel from an aground fishing vessel east of Egg Island. The fishing vessel initially ran aground on November 4 after it became disabled.  The Coast Guard is working with partner agencies and a hired contractor to remove a potential amount of 33,000 gallons of diesel fuel from the fishing vessel. The Coast Guard is actively working with salvage contractors and the vessel’s owner to find the best means possible for this unique situation being that it’s a difficult project due to the grounding location.”  >click to read< 17:43

Two missing after shrimp boat capsizes in Beaufort County, South Carolina

The U.S. Coast Guard and multiple other agencies are searching for two adult males who disappeared after a shrimp boat capsized Tuesday. Responders found the capsized shrimp boat in St. Helena Sound near Harbor Island where the pair had been fishing. Multiple agencies have boats, cutters and helicopters searching for the fishermen. >click to read< 07:14

Coast Guard, partner agencies searching for 2 men near St. Helena Sound – Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Charleston received notification at 3:47 p.m., Tuesday from a family member stating the two men were overdue. A Coast Guard Air Station Savannah helicopter aircrew deployed a rescue swimmer to the 27-foot capsized vessel with no signs of the two men.  >click to read<

From the sea floor to the courtroom, the fight to save right whales

The North Atlantic right whale is one of the most endangered species on the planet. Scientists announced last month that there are only about 360 of the animals left, down roughly 50 from the previous year’s survey. They live along the East Coast, from northern Florida to Canada, where the 50-foot-long, 140,000-pound leviathans must navigate through millions of commercial fishing lines primarily, lobster traps, and one of the world’s most crowded shipping channels. Too often they become tangled in those lines, or are struck by a ship, (Ships, A LOT of ships). The fight to save them, led by biologists and conservation groups, has grown urgent — in the water and in the courts. >click to read< 11:28

Three New Calves! North Atlantic Right Whale calving season is now underway

Right whales are an endangered species that usually migrate south along the Georgia and Florida coastline to give birth to their calves. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission announced over the weekend that calving season is now underway and lasts through March. In the 2020 calving season, there were 10 calves born, which was up from seven in the 2019 season. Despite the increase in calves, the species is still endangered. In the 2020 calving season, there were 10 calves born, which was up from seven in the 2019 season.>click to read< 15:27

One lawsuit dismissed, another filed against State of North Carolina over fisheries management

The latest suit was filed on Tuesday in state court, the same day another group’s legal action against government officials’ management of marine fisheries in North Carolina was dismissed in federal court. The Coastal Conservation Association of North Carolina, along with 86 North Carolinians, filed their civil action Tuesday against the state in Wake County Superior Court. In an unrelated case, an organization called the North Carolina Coastal Fisheries Reform Group filed a federal lawsuit in August saying regulations that allow large, ocean-going shrimp trawlers to work in the state’s sounds violated the Clean Water Act. >click to read< 08:01

McClellanville receives $25K grant to help preserve its working waterfront

McClellanville is one of 12 towns recently awarded the Hometown Economic Development Grant from the Municipal Association of South Carolina. The $25,000 grant will go towards an economic development plan to keep and preserve it’s working waterfront, the main economic and cultural aspect of the town.,, “It’ll help the whole town out, this is a shrimping and fishing village, so that working waterfront, probably about half of that town relies on that working waterfront,” >Video, click to read< 09:49

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 54′ Fiberglass Shrimp Dragger, 2 John Deere 6081’s, Kubota – 21 KW genset

To review specifications, and information, and 3 photos >click here<, To see all the boats in this series, >click here<12:10

U.S. Coast Guard rescues seven in two missions off the Georgia coast – Video

The Coast Guard rescued seven people in two separate search and rescue cases Tuesday off the Georgia coast.  In the first rescue, three people were hoisted from a life raft about 60 miles east of Tybee Island,,, In the second rescue, a separate Air Station Savannah Dolphin aircrew hoisted four survivors at 5:18 a.m. after the fishing vessel, Jimmy & Charlie, began taking on water near Egg Island.  >Video, click to read< 15:13

Police Blotter: Colorado Man Steals Shrimpin’ Boat from Murrells Inlet Marina

Deputies from Georgetown County Sheriff’s Office arrested a suspect Wednesday night, Nov. 4, 2020, in the theft of a shrimp boat from a marina in Murrells Inlet. Daniel Connor Janowski, 28, of Golden, Col., was also charged with possession of a stolen vehicle that was recovered from the parking lot at Marlin Quay Marina. Janowski is accused of taking the F/V Lila Lee,,, >click to read< 10:54

Shem Creek: Keeping the Lowcountry shrimping industry afloat

The Carolina Breeze leaves the dock every day at 6:00 a.m., with Captain Donnie Brown and his crew Joe, Ziggy, and Emily in tow. Taylor Tarvin — owner of Tarvin’s Seafood on Shem Creek and two boats, including the Carolina Breeze — says that while the business is easy to get into, it is not easy to stay in. He says that while he gets a lot of satisfaction out of supplying “a wholesome, healthy product for people to consume,” the business has become tough. Just 30 years ago, there were over 70 shrimp boats in Shem Creek. Now, there are only about 13. >video, click to read< 09:33

How a stolen shrimp boat ended up on an SC sandbar

Charlie Werner left his shrimp boat alone for maybe 15 hours on Halloween weekend, but it was enough time for the vessel to go missing, stolen in the dead of night. Werner discovered his boat, the Lila Lee, missing from the Marlin Quay Marina midday on Oct. 31, and camera footage later showed a man hop from another boat into this before taking off around 12 a.m. earlier that day. He reported the 40-foot boat missing to police that day. He worried he might never see it again. >click to read< They’ll need a little help, and a GoFundMe page is stablished, >click to donate, if you can< 07:31

The Magwood family is grateful for love, and support

The Magwood family would like to sincerely thank the town of Mount Pleasant, the surrounding Charleston community and the many friends for the beautiful outpouring of support that was bestowed upon us after the sudden passing of our father, Capt. Wayne Magwood. Our hearts were touched and we were truly comforted by everyone who showed their love for our father. The acts of kindness, loving words, prayers and tributes shared to honor his memory fille

A Day in the Life of a North Carolina Fisherman

65-year-old Bob McBride greets two helpers before the three steps aboard John 3:16, his 25-foot fiberglass fishing boat. For the next 45 minutes, the fishermen motor east across the Pamlico Sound until they reach an outcropping of wooden stakes rising from the water. The stakes support a series of nets, and McBride navigates his boat into the center. McBride is a pound netter, one of the world’s oldest forms of fishing. Long before Europeans came to the mainland, Native American tribes submerged logs into the Chesapeake Bay to capture Spanish mackerel in their netted maze. For the past 40 years, McBride has followed that same method, as twice a year he sets out a series of nets that form a sort of live aquarium in the Pamlico Sound. >click to read< 13:59

North Carolina Fisheries Association Weekly Update for October 30, 2020

Legislative updates, Bill updates, Calendar, >Click here to read the Weekly Update<, to read all the updates >click here<, for older updates listed as NCFA >click here<21:46

Canada, U.S. researchers gathering virtually to report on right whales

Researchers from Canada and the U.S. are gathering virtually this week for an annual conference that focuses on an endangered whale species. The North Atlantic Right Whale Consortium, which brings together academic researchers, government agencies, shipping and fishing industries and conservation organizations, is expected to release part of a yearly report card on how the whales are faring. ,, So far this year, one right whale has been found dead in U.S. with wounds that suggested a vessel strike. There have been no reported deaths in Canadian waters so far in 2020. >click to read< 09:40

Ronnie Max Andrews, 52, enjoyed a career as a commercial fisherman, has passed away

Ronnie was the son of Eyela Merrill Stouffer of Pensacola, Florida, and the late Ronald Clinton Andrews. Ronnie spent his adult life on the water as a commercial fisherman along the East Coast and spent much of that time in the Brunswick County area. He was a great fisherman and shrimper and will be missed by all who called him a friend. At the time of his death, Ronnie was a valued friend and crewman aboard the Capt. C.L. Holden out of Shallotte Point. >click to read< 17:44

North Carolina Fisheries Association Weekly Update for October 23, 2020

Legislative updates, Bill updates, Calendar, >Click here to read the Weekly Update<, to read all the updates >click here<, for older updates listed as NCFA >click here< 14:29 – My view: I have not read the 300+ page bill yet, but others involved in commercial fishing have. In short, this would be a nightmare for the domestic commercial fishing industry. Elections have consequences! God bless, Jerry

Podcast: FV-Tuna.com Capt. Dave Carraro previews Wicked Tuna Outer Banks season finale

Capt. Dave Carraro has been a mainstay and a fan favorite on National Geographic’s hit series, Wicked Tuna, which chronicles the lives of commercial bluefin tuna fishermen in America’s oldest seaport – Gloucester, Massachusettes. He is the legendary captain of the FV-Tuna.com, and has an unprecedented five wins on Wicked Tuna. Carraro’s repeated success and highly competitive nature sometimes put him at odds with the rest of the fleet, but he is notoriously more interested in catching fish than making friends. Listen to the podcast! >click to read< 10:03

The CARES Act: Lengthy Process, Little to Show for Connecticut Fisheries

Nearly seven months after the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act was signed into law, eligible fisheries and related businesses can apply for $1.8 million in economic aid through the CARES Assistance to Fishery Participants (CAAFP) program. Connecticut is part of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC), which also includes Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. From the $300 million, 31 entities received funding. Connecticut’s allocation was $1.8 million, the 9th lowest on the list. Rhode Island received $3.3 million,,, >click to read< 09:58

Fisherman charged in 2018 scallop boat slaying ruled mentally incompetent

A Newport News man charged with killing a fellow fisherman two years ago on a scallop boat off the coast of Massachusetts has been declared mentally incompetent to stand trial. Franklin Meave faces life in prison on a federal charge of killing Javier Rangel Sosa, 54, a well-liked fisherman,, On Sept. 18, 2018, the Captain Billy Haver, an 83-foot fishing boat, left its York County dock with a crew of seven to dredge scallops off the Massachusetts coast. Sosa was the boat’s chief mate; Meave was a hired hand. Five days later,,, “Mayday, mayday, mayday,” the boat’s captain said,, “We have a man gone crazy here on the boat, man,” he said when the Coast Guard responded. “One man, I don’t know if he’s dead or what. But one of the crew members went crazy, and he started hitting people in the head with a hammer. >click to read< 14:50,  Six articles, starting in September 24, 2018, >click to read<

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 82′ Raised Foc’sle Steel Stern Trawler with Federal, State Permits

To review specifications, and information, >click here< To see all the boats in this series, >click here< 12:04

Collins and several colleagues call on NOAA to resume ‘usual operational tempo’

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) should get back to its regular schedule of conducting fisheries research surveys, which have been cancelled since May due to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to U.S. Sen. Susan Collins and several colleagues. Additionally, NOAA should identify and resolve any challenges created by the pandemic that prevented this year’s surveys to ensure surveys are safely conducted in 2021, the lawmakers wrote in a Sept. 30 letter sent to Dr. Neil Jacobs, acting administrator at NOAA. Among the members who joined Sen. Collins in signing the letter were U.S. Sens. Richard Burr (R-NC), Roger Wicker (R-MS), and Doug Jones (D-AL). >click to read< 09:00

Stone crab season opens Oct. 15 with new regulations in place

For roughly a week now, armadas of Floridian crabbing fleets and their deckhands have boated miles offshore into the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean to lay their traps on the depths. Come Thursday, Oct. 15, 2020, these crabbers will venture out again to launch Florida’s stone crab season, hauling in anticipated bounties of Menippe mercenaria and their treasured claws. “We’re putting them out right now,” Richard Stiglitz, owner of the Homosassa-based Salty Bones Fisheries, said about 650 of his 10,000 traps. It’ll take some time before crabbing crews know what kind of season they’ll have. >click to read< 10:05

North Carolina Fisheries Association Weekly Update for October 09, 2020

Legislative updates, Bill updates, Calendar, >Click here to read the Weekly Update<, to read all the updates >click here<, for older updates listed as NCFA >click here< 22:56

Real Estate Rent Seekers Furious: Trump Sinks USA’s Offshore Wind Industry

Never a fan of the wind industry, Donald Trump has just destroyed its prospects all along America’s Atlantic coast. Trump’s ban on offshore drilling for oil and gas, has the altogether brilliant side-effect of preventing any more offshore wind turbines from cluttering up the coastlines of several states from Florida to North Carolina, with his sights set on Virginia, as well. Trump’s ban on oil and gas extraction offshore will have little effect on America’s oil and gas sector. America’s shale oil and gas revolution, which has turned the USA into a net oil and gas exporter, is an exclusively onshore affair. But, as to be expected, the effect on its wind industry has sent rent seekers into apoplexy. >click to read< 10:37

Commercial Fisherman, Farmer, Joseph Michael Kelly has passed away

Mr. Joseph Kelly, 59, of Parksley, passed away on Tuesday, September 29th. Mr. Kelly was born to Thomas and Teresa Kelly on Long Island, and he grew up in Orient, New York, graduating from Greenport High School in 1978.  He attended college in Farmville, VA and after a brief period in Long Island, he moved to Parksley, VA, and spent his career working both as a commercial fisherman and a farmer.  He was particularly proud of his fishing boat “Toots”, which he used for both for fishing and long-line lobstering in the waters off the east coast of Virginia. Mr. Kelly was a dedicated husband, father, and grandfather. >click to read< 07:58