Brad Gentner: It’s time to rethink ‘catch shares’

Catch shares in marine fisheries is a concept unfamiliar to most people, and it is probably completely alien to most hunters and anglers in this country. It is a system of wildlife management that bestows some percentage of a public marine resource, like red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico, to private businesses for free, to use and sell for their own profit. It was thought that by giving away ownership rights to individuals, the fishery would consolidate and ultimately become easier to manage. While the same number of fish would be caught, the benefits of funneling access to the resource through fewer entities was thought to remove some of the uncertainty in the industry and thus would be worth the price of privatizing a public resource for free. While catch shares are still the darling of some fisheries economists, there is a growing backlash against this management tool worldwide for a variety of reasons. At the heart of these complaints is fleet and wealth consolidation, extraction of public wealth for private profit, and failure to capitalize share-cost into production costs. click here to read the op-ed 21:46

Scania powers up its marine engine range

Scania is launching a new six-cylinder 13-liter inline marine engine. The new engine, which combines new power levels ranging from 650 to 925 hp with reduced fuel consumption, consolidates Scania’s position as a leader in power-to-weight ratio. The engine is the second platform in Scania’s marine engine portfolio to use common rail XPI fuel injection technology to reach higher power levels and lower fuel consumption. XPI technology was first introduced in Scania’s marine engine range in 2015 when the 1,150 hp V8 engine was launched. However, the system has been used in its engines for trucks and industrial applications since 2007; As well as lowering fuel consumption and noise levels, the common-rail XPI fuel injection system also gives a faster engine response and a quicker torque build-up. The first appearance of the new, and powerful 13-liter engine will be on display at the Lobster Boat Races in Stonington, ME on July 9, 2017. click here to read the story 17:36

Mooloolaba tuna skipper and crew survive frightening freak wave at sea

Skipper Myles McIntosh and his crew have survived a frightening encounter at sea after a freak wave shattered four windows on their tuna long liner, sending water coursing through the Santa Lucia’s cabin. It took two days to travel the 483 kilometres back from Lord Howe Island to their home port of Mooloolaba, for repairs to the gaping holes that exposed the wheelhouse to the elements early this week. “We were just operating, winching up as normal, when a little freak wave built in front of us and hit us the wrong way,” Mr McIntosh said. “It was a bit hairy, smashed a few windows.  The Santa Lucia is one of five long liners in the Walker Seafoods Australia fleet owned by Heidi and Pavo Walker. Mr Walker said the tuna industry was dangerous to invest in, with more challenges than freak waves at sea. click here to read the story 16:24

Baby lobster abundance suggests strong harvests will continue

Lobster fishermen and government officials are seeing indications are that lobster stocks will be plentiful in the Gulf of St. Lawrence for the next few years at least. Fishermen have been reporting a lot of smaller lobsters in their traps this year, which Fisheries and Oceans Canada preliminary monitoring has confirmed. Amelie Rondeau of Fisheries and Oceans said the abundance of lobsters has been building in the last five years, with lobster landings going up as well. “All the stars are aligned: favourable environmental conditions, combined with proper management of the stocks,” said Rondeau. click here to read the story 14:01