Monthly Archives: November 2017

Search underway for crew of capsized tuna fishing boat off Palau

A search is underway for two Japanese and five Indonesian crew members after their fishing ship was found capsized about 400 kilometers (250 miles) from the Pacific island of Palau. Planes and ships from the U.S., Japan and Palau are taking part in the search for the Japanese-flagged Gyotoku Maru No. 1, the U.S. Coast Guard said Wednesday. The 15-meter (50-foot) tuna fishing boat capsized southwest of Palau. click here to read the story 11:21

‘Codfather’s’ fraud leaves New Bedford fishing permits on ice, and lot of people out of work

South Coast officials and seafood industry interests were stunned by Monday’s federal decision to shut down a sector with ties to disgraced fishing magnate Carlos Rafael, a decision they say will cut into the livelihoods of fishermen during the holiday season and beyond. “The ruling itself was unexpected,” said Andrew Saunders, a New Bedford attorney retained two months ago by Northeast Fishery Sector 9, one of 19 non-profit entities set up to manage fishing industry operations in the face of strict catch limits imposed by the federal government.,, New Bedford Mayor Jon Mitchell says there’s collateral damage involved for people in the New Bedford area whose jobs are tethered to the harvesting of groundfish such as cod, flounder and haddock. click here to read the story 10:48

This Hilton Head shrimp boat is a Lowcountry comeback story — and now a viral photo

She was surf fishing when she saw the boat, its nets trawling the water, its running lights bright in the ever-darkening sky, and its size made her pause, then hurry from the beach. Terri Chabot lives in Kure Beach, N.C., close to the pier the shrimp boat was nearing Saturday, and she gambled she’d be able to run home and back before the moment passed. The sun was setting and birds circled the boat, which, with its outriggers deployed, looked much like a pelican skimming the sea. It was under a half-mile offshore, Chabot estimated. She could not make out its name. click here to read the story 09:39

Optimism heading into the 2017 lobster season off southwestern Nova Scotia – Search and Rescue is Ready!

While many factors can come into play before an opening shore price is determined in the commercial lobster fishery, there is reason for optimism going into this season. In the Upper Bay of Fundy in Lobster Fishing Area (LFA) 35, where the season opened on Oct. 14, there are reports of strong landings and a solid shore price of $6.50. The Canadian dollar was trading at less than 80 cents with its American counterpart in October, which is always good news for Canadian exporters. click here to read the story 08:35

SAR assets lined up for lobster dumping day off southwestern Nova Scotia-Inshore and offshore Search and Rescue (SAR) platforms will already be on the fishing grounds and in position when lobster fishermen in LFAs 33 and 34 head out to set their traps on dumping day. click here to read the story

Good Samaritans rescue 4 from fishing boat fire off Pillar Point Harbor

Four crewmembers from the commercial fishing vessel Ocean Gale were rescued by the crew of the commercial fishing vessel Smith Brothers #2, after a boat fire 13 miles southwest of Pillar Point Harbor. Fishermen aboard the Ocean Gale, a 37-foot vessel, contacted Coast Guard Sector San Francisco watchstanders at approximately 5 p.m., Monday, reporting a fire aboard their boat.,, Crews aboard four commercial fishing vessels, Alma, Mr. Morgan, Alicia Dawn and Smith Brothers #2, responded to the UMIB and diverted to the scene.  click here to read press release 22:30

New NOAA Director seems willing to work with fishing industry

Jon Hare has just completed his first twelve months on the job as a science and research director or NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole. And its a big job. But he’s still smiling. The NEFSC managers the living marine resources of the Northeast Continental Shelf Ecosystem from the Gulf of Maine to Cap Hatteras. But Hare’s energy and enthusiasm have been equal to the task, while his willingness to listen and engage with all comers have earned him respect within NOAA and in the larger community.  It’s been a challenge but one that I’ve enjoyed,” he said, sitting don for a wide-ranging discussion at the Fishing Partnership office in New Bedford last week. click here to read the story 21:46

Friends of Adam Purington say he was polite, hard working

Friends of Adam Purington describe him as polite, quiet and hard-working, a veteran who was a respectful guest at Thanksgiving dinner. But he died alone, in a storage container at the Rockland Fish Pier, with six uncashed paychecks on him when he died. His death, apparently from carbon monoxide poisoning, has shaken those who knew the 37-year-old Purington. His boss of the last two years, Frank Thompson, of Vinalhaven, said Purington was incredibly nice and one of the hardest workers he has had. “He would always meet with you a handshake,” Thompson said. Other crew members who worked with Purington were too upset to talk Tuesday, Thompson said, as they unloaded lobsters from his lobster smack at the fish pier. click here to read the story 20:37

After working with four generations of Inshore Fisheries family, Yarmouth County woman getting set to retire

Through four generations and almost 50 years, Nancy d’Entremont has seen a lot of changes as bookkeeper for Inshore Fisheries Ltd. in West Pubnico, Yarmouth County. D’Entremont began her career with Inshore Fisheries in February 1969, working for Mercedes d’Entremont and her business partner Lester d’Entremont. “The office was in her house,” recalls d’Entremont. And the pay was good. “I started at $40 a week.” In those days, buying and selling lobsters was the main focus of the company. “It was very different than it is today,” click here to read the story 20:06

ICCAT Ups Canadian Share of Bluefin tuna quota

Fishermen in Atlantic Canada will be able to catch another 77 tonnes of Bluefin tuna next year after an international commission agreed to raise the annual quota following an improvement in stocks. The increase was approved Tuesday during a meeting in Marrakech, Morocco of the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT). Environmental group ‘disappointed’ Still, the increase was denounced by the Ecology Action Centre, click here to read the story 17:47

Trump Administration Dives Into Fish Fight

An unprecedented Trump administration decision over the summer that overruled an interstate fishing commission has drawn the ire of critics who worry that keeping a healthy and viable supply of flounder in the Atlantic Ocean is being sacrificed to commercial profits. While the fight over fish largely has been out of the public eye, it has implications for Maryland and other coastal states. In July, Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross overruled a recommendation by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission finding New Jersey out of compliance with proposed 2017 harvest limits of summer flounder along the Atlantic coast. click here to read the story 15:28

Mayors go to D.C. to lobby for Anacortes shipbuilder

The mayors of Anacortes and Mount Vernon traveled to Washington, D.C., last week to urge legislators to forgive a local shipbuilder’s mistake. In speaking to the state’s Congressional delegation, Anacortes Mayor Laurie Gere lobbied for a waiver that would allow a ship built in the city to be used in U.S. waters, thus protecting the jobs of those who work for the shipbuilder. America’s Finest, the vessel in question, was built by Dakota Creek Industries in Anacortes for the Kirkland-based company Fisherman’s Finest for use in the Bering Sea. click here to read the story 13:50

NOAA Bans Rafaels Vessels from Groundfishing

Calling its actions “unprecedented” NOAA announced Monday that Carlos Rafael’s vessels are banned from catching groundfish for the foreseeable future. The government agency also said the vessels currently at sea on a groundfish trip must return to port, where they will be allowed to unload and sell their catch. click here to read the story 13:11

Fishing fleet dominated by ‘Codfather’ grounded – Jailed New Bedford fishing mogul Carlos Rafael’s empire, once one of the largest fish businesses in the country, continues to crumble. click here to read the story 13:31

Nations decide to increase quota for Atlantic Bluefin tuna

Countries fishing the eastern Atlantic and the Mediterranean agreed Tuesday to expand the annual quota for prized Bluefin tuna to reflect an improvement in their stocks. Two officials at the meeting of the 50-nation International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas said that at the end of the meeting Tuesday, countries have agreed to hike the quota from 24,000 tons this year to 28,000 next year, with a further 4,000 added in each of the following two years. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity because the decision has not been officially announced yet. click here to read the story 12:26

Good morning, Eureka! Fifth Street is Covered in Fish Guts

Tuesday morning traffic on Fifth Street near its intersection with M Street is restricted to one lane after a truck spilled a load of fish waste there. Eureka Police Department officers are on scene directing vehicles while they wait for heavy equipment to come mop up all the gross.  “Consider an alternate route if traveling north this morning,” EPD recommends. photo’s, click here 11:06

Tuna troller sinks in Ilwaco mooring basin

Authorities on Monday continued dealing with pollution concerns and making plans to raise the Lihue II, a 61-foot wooden fishing vessel that sank at her mooring at the Port of Ilwaco sometime Friday night or Saturday morning. A citizen reported the sinking to Long Beach Police at 10:14 a.m. Saturday. “Reporting party stated there was a boat that sunk; reporting party does not know if it was sabotage or what,” according to the Pacific County Dispatch media report. click here to read the story 10:28

Investigation continues after death on commercial fishing boat

An official with the U.S. Coast Guard said a boat currently docked in Beaufort returned with a crew member who had died. According to several posts on Facebook, family and friends identified the fisherman as Wesley Vanhook of Bayboro. The Coast Guard said they got a call around 9:15 Sunday that one of the crew members aboard the Little Jesse had received a head injury. Coast Guard Sector NC launched a cutter, which escorted the 75-foot vessel to the Beaufort Inlet. video, click here08:44

On World Fisheries Day FISH-NL reiterates call for Trudeau to apologize to NL for fisheries mismanagement 

The Federation of Independent Sea Harvesters of Newfoundland and Labrador (FISH-NL) is reiterating its call for Prime Minster Justin Trudeau to formally apologize to Newfoundlanders and Labradorians for fisheries mismanagement, which continues to threaten the province’s sustainability. “The Prime Minister is set to apologize to residential school survivors in Labrador, and for LGBTQ persecution, and we’re hopeful his next apology will be to Newfoundlanders and Labradorians for the destruction — under Ottawa’s watch — of our once-great commercial fisheries,” says Ryan Cleary, President of FISH-NL. click here to read the statement 23:58

WDFW delays commercial crab fishery on Washington coast due to low meat content

State shellfish managers have delayed the opening of the commercial Dungeness crab fishery on Washington’s coast due to inadequate meat in crab shells. Recent testing indicates crabs along the coast do not have sufficient meat in their shells to meet industry standards for harvest. The fishery will be delayed until at least Dec. 16 to allow more time for crabs to fill with more meat. Contrary to an erroneous news report, WDFW did not delay the commercial crab fishery due to a harmful algae bloom click here to read the story 17:53

Maine: Scallop license lottery moves forward

More scalloping or more scallopers? That’s the question the Department of Marine Resources is facing with a proposed rule that would establish a lottery system for new scallop fishing licenses. Under a plan announced last week, DMR would issue annually two new scallop dragging licenses for every three surrendered. The department would also issue one new diving license for each one not renewed. click here to read the story 16:31

Northeast Multispecies Fishery; Disapproval of Northeast Fishery Sector IX Operational Plan

Through an Interim Final Rule filed this morning, NOAA Fisheries withdraws approval of the 2017 and 2018 Northeast Fishery Sector IX operations plan. The Regional Administrator determined that the sector and its participants have not complied with the requirements of their approved operations plan, and that the continuation of the Sector IX operations plan will undermine achievement of the conservation and management objectives of the Northeast Multispecies Fishery Management Plan. This action follows the guilty plea and sentencing of Mr. Carlos Rafael, a major participant in Sector IX, who admitted to falsely reporting catch information. click here to read the press release 12:24

New England Council Supports Regional Administrator’s Action to Enforce GroundfishSector IX Operations Plan –  click here to read press release 16:06

Greater Atlantic Region – Our New Community Resilience Website!

We have been working with our Northeast Fisheries Science Center and other partners to address issues of community resilience and to develop ways to support our regional fishing communities. Part of this effort is our new website (click here) that contains information on how we define community resilience, our near and long-term goals, recent workshop proceedings and next steps, as well as links to our partners, data portals, and other resources. Learn how we are supporting our communities as they face regulatory, environmental, and economic challenges from a changing climate, ocean acidification, and other impacts. If you have questions, email NMFS, GAR, Community [email protected] 11:11

AquaBounty’s Stotish responds to Sobeys decision against selling GE salmon

Since the first genetically engineered salmon was sold in Canada this summer, retailers and environmental groups have stepped up their opposition to the product. After four years of review, the Canadian government declared GE salmon safe for consumption and allowed it to be sold in 2016. However, resistance has been growing,,, Retailers have responded, with Sobeys, which operates 15,000 stores across Canada, recently becoming the latest grocery chain in North America to declare that it will not be selling AquaBounty’s AquAdvantage salmon, after Loblaws and Metro declared they would not sell GE salmon earlier this year. click here to read the story 10:40

Perpetrators Who Caused the Death of 69 People Were Convicted in the Wreck of a Trawler in the Sea of ​​Okhotsk

Figures of the criminal case on the death of 69 people as a result of the crash of the Far East trawler in 2015 in the Sea of ​​Okhotsk were sentenced to long terms of imprisonment, the press service of the Prosecutor General’s Office told Interfax on Monday. “The court came to the conclusion that the accident and its consequences are caused by the change in the vessel’s ownership of the ship’s structures, its overload, and the presence of a minimal amount of fuel on board. Moreover, the ship lacked a sufficient number of hydrothermotics and life jackets,,, click here to read the story 10:10

Sleepy deckhand fined after vessel ran aground on auto-pilot

A 19-year-old deckhand who fell asleep at the wheel of a spanner crab vessel that ran aground on auto-pilot at Mooloolaba has been fined $2,500. The skipper and a female passenger were below deck when the boat was beached in the dark in July. No one was hurt but the Matahari was a write-off. Insurance did not cover replacement costs. The stricken vessel became a tourist attraction and was dragged one kilometre up the busy beach before being cut into pieces. photo’s, click here to read the story 09:29

Endangered orcas compete with seals, sea lions for salmon

Harbor seals, sea lions and some fish-eating killer whales have been rebounding along the Northeast Pacific Ocean in recent decades. But that boom has come with a trade-off: They’re devouring more of the salmon prized by a unique but fragile population of endangered orcas. Competition with other marine mammals for the same food may be a bigger problem than fishing, at least in recent years, for southern resident killer whales that spend time in Washington state’s Puget Sound, a new study suggests. click here to read the story 07:43

Appleyard: Pensacola’s fishing industry had a few odd twists

Northwest Florida’s economic history usually places illustrations on the years 1870 to 1965, when over time three large organizations plied the fishing trade. During those years the Sewell Cobb firm, Warren Fish Company and the E.E. Sanders and Company became sizable employers, using a total of as many as 60 well-built smacks for a trade that took the skilled lineman far into the gulf, often off the coast of Mexico. This trade became possible when local ice production provided practical cooling for the fish-filled box cars, the cars coming, of course, when the L&N Railroad’s trackage would bring the fresh-iced fish to markets to the north. Usually the industry is detailed within those factors; however, there were two other tales that illustrated the ingenuity of men in their desire to earn a dollar. click here to read the story 19:02

“Dead in the Water” premiere packed

John Friedrich drove down here from Amesbury on Saturday afternoon for the sole purpose of attending the premiere of the fishing documentary “Dead in the Water” at the Rockport High School auditorium. Friedrich had read a story in the Newburyport Daily News about the documentary that chronicles the demise and unceasing challenges faced by the once-mighty Gloucester groundfish fleet and thought it was something he should see, to gauge for himself the true extent of the problem. “I thought the film was very well done,” he said of the 15th documentary from veteran filmmaker and Rockport native David Wittkower. “But it was also very disturbing, just emotionally disturbing. It’s such a tragedy. The problem is so much more huge than I imagined.” click here to read the story 18:17

20 years later, Hibernia really changed us (and not entirely for the better)

John Gushue – A little more than 20 years ago, I was working on a CBC Television documentary series called East of Canada, which had the aim of covering 500 years of history in Newfoundland and Labrador. It was an ambitious undertaking, even with five one-hour episodes (and, believe me, there are not a whole lot of pictures to describe most of those years). In the spring of 1997, toward the end of production, there was an event that seemed perfect for visual contrast of where the place had been and where it might be going: the towout of the Hibernia platform. We had been chronicling the upheavals of history, the rise and fall of the codfish, the aspirations and dashed dreams of a place that never quite found its economic footing. click here to read the story 16:11

Hokkaido: Poor catches inflate salmon and saury prices ahead of year-end holidays

Poor catches for salmon and saury in the North Pacific have caused prices to spike across Japan as the year-end shopping season begins. In Hokkaido, which accounts for 70 to 80 percent of the nation’s autumn salmon catch, this season’s haul fell by more than 30 percent in the period ended Nov. 10, dropping to around 15.3 million fish, according to the prefecture’s fishery management division.,, In addition, fishermen are struggling with poor catches of saury, a slender but fatty fish popular as an autumn delicacy. click here to read the story 14:48

The science is in — salmon farms need to be out

The salmon-farm debate has come full circle with the recent escape of nearly 200,000 potentially invasive farmed Atlantic salmon 33 kilometres from B.C. waters in Washington state. Over the years, public outrages associated with this industry have unfolded like so many layers of a rotten onion: sea lice, viruses, organic pollution, 10 times the carcinogens in the flesh of farmed salmon versus wild, legal shooting of seal and sea lion “pests,” whales entangled in nets and anchor lines — and the list goes on. This is all unfolding against a backdrop of vehement objections from First Nations. click here to read the story 09:27

PAT NEAL: New threat to our threatened salmon – Here in the Pacific Northwest, there are 19 populations of salmon and steelhead listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. There are many reasons for this. click here to read the story 11:20