Daily Archives: February 25, 2018

Skipper celebrating clean bill of health with trawler Robyn

Castletownbere fisherman Daniel Healy is not only celebrating the launch of his new trawler, but also the 11th anniversary of his kidney transplant. Skipper and owner Daniel purchased the 20m Robyn RJ late last year, and, following some modifications, is now fishing with his crew of four, landing their catch into Castletownbere where he lives with his wife Maureen and their three children. >click to read< 21:22 

Nil’s Stolpe writes, The Magnuson-Stevens amendment I want under the Christmas tree

OVERFISHING! This has become one of the oceans branch of the doom and gloom prognisticator’s (aka Environmental Non Governmental Organizations or ENGOs) principal calls for alms. To wit, they have collectively raked in hundreds of millions of dollars from big business-supported foundations and trusting members of the public to persecute (generally commercial) fishermen who they preach are the cause of “overfishing,” the major threat to the sanctity of the oceans. (I’ll note here that the Pew “Charitable” Trusts was the multibillion dollar foundation that initiated the war on fishermen.) This purposeful misuse of the term “overfishing” has been one of the most subtle and most effective weapons in the anti-fishing activists’ arsenal. Nils Stolpe FishNetUSA >click to read< 18:00

The Women Bringing Sustainable Lobster Fishing Into the Future

For Heather Thompson, lobster fishing is the family trade. As a fourth-generation lobsterman, she captains an all-female crew aboard Gold Digger, her fishing vessel in Harrington, Maine. Using sustainable practices that help Red Lobster maintain its commitment to traceable, sustainable and responsible seafood, Thompson helps ensure that future generations will live a life where the sea provides. >click to watch< 15:40

Ex Accused of Systematic Smelly Seafood Scheme in Tolland

A Trumbull woman is facing a felony charge for a series of actions against an ex-boyfriend from Tolland and the accusations include vandalism and strategically placing seafood in his home and car to create smelly situations, an arrest warrant indicates. The man said their relationship had been deteriorating and they went on a cruise together regardless and things did not go well, according to a warrant. She allegedly told him she once put sardines in an ex-boyfriend’s car air conditioning vent for revenge, a warrant states. >click to read< 12:50

Please Bring Our Boys Back Home – Song to remember lost fishermen races up charts

A new song in memory of two Scottish fishermen who were lost when the Nancy Glen prawn trawler sank is climbing the charts. Yesterday morning, within hours of its release, Please Bring Our Boys Back Home, was racing up the download charts of Amazon and iTunes.,,  Proceeds will go to the families of Tarbert fishermen Duncan MacDougall, 46, and Przemek Krawczyk, 38, who lost their lives when their boat sank in Loch Fyne, a mile from their home village, on 18 January.A third crewman, John Miller, 34, also from Tarbert, survived after being rescued by a passing vessel. >click to read< >click to play, or download<11:22

Their View! Building trust with fishermen is key for wind energy companies

There’s a lot of buzz in New Bedford these days about the offshore wind industry- and for good reason. Blowing in with the massive turbines will be the promise of good-paying jobs; new activity along with the waterfront; and even the prospect that SouthCoast could become a training center for those interested in offshore wind careers.,, Amid the hubbub, however, we can’t lose track of the industry that has made New Bedford the most lucrative seafood port in the nation for 17 years in a row,  The city’s hard-working fishermen-beset by changing regulations, dwindling catches, competition from foreign fleets and the ever-present hardship of storm-tossed seas-must be given serious consideration in any changes,,,>click to read<10:40 

China, Spain, Taiwan, Japan and S Korea account for 85% global fishing efforts

The research, led by scientists at Global Fishing Watch, a research organization that uses satellite data to track fishing activity, examined some 22 billion ship-location data points for more than 70,000 industrial fishing vessels between 2012 and 2016. It found commercial fishing hotspots in the northeast Atlantic and northwest Pacific, as well as in nutrient-rich areas off the coasts of South America and West Africa. The study also found that fleets from just five countries — China, Spain, Taiwan, Japan, and South Korea — account for more than 85% of fishing efforts in the high seas. >click to read< 09:51