Monthly Archives: July 2018

Stonington fishermen to hold open house on Saturday at Gambardella’s Wholesale Seafood at the Town Dock

The town’s commercial fishermen will hold an open house from noon to 4 p.m. on Saturday, July 28, at the Gambardella’s Wholesale Seafood location at the Town Dock. The event is being billed as an opportunity for residents to meet fishermen, local retailers and restaurants and find out what types of seafood are for sale locally this time of year and how the fish are processed and prepared for the local market. There will be an opportunity for people to go aboard a working fishing boat and learn how it operates as well as meet fishermen, ask them questions and learn what issues are concerning to them. >click to read<17:32

Here’s why ice was a hot commodity in the Nushagak this summer

Bristol Bay’s Nushagak fishing district pulled in more than a million sockeye on eight separate days earlier this month. Before this summer, it had only done that twice in Bristol Bay’s history.
Keeping all those fish cool proved problematic for fishermen who still rely on slush ice. Capt. Nick Sotiropoulos of the fishing vessel Flyin’ Tiger said he’d like at least 1,000 pounds of ice for every opener to keep his catch cold and earn that chilled quality bonus from his processor.,, Just over 10 percent of Bristol Bay’s fleet relies on ice to chill their fish. Another 27 percent turn over unchilled fish to processors, and the final 63 percent are drift boats with refrigerated sea water systems. >click to read<14:43

Seaforth man who fell off fishing vessel remembered for his ‘irrepressible spirit’

A 58-year-old Seaforth, N.S., man who fell off a fishing boat late Thursday night, is being remembered for his dedication to saving wild animals and his “irrepressible spirit.” Reid Steward Patterson was swordfishing about 65 kilometres off the coast of Halifax when he fell into the water. An exhaustive search by air and sea lasted 23 hours, but searchers weren’t able to locate his body. On Friday night, Joint Task Force Atlantic handed the search over to the Halifax District RCMP. Patterson was instrumental in the growth of Hope for Wildlife, a refuge for wounded animals in Seaforth. He was also the founder, Hope Swinimer’s, partner. >click to read<11:49

Search for man who fell overboard southeast of Halifax handed over to RCMP – >click to read<

Stop efforts to kill salmon and fishing jobs

Today, many Northern California commercial fishermen sit in harbors along our coast worrying about their bills and waiting for another disastrously shortened salmon season to begin. Many businesses that serve the normally robust sport salmon fishery also have suffered because of the delay. River fishing guides have lost half their season as well. Salmon numbers are predicted to be down from the lingering effects of the last drought and the damaging water allocation decisions that put salmon fishing families last. Meanwhile, San Joaquin Valley congressmen are hard at work tilting the balance of water in California toward valley agricultural barons. >click to read<10:48

This strange, lobster-fueled border dispute off Maine has been simmering long before Trump

The conflict was recently cast into international focus after reports that U.S. Border Patrol agents were stopping Canadian fishermen in the area, causing a modest uproar in the Great White North. It was likely the first time many Americans had even heard of Machias Seal Island, if the story broke through at all. Once dubbed the “Coldest War,” the quiet dispute over the tiny, meadow-topped island and its surrounding waters has been simmering for more than two centuries, consisting of puffins, lobster, and a few legendarily provincial Mainers. And this dispute has been festering since the Revolutionary War. >click to read<09:47

BASE Seafood Auction set to unveil revolutionary software to buoy groundfish industry

In his dimly lit second floor office surrounded by artifacts of the past, from antique license plates to model fishing vessels to family photos, Richie Canastra resurrected memories of the fish auction. “You know many people said I was crazy? I was young,” Canastra, the co-owner of the Buyers and Sellers Exchange (BASE). Canastra and his brother Ray, started the Whaling City Auction in 1994 when the city-owned auction ended. The display style auction  crafted by the brothers caused friction within the industry. It promoted a buyer beware attitude, which forced buyers to pay what they bid, unlike the old system, when buyers often altered their bid after they won by questioning the quality of the landing. >click to read<09:01

Another dead sturgeon found as review of turbines threat remains in planning process

Another dead sturgeon has been found downstream of the Annapolis Tidal Turbine. Meanwhile a promised review of whether the 20 megawatt turbine kills fish at population levels by the Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat remains in the planning process. “The terms of reference for the review have been drafted,” said Debbie Buott-Matheson, spokeswoman for Fisheries and Oceans Canada, in a written response. “We have not yet set a date for a CSAS peer review meeting, but it is considered a priority going forward.” That review was announced in January after a series of stories in the Chronicle Herald detailing how the turbine, which opened in a causeway crossing the Annapolis River in 1982, was never granted an exemption under the Fisheries Act to kill fish. >click to read<18:58

Bay of Fundy: Right whales trigger fishing area closure, gear must be removed from Grand Manan Basin by 6 p.m. Sunday

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans has announced more fishing closures in the Atlantic region due to the presence of right whales. DFO said two right whales were spotted in the Grand Manan Basin — critical habitat area in the Bay of Fundy. The area will be closed to fishing beginning Sunday at 6 p.m. until further notice. All gear must be removed from the closed area before that time. The fisheries affected include groundfish species, herring, mackerel and lobster, DFO said. >click to read<15:05

Moving salmon farms on land vital

You may have heard that the federal government has a new minister of Fisheries, Oceans and Canadian Coast Guard. Unlike his predecessor from the east, Jonathan Wilkinson is a West Coast man. Also unlike his predecessor, he will understand what the wild salmon mean to all of us on the B.C. coast. From Indigenous communities to whom the salmon have given physical and spiritual sustenance for millennia, to tourist and commercial fishing, and all of us who want to eat wild salmon that is unadulterated from chemicals; to bears and marine animals who depend on the wild runs, and the forests who are fed by salmon carcasses, the wild salmon is part of who we all are. by Paula Foot >click to read<12:00

Environmental Citations Issued For Boat Captain During NOAA Environmental Research Cruise

The captain of a charter boat carrying government scientists on an environmental research cruise near the Keys has been cited for violating environmental regulations. The Ultimate Getaway is a 100-foot charter boat that takes people to the remote Tortugas, west of Key West, for diving and spearfishing trips. This month, it was chartered by the federal government for the Coral Reef Monitoring Program research cruise, which surveys reef and fish in Florida every other year. The FWC patrol saw the Ultimate Getaway at anchor inside the reserve. When they came alongside, they saw fishing poles and gear on the vessel’s stern, according to the FWC report. >click to read<11:19

Why the fishing industry is against offshore wind farms near Ocean City

Representatives say wind farms could cause harm by driving marine wildlife away, disturbing the ocean environment and making navigation more difficult for fishers and mariners. “Now with the current offshore wind leasing process, we have these fishing grounds being sold right out from under us,” said Meghan Lapp during a recent presentation to the Ocean City Town Council. But marine biologists and wind farm officials say the impact won’t be that severe. “I think they took an emotional approach to the problem. … So there was some degree of misinformation,” said Salvo Vitale, general counsel for U.S. Wind, one of the offshore wind energy companies involved in the Maryland project. The town’s officials feel very strongly that this project was misrepresented to them because the size of the wind turbines has increased since the initial proposal,,, >click to read<10:18

The Pacific Balance Pinnipeds Society – New group calls for seal and sea lion cull on B.C.’s coast

Members of the Tsawwassen First Nation are teaming up with commercial and sport-fishers on B.C.’s coast to call on the new federal fisheries minister to allow a West Coast seal and sea lion harvest. The group, called the Pacific Balance Pinnipeds Society, says that growing populations of seals and sea lions endangers future salmon populations. “If we want to see salmon around for our next generations, we have to go out there and bring that balance to the animal kingdom,” said Thomas Sewid, the director of the newly established society. “To go out, harvest those seals, utilize the whole carcass so the meats are going to markets in Europe and China, the fat is being rendered down for the omega 3s.” >click to read<09:00

Controversial arctic surf clam decision stays as new federal Fisheries Minister outlines his vision for DFO

A controversial arctic surf clam decision will not be revisited under new federal Fisheries Minister Jonathan Wilkinson. Wilkinson became the head of the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) on July 18, being shuffled into cabinet by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. Previous to his cabinet appointment, Wilkinson was parliamentary secretary to Environment Minister Catherine McKenna. His area of focus was how to save caribou herds across the country. Wilkinson says there’s no need to view the environment and the economy as two different things. >click to read<

DEC Announces Public Information Sessions to Modernize and Reform State’s Commercial Fishing Licensing System

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Basil Seggos announced today that the agency is holding a series of meetings across the State’s Marine and Coastal District in July and August to gather feedback from key stakeholders about the State’s current commercial fishing licensing system and ideas for reforms to modernize and improve the program. In March 2018, DEC retained the services of an expert marine fisheries consultant, George LaPointe, who will facilitate the meetings to be held in Brooklyn, East Setauket, Freeport, Southampton, Staten Island, Southold >click to read<19:05

Coast Guard suspends search for man overboard in Ugashik Bay, has been identified

The Coast Guard suspended its search Friday for a man reported overboard from the 190-foot fishing vessel Cape Greig in Ugashik Bay, Alaska. A Coast Guard Air Station Kodiak HC-130 Hercules aircraft crew, a Station Kodiak MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew and nine good Samaritan vessels searched a total of 13-square miles along the Ugashik Bay shoreline and up the river in efforts to locate the man. On Thursday, at approximately 4:27 p.m., Communications Detachment Kodiak personnel received a report of a man overboard from the fishing vessel Cape Greig. photo credit vesselfinder.com >click to read<

Overboard fisherman sought near Pilot Point – Grant Hildreth Jr., 25, reportedly fell into the river at about 4 p.m., troopers said in an online dispatch. Word of the fall was relayed to troopers by the village public safety officer in Pilot Point. >click to read<16:21

Reps. Poliquin and Pingree co-sponsor amendment to HR-200

In an effort to cut unnecessary federal fees for lobstermen, dealers and processors, Congressman Bruce Poliquin (R-2nd Dist.) and Congresswoman Chellie Pingree (D-1st Dist.) joined forces across the political aisle to amend a fisheries bill that is currently before the U.S. Senate. The bill, H.R. 200 – Strengthening Fishing Communities and Increasing Flexibility in Fisheries Management Act, passed the U.S. House 222-193 on July 11. The amendment, offered by Poliquin and co-sponsored by Pingree, directs NOAA to conduct a study of all fees imposed on all sectors of the lobster industry. >click to read<14:03

Board of Fisheries declares low Chignik sockeye returns an emergency

Like many Gulf of Alaska communities, far fewer sockeye are returning to the Chignik River than forecasted. Chignik has an early and late run. The combined escapement goal for July 20 is 416,000 sockeye. As of July 18, only 222,000 sockeye had made it upriver to spawn. With no harvestable surplus, the Chignik Management area has not had a commercial fishing opportunity targeting sockeye. Further, some residents say they are voluntarily forgoing subsistence fishing to boost escapement. Audio report, >click to read<13:24

U.S. Coast Guard investigates fishing vessel for knowingly discharging oil in Canadian waters

Investigators from Coast Guard Sector Anchorage and Marine Safety Detachment Dutch Harbor, and Coast Guard Investigative Service agents are investigating the fishing vessel Mark I for knowingly discharging oil overboard in Canadian waters. A Transport Canada aircrew detected the Mark I transiting through the Canadian exclusive economic zone 97-miles off of Cape St. James, British Columbia, with an approximate 26-mile oil sheen trailing behind, July 7. (photo credit vesselfinder.com)>click to read<11:12

Fishermen’s group grateful DFO lays charge stemming from lobster raid

A fishermen’s association is pleased to see the Department of Fisheries and Oceans lay a charge against the owner of lobster pound in southwest Nova Scotia who is accused of selling lobster caught under an Aboriginal communal fishing licence. Colin Sproul, vice-president of the Bay of Fundy Inshore Fishermen’s Association, said he’s grateful DFO is taking action this summer. “Last summer, there were an incredible amount of lobsters poached in southwest Nova Scotia,” Sproul said on Thursday. “They weren’t First Nations people poaching these lobsters. They were just being poached by poachers under the guise of the FSC [food, social and ceremonial] and sold. >click to read<10:28

Protect Shem Creek’s shrimpers

Without its shrimp boat fleet, Shem Creek in Mount Pleasant would be a different kind of place. But the number of boats has been dwindling for decades, and the loss of the dock that formerly housed the Wando Shrimp Co. could be a tipping point. The Wando dock is up for sale. And unless a nonprofit buyer such as the East Cooper Land Trust or even the town of Mount Pleasant is able to scoop up the property, it could be redeveloped in a way that would push out a few more of the remaining shrimpers in the creek. That would be a shame. Shem Creek and the nearby Old Village form the unofficial heart of Mount Pleasant. >click to read<09:46

Testing ropeless fishing gear

A test of ropeless fishing gear could protect the livelihoods of lobster fishermen and lives of North Atlantic right whales. Industry is totally against this, Lobsterman David Casoni announced from his Margaret M fishing boat tied up at the dock of the Sandwich Marina, Gear manufacturer Marco Flagg had stepped aboard holding his cylinder attached to a mesh bag filled with rope and floats. But, Casoni said, the states 1200 commercial lobstermen could be interested in the equipment under certain conditions. >click to read<08:54

Sam Parisi: HR-200 was passed in the House and will now move on to the Senate. Push Your Senators!

There has been a lot of those for and against the bill, and after reading the forty-nine pages of the bill and trying to consume it, I have come to the conclusion that over all it is a move in the right direction. The enactment of the 200 mile limit was needed because of foreign fisherman from other countries were destroying our Fisheries and our government at that time had no jurisdiction, Japanese and Russian Factory Ships were invading our waters using small mesh netting scooping up small fish like haddock, cod, flounder, and other bottom dwelling species. I say this because while fishing for whiting off the Canyons near Cape Cod I saw in front of me and fishing along side of me, those factory ships. >click to read<17:48

Congress must choose threatened salmon over sea lions

State, federal and local governments have spent too much time and money restoring fish runs in the Columbia River Basin to let those efforts go to waste. The U.S. House recognized this reality last month by passing legislation to make it easier to kill sea lions that feast on threatened salmon and steelhead in the Columbia River and its tributaries. Now, the Senate must step up and push the bill through to the finish line. Northwest senators must be unified in their support for this common-sense measure, which aims to safeguard the billions of dollars invested in preserving fish that are listed under the Endangered Species Act.>click to read<

Not including our seal products in the E.U. agreement is another nail in the coffin of the N.L. fishery

This is in response to a letter published in the Telegram June 30 by Premier Dwight Ball titled “PC’s ill-informed on Trade Matters,” where he states “I am amazed that the PC Finance critic, Keith Hutchings, is so ill-informed on a trade related matter.” It’s like the pot calling the kettle black. This letter is not to defend MHA Hutchings and the PC’s — they are quite capable of defending themselves — but to point out the lack willingness of this premier to negotiate in good faith for the people of Newfoundland and Labrador. >click to read<14:51

Biloxi Shrimpers say season is ‘mediocre’ so far

The brown shrimp season began about a month and a half ago, and so far, local shrimpers are reporting mixed results. “Our preliminary numbers so far show that we are below average, but we hope that would pick up as we get further into the brown shrimp season,” said Rick Burris, Shrimp and Crab Director for the Mississippi Department of Marine Resources. “What we’ve been seeing is low numbers, but the shrimp they are catching are good marketable size.”Down on the docks, some shrimpers say this season can best be described as mediocre. Video, >click to read<14:04

Hoopa Valley Tribe Plans Federal Lawsuit to ‘Protect Salmon on the Brink of Extinction’

The Hoopa Valley Tribe (Tribe) today announced that it will file a lawsuit within 60 days unless federal agencies reduce the numbers of Endangered Species Act (ESA) listed Klamath-Trinity origin Coho salmon being killed in the Pacific Ocean. Klamath River origin Coho salmon have been listed as a ‘threatened species’ under the ESA since 1997. Without analysis or formal ESA re-consultation, regulations of the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC) were changed this year to allow more Coho salmon to be injured or killed, although they are protected by the ESA. “We will not stand by while the federal agencies kill our salmon,” said Hoopa Tribal Chairman Ryan Jackson. >click to read<13:30

New Bedford: NOAA lifts groundfish ban – Approval in place immediately

Nearly eight months to the day after NOAA closed groundfishing for Carlos Rafael vessels, the agency lifted the ban on Thurday that had put 80 fishermen out of work. NOAA announced the approval for lease-only operations plan for Sector IX and allocated quota for Sector VII. “Continuing to withhold this amount of quota from the fishery significantly hampers the ability of the fishery as a whole to operate,” NOAA said in the 17 page document. >click to read<10:59

NOAA Fisheries sent this bulletin at 07/19/2018 11:16 AM EDT-NOAA Fisheries Approves Lease-Only Operations Plan for Sector 9, Amendment to Sector 7 Operations Plan, and Quota Allocations for Sectors 7 and 9 – >click to read<11:39

62nd Annual Disabled Vet’s Day Fishing Outing – Veterans hit the seas for annual fishing trip

The boats set off from the Quincy Yacht Club in Houghs Neck on Wednesday morning. Local lobstermen and charter fishermen donated their boats and their time to take the veterans on a three-hour fishing trip around Quincy Bay and Boston Harbor. When the veterans returned around 1:30 p.m. with about 20 flounder in tow, they were greeted with a Thanksgiving-style lunch and entertainment, including a DJ. The fish they caught will be donated. This year marked the 62nd year for the fishing tradition and a particularly special year for organizer Michael Cheney, who has been involved with the event for 41 years. This year, Cheney’s father, 94-year-old Tom Cheney, was the guest of honor. Lots of photo’s! >click to read<09:19

Coast Guard rescues 2 survivors clinging to debris in Pamlico Sound, NC

Two men were rescued by a Coast Guard helicopter crew Wednesday morning, after their fishing boat capsized Tuesday near Hog Island.,, The wife of a fishermen called for help Tuesday night, on behalf of her husband, reporting the generator on the men’s boat was not working properly and the men were trying to find safety near shore in the deteriorating weather. They had departed Ocracoke Tuesday morning and were planning to shrimp in Pamlico Sound before unloading their catch in Engelhard. >click to read<07:54

It’s a-boat time Pacific City celebrates unique maritime heritage with Dory Days Festival

For more than 100 years, dory boats have gone out to sea from Pacific City. And for the locals, dory fishing is not only their heritage, their pride and their way of life — it’s also their addiction of sorts. “When I haven’t had a dory I was going through the D.T.s,” said Skip Bailey, who has been dory fishing for nearly 40 years. “We grew up as dory people and we live and breathe that stuff.” He’s not kidding, according to other dory devotees. “Sometimes in the winter I just go and sit inside my dory and have a beer — it’s so nice,” said Capt. Mark Lytle, who runs pacificcityfishing.com. “Every person who has a dory will understand, because they do the same thing.” >click to read<20:17