You should read this. Right whale extinction crisis gains momentum on Capitol Hill

Leaders from industry, science and advocacy convened on Capitol Hill this week for a congressional briefing and panel discussion on the North Atlantic right whale extinction crisis. Despite being a busy week in Congress, the room was packed with attendees interested in learning more about the status of the right whale and opportunities for Congress to support the recovery of the species. NRDC cosponsored the briefing and I had the pleasure of presenting on the panel, which was held in cooperation with Representatives Seth Moulton (D-MA) and Jared Huffman (D-CA). The panel provided a compelling overview of the severe threat posed by entanglement, ongoing and future actions aimed at reducing right whale deaths, and the international cooperation needed to secure the whale’s future. >click to read<20:51

Fishery Disaster Assistance Soon to Be Available to Georgia Shrimpers

The Southern Shrimp Alliance is pleased to inform the Georgia shrimp industry that $1.062m in financial assistance has been made available to address the 2013 Georgia shrimp fishery disaster. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross announced the funding in a March 27, 2019 press release. In a February 10, 2014, letter to then U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker, then Georgia Governor Nathan Deal filed a request for fishery disaster assistance pursuant to section 312(a) of the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act (MSA). >click to read<17:07

Climate change is now a fact of life in Atlantic Canada fishery

The Atlantic Ocean is one of the most productive marine environments in the world, with an abundance of marine organisms from crabs, to lobsters and wild fish stocks, supporting over 55,000 jobs in industries like fishing, aquaculture, and tourism. On April 10, the Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, the Honourable Jonathan Wilkinson released what is the first Atlantic Ocean status report, called Canada’s Oceans Now–Atlantic Ecosystems,2018 >click to read<15:52

Ipswich editorial: Green crabs – Time to chomp down on the threat

They look so small and creepy, almost like tarantulas — about the size of a palm, with their legs and two front pincers wriggling. It’s hard to imagine the crabs could destroy a multi-million dollar local businesses and the 20,000-acre Great Marsh, spawning grounds for many local fish. But the green crabs can. More importantly, the voracious, invasive green crabs are. The crabs destroy both the Great Marsh — because they uproot the eel grass that anchors the marsh — and fisheries, such as the clamming industry, oystering and even lobstering because the crabs eat clams, oysters and juvenile lobsters. >click to read<14:07