Monthly Archives: May 2020

Legal battle brewing over where shrimp trawlers can fish in North Carolina

One conservation group in North Carolina is taking a stand, saying fish like Gray Trout and Croaker can’t survive if commercial shrimp trawlers are allowed to run their nets in the Pamlico Sound. “We’ve seen a decline in the past 40 years in our fin fish populations, most recently the southern flounder, which is probably the most favorite fish we have here in North Carolina,” said Joe Albea, a spokesperson for the NC Coastal Fisheries Reform Group. A representative from the Division of Marine Fisheries tells Nine on Your Side they have received the notice and are reviewing it. video, >click to read< 19:32

A Fundraiser for The Men of St. Lawrence

Right now they’re is one beautiful woman who has lost her husband, son, and nephew in this tragedy. 3 other woman won’t get to see they’re husbands walk through the door. 6 kids have to grow up with out the support of they’re dads. So as I sit here thinking of my dear friend Scott and all the others, I can’t help but want to try and support they’re families as much as I can,,, Chris Cusick. >click to read< , and please, donate if you can! Thank you

Despite mother’s pleas, search efforts are over for missing St. Lawrence fisherman

After the deaths of three fishermen at sea, the southern Newfoundland town of St. Lawrence is in shock, while the mother of a missing fourth man is pleading with officials to continue a search for her son. The search for family friend Isaac Kettle ended 8:45 p.m. Wednesday night. But Kettle’s mother, Aundriette Kettle, said Thursday she wants extra equipment to find and raise the Sarah Anne from the ocean, as she believes her son’s body is still on the vessel. “Them other bodies were found, [but] my son is on that boat. He needs to be brought up, they [need] to get cameras, things like that, on that ocean to bring him up,” Kettle said. “Isaac needs to be home to us, his family.” >click to read< 14:32

Fishing less could be a win for both lobstermen and endangered whales – they never mention ship strikes

A new study by researchers at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) found that New England’s historic lobster fishery may turn a higher profit by operating with less gear in the water and a shorter season. The findings could provide a path forward for the lobster fishing industry, which is under pressure to move away from traditional pot fishing that uses long vertical lines of rope known to entangle and kill endangered North Atlantic right whales and other protected species. The study was published this week in the journal Marine Policy. “The story the data tells is optimistic,” says lead author Hannah Myers, a graduate student at the University of Alaska Fairbanks and a guest student at WHOI. “Entanglements often cause chronic injury, stress, and even starvation if the animal doesn’t immediately drown,” says Michael Moore, a coauthor of the paper and director of WHOI’s Marine Mammal Center. >click to read<  12:06

Most likely Carnival Cruise Lines is responsible for 18+ Right Whale deaths in the past 3 year, at which rate they would soon be extinct. – >click to read<

North Atlantic Right Whale: How to kill a species with Fake News, from National Geographic of all places! – >click to read<

Commercial Fisheries and Fishermen Can Apply for CARES Relief But Not Yet

On May 7, the Secretary of Commerce announced the allocation of $300 million in fisheries assistance funding provided to states, tribes, and territories with coastal and marine fishery participants who have been negatively affected by COVID-19. As a next step, the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration will use these allocations to make awards to its partners – the interstate marine fisheries commissions, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands – to disburse funds to address direct or indirect fishery-related losses as well as subsistence, cultural or ceremonial impacts related to COVID-19. But relief may take some time. No funds have yet been made available to the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission or states. The N.J. Department of Environmental Protection staff is working diligently to develop a spending plan and application process that must be approved by NOAA. >click to read< 11:07

Photo’s: Fishing in Provincetown 40 years ago

Provincetown 1979, Culling the catch–discarding the anemones and crabs and other bottom life that came up in the net-always drew a crowd of gulls. Here the crew of Pat Sea, skippered by Manuel Macara, culls near Race Point. Cape Cod Times photographer Milton Moore captured these Provincetown fishing images 40-plus years ago. 37 photo’s >click to review< 09:15

Coast Guard Ends Search for Isaac Kettle, Missing St. Lawrence Fisherman

The Coast Guard officially wound down its search for the last victim of a boating tragedy in Placentia Bay last evening. Officials said after an intensive search spanning 650 nautical miles, they believe there will no longer be any reasonable chance of survival for the fourth crew member. Three bodies were recovered from the ocean off St. Lawrence on Tuesday. The incident has now been turned over to the RCMP as a missing persons case. The Coast Guard is thanking the many volunteers who joined the search effort, and they send their condolences to the loved ones of all four crew members aboard the Sarah Anne and the entire community of St. Lawrence. >click to read< 08:18

Fishermen lost off St. Lawrence remembered as ‘the finest kind of people’

Family and friends of three fishermen whose bodies were recovered off the coast of St. Lawrence, and one still missing at sea, are remembering them as kind and hard-working people. The search for family friend Isaac Kettle, believed to be in his early 30s, will end at 8:45 p.m. NT, according to the coast guard. All four men went missing in the mouth of Placentia Bay, off the southeast coast of Newfoundland,,, When they were not back before 8   p.m. that evening, a search and rescue mission began and the Canadian Coast Guard was called.,, Eric Reeves, a fisherman of 30 years, joined in the search for his friends. Around 7:30 a.m. Tuesday, he said, he found some items from the boat floating in the water. “We found a coffee mug belong to the skipper’s son and his name was wrote on it, and then we knew there was some tragedy happened,” said Reeves. “When you find something that you don’t want to find, I’ll tell ya, it’s heartbreaking.” >click to read< 18:13

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 50’x20’6″ Herring Seiner with Fed Class A Herring Permit

To review specifications, information and 31 photos, >click here< Vessel is in good condition. To see all the boats in this series, >click here<14:15

Fishermen Finding Windows Of Opportunity, Necessity Opened By Coronavirus

“Guys are getting creative,” said Edward Warner Jr., a commercial bayman from Hampton Bays. “You have some guys going on the internet and selling and going to the green markets in the city more. Different people are trying different things to make few bucks here and there.” Before the epidemic, the majority of fish landed by local boats was simply packed in waxed cardboard boxes, topped with crushed ice and trucked into New York City’s central seafood market in Hunts Point, Brooklyn.,,, In mid-March, when restaurants and thousands of other businesses were ordered to close, and people scrambled to pack into their homes and venture out as little as possible, prices for fish cratered.  >click to read< 12:25

“Minister Michael Creed and his officials have effectively turned their backs on the fishing industry.”

That view from Castletownbere in West Cork by the chief executive of the Irish South and West Fish Producers, Patrick Murphy, criticising the minister for the marine who is from Macroom in mid-Cork, represents a new low in relationships between the industry and the Government. The country’s four major fish producer organisations are in serious dispute with the Department of the Marine over assistance the industry has sought due to the Covid 19 pandemic. The department has rejected the industry’s view. Today is crucial in the dispute. It is the closing day for applications to be made for inclusion in a support scheme offered by the department, which has been described by the Irish South and West Fish Producers in Castletownbere as “botched and unfit for purpose.” >click to read< 10:16

St. Lawrence family, residents devastated by deaths of well known fishermen whom perished at sea

Eileen Norman broke down in tears as she spoke about the three St. Lawrence men, her family members who perished at sea. She was referring to her brother-in-law, Ed Norman, 67, his son Scott Norman, 35, and his nephew Jody Norman, 42, whose bodies were recovered Tuesday morning from the frigid waters off the coast of the Burin Peninsula on the province’s south coast. As of The Telegram’s deadline, one man was still missing, Isaac Kettle, who is said to be in his early 30s. The four men left St. Lawrence in Ed Norman’s 36-foot fishing vessel, Sara Anne, about 12:30 a.m. Monday to go crab fishing, Eileen Norman said. >click to read< 09:25

F/V Orin C Lawsuit – Lawyers say Samaritan, mayor threatened consultant

On Dec. 3, 2015, Capt. David “Heavy D” Sutherland died in the water after his disabled slime-eel boat, the Orin C, sank while under tow by the Coast Guard back into Gloucester Harbor. Now, an ongoing federal lawsuit filed by two surviving Orin C crew members and Sutherland’s estate has erupted with accusations of witness tampering involving Mayor Sefatia Romeo Theken and fisherman Philip Powell of Swampscott, the good Samaritan who is a co-defendant in the case and whose vessel F/V Foxy Lady was the first to come to the aid of the Orin C. The witness is Gloucester Harbormaster T.J. Ciarametaro, who through his Five Fathoms Consulting firm, is retained as an expert witness by plaintiffs’ attorney, Joseph M. Orlando Jr. of the Gloucester firm Orlando & Associates. Orlando’s motion also accuses Gloucester lobsterman Arthur “Sooky” Sawyer, the current president of the Massachusetts Lobstermen’s Association, of contributing to a pressure campaign against Ciarametaro, a Coast Guard veteran. >click to read< 08:05

Please, Donate if You Can to the San Francisco fishing fleet fire recovery fund

An early morning fire destroyed Pier 45, Shed C on May 23. While we were fortunate not to lose any lives in this tragedy, San Francisco fishing men & women have lost millions of dollars in fishing gear. We are asking for any help you can give at this time. Donated funds will be used to reequip fishing businesses with the gear necessary to continue working and bringing fresh seafood to San Francisco. As a community, we have lost approximately 2/3 of the capacity to harvest the fresh seafood that is delivered to San Francisco and the essence of our livelihoods. Crab traps and salmon tanks and hydraulic blocks and herring nets and buoys and black cod traps and shrimp traps and replacement transmissions and spare parts and tools and extra propellers and forklifts and and… and… please, >click to read<, and donate if you can! The Crab Boat Owners Association is organizing this fundraiser. 23:30

Average forecast as shrimp season opens May 27 in South Carolina

Commercial shrimp trawling will open in all legal South Carolina waters at 8 a.m. on Wednesday, May 27, 2020. Georgia officials have not yet set an opening date for trawling season in their state waters. Shrimping season in South Carolina typically starts in spring with the opening of a small subset of waters, called provisional areas, that allow shrimpers to take advantage of the harvest offshore while still protecting the majority of shrimp that have yet to spawn. This year, following a mild winter, South Carolina’s provisional trawling areas opened unusually early, on April 15, 2020. >click to read< 22:38

YouTube Cancels Michael Moore Produced Green Energy Documentary, “Planet of the Humans”

Finally, YouTube has found the flimsy pretext it needed to cancel the controversial Michael Moore-produced eco-documentary which has been infuriating greenies with its anti-renewables message: ‘copyright infringement.’ Planet of the Humans, the documentary executive-produced by Moore and written and directed by his friend Jeff Gibbs has racked up over 8 million views on YouTube since its launch last month. But now — in what Gibbs says is a “blatant act of censorship” — YouTube has taken down the video. Filmmaker Jeff Gibbs is surely correct when he says that YouTube’s cancellation of the documentary is politically motivated. >click to read<16:43

Michael Moore and Driessen agree! Wind, solar and biofuel energy are devastating Planet Earth – Never in my wildest dreams did I envision a day when I’d agree with anything filmmaker Michael Moore said – much less that he would agree with me. But this new film, Planet of the Humans, is as devastating an indictment of wind, solar and biofuel energy as anything I have ever written. The documentary reflects Moore’s willingness to reexamine environmentalist doctrine.  >click to read<

UPDATE: Bodies of three St. Lawrence fishermen recovered, one fisherman still missing off Newfoundland’s south coast

The Canadian Coast Guard has recovered the body of a third fisherman missing off the coast of St. Lawrence, and crews are still searching for one other missing man. One man’s body was found at 4:15 a.m. local time on Tuesday, the second man’s body was found at 11:15 a.m., and the third man’s body was found at 11:40 a.m. Crews continue their search and rescue mission this afternoon.  Five fishing boats are involved in the search, along with the coast guard vessel Ann Harvey, a Cormorant helicopter and a Hercules aircraft. >click to read< 14:24

One man still missing, search and rescue efforts continue – The bodies of Ed Norman, 67, his son Scott, 35, and his nephew Jody, 42, have been recovered off the province’s south coast following a marine accident that occurred after the men, along with an Isaac Kettle left the Burin Peninsula community’s harbour at 12:30 a.m. Monday. Kettle, thought to be in his early 30s, is still missing and search and rescue efforts to locate him are continuing. >click to read< 14:29

Stolen Grand Manan Boat Found In Maine

A possible joy ride into American waters causing shock and upset for a Grand Manan fisherman who discoved his lobster boat missing on Monday morning. Sherman Kinghorne of Special K Fisheries owns “Grampa’s Legacy” and he noticed the boat was gone about 4 a.m. as he was leaving to go fishing. “The vessel was not at the wharf. We thought someone may have been playing a prank. We looked to the wharf to the left of us, no vessel. At that point, we started calling RCMP, Fundy Coast Guard radio, Fundy traffic.” Kinghorne said.,, “It wasn’t 20-25 minutes after putting that call out, an American lobster boat spotted her.” Kinghorne said. >click to read< 12:10

Alabama: Shrimpers having tough spring season

The COVID-19 global pandemic has caused the price of shrimp paid to fishermen to plummet, causing many to stay home. Those who are on the water say they are not having much luck finding shrimp. The season began on Monday, May 18, and only a sparse number of boats can be seen dotting the waters. Dock operators and shrimpers say COVID-19 caused restaurants to sell few shrimp, and this has meant processors haven’t moved much product. The low demand for new shrimp has dropped the normal $1.85 per pound for larger shrimp down to $1.05. Smaller shrimp, normally fetching near a dollar per pound, has dropped below $.50. Morris Liner, a shrimper of 42 years, said that the windfall that the lower oil prices could have brought has not materialized. >click to read< 11:14

UPDATED- Search Underway. Breaking: 1 body found, 3 still missing in search for commercial fishermen near St. Lawrence

The Canadian Coast Guard has recovered the body of a fisherman off the coast of St. Lawrence, and crews are still searching for three other missing men. The four men went missing in the mouth of Placentia Bay, after leaving from St. Lawrence shortly after midnight to fish crab, and were due back before 8 p.m. Monday evening, but did not arrive. “We found some debris in the water, and obviously the crew member, so we know whatever happened is tragic and probably happened quickly,” said Mark Gould, the regional supervisor at the Maritime Rescue Sub Centre in St. John’s. “But, y’know, we’re still searching. We’ll search until we’ve exhausted all measures and possibilities.” >click to read< 09:58

Three others still missing, search and rescue efforts underway  – “We’re in complete shock,” St. Lawrence’s assistant town clerk Eileen Norman,,, Her brother-in-law, Ed Norman, 67, went out in a 36-foot fishing boat with his son, Scott Norman, 35, and nephew, Jody Norman, 42. The other man, Isaac Kettle, is a friend in his early 30s, she said. >click to read<

NOAA – Their mission

Back in the sixties when I was fishing with my dad we would fish about a one hundred miles east of New Bedford for whiting in the spring. We had a ninety foot dragger. And there were Russian vessels there that were three hundred foot  and they were using a small mesh net that caught everything in the water. At the time there was no 200 mile limit. The Russians and other foreign vessels could come into our waters and were restricted to within fifteen miles of our coast. Today  no one knows how much damage they did but our fisherman would eventually pay the price. Finally in 1978, we enacted the 200 mile limit. That was great so we thought, but we created a monster. That being NOAA. >click to read< Thank You, Sam Parisi 08:52

Process local lobster first, say Val Comeau fishermen after devastating processing plant fire

Steve Ferguson said he wonders what will happen next as they wait to see if the buyer they deal with at Les Pêcheries de Chez-Nous factory will be able to help them out. While a large part of the plant was destroyed in a fire, a portion of the processing plant not damaged is set to resume processing lobster this week with about a third of the staff. The company said 331 people were working at the plant at the time of the fire, and 100 lobster fishermen sold their catch to the plant. Local fishermen want to make sure their catch will take priority over lobster being brought in from Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island.  “At the end of the day, if they can’t produce our lobster from here, why are they bringing so much from other provinces. >click to read< 15:15

Coronavirus: NOAA Cancels Five Large-Scale Fishery Surveys

NOAA announced Friday that it will cancel five out of its six large-scale research surveys in Alaskan waters this year due to COVID-19. The canceled surveys include the Aleutian Islands bottom trawl survey, the eastern Bering Sea bottom trawl survey, the northern Bering Sea bottom trawl survey, the Bering Sea pollock acoustics survey, and the Fall Ecosystem Survey. The Alaska Longline Survey is not affected.  “We determined that there is no way to move forward with a survey plan that effectively minimizes risks to staff, crew, and the communities associated with the surveys. For instance, conducting the key groundfish and crab surveys in a limited timeframe would require extraordinarily long surveys, well beyond standard survey operations,” >click to read< 11:47

After cancellation of the third Copper River period, ADF&G okayed a 12-hour opener on Memorial Day

Light winds, fog and rain spread over Prince William Sound as veteran harvester Bill Webber headed out to sea on the eve of the Memorial Day opener for the famed Copper River wild salmon fishery, hoping perhaps that the third time’s the charm. The third time, that is, because the first opener on May 14, and the second opener on May 18 proved so below the forecast that Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologists halted the anticipated third opener on May 21, then decided on May 22 to go ahead with a third 12-hour opener on Monday, May 25. “The wind isn’t bad, maybe 15 miles an hour, a little foggy, a little rainy,” said Webber, owner of direct-to-consumer Paradigm Seafoods, from the helm of his boat, >click to read< 10:57

Con groups propose total lobster fishing ban

According to the Center for Biological Diversity and several other plaintiff conservation groups, the area “has increasingly become important right whale foraging and socializing habitat in recent years. The conservation groups filed their request last Friday, three weeks after the judge ruled that the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) violated the federal Endangered Species Act when it continued to allow lobster fishing with gear that used fixed vertical buoy lines in which whales could become entangled. As a practical matter, a ban on the vertical lines that connect traps on the sea floor to marker buoys on the surface would amount to a total prohibition against lobster fishing in the area south of the two Massachusetts islands. While scientists at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and a few others have experimented with “ropeless” lobster trap gear (laughter and scorn, erupts from the crowd),,, >click to read< 09:18

Memorial Day: Remembering those that served. Thank You.

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Lars Petter Austnes: Longtime commercial fisherman was known for his big heart, Viking spirit, has passed away

Lars Petter Austnes of Edmonds, Washington passed away on April 29, 2020 at the age of 64. Lars was born October 2, 1955 in Ålesund, Norway, the third child of four to his parents Edvin and Henrikke Austnes. In 1985, he moved to Ballard in Seattle, Washington to work with other Norwegian fishermen in the growing Alaskan Pollock industry in the Bering Sea. Upon arrival, he began his long employment for Glacier Fish Company, owned by the heroic leader and friend, Erik Breivik. He started on the company’s Northern Glacier Catcher/Processor as a Bosun. Lars Lars married Kim Starwich of Ballard October 19, 1991. Lars and Kim have been residents of Edmonds since 1990 and have two daughters, Annika (25) and Kristin (24). He loved and cherished his wife, girls, and dogs dearly. >click to read< 21:20

NPFMC meets online to resolve halibut issues

Federal fisheries managers met online in mid-May to approve emergency action necessitated by the impact of the novel coronavirus,, The session, announced in late April, allowed for harvests, processors and other fishing industry entities until one day in advance of the May 15 meeting to submit written comments through links on the North Pacific Fishery Management Council’s agenda on five emergency requests. Those requests ranged from allowing all holders of individual fishing quota to make temporary transfers of that quota to eligible hired masters during the pandemic to increasing IFQ end-of-year rollover provisions. The council approved the transfer for the rest of the 2020 season for quota shares owned by all halibut and sablefish IFQ holders, based on a request from 11 industry leaders. The council also recommended to the International Pacific Halibut Commission, a request from the halibut charter industry,,,>click to read< 18:34

‘A drink and a good yarn’: Neils Harbour man reveals the secrets to a life well lived, as he turns 100

Ron Ingram of Neils Harbour will celebrate a love of hard work, a life at sea and the occasional ‘nip of rum’ when he celebrates his 100th birthday later this month. It won’t be quite the celebration he’d hoped for. Ingram’s family had planned an open house. Ingram, who still lives on his own, was hoping people could drop by. Those visits from friends are what he misses most during the COVID-19 pandemic. Ingram moved to Neils Harbour, a small fishing village in northern Cape Breton, about 75 years ago. Born and raised in Grand Bruit, N.L., he started fishing when he was nine, according to daughter Kathy MacKinnon. He moved to North Sydney at 18. Newfoundland was part of the British Empire then, he said, and he had no choice but to continue fishing. photos, >click to read< and Happy Birthday, Ron Ingram!

Dramatic footage reveals full extent of damage from massive fire that tore through warehouse on San Francisco’s Fisherman’s Wharf

Dramatic photos have revealed the full extent of damage from a fire that engulfed a warehouse on San Francisco’s Fisherman’s Wharf early Saturday morning. Pictures taken after the blaze was extinguished show the structure destroyed by the fire, with its walls and roof collapsed. The blaze broke out shortly before dawn, sending a thick plume of orange smoke out across San Francisco Bay. Later in the morning, dozens of firefighters were seen surveying the smoldering building as smoke continued to billow across the city. lots of photos, video, >click to read< 13:52