Tag Archives: A day in the life

A Day in the Life of a North Carolina Fisherman

65-year-old Bob McBride greets two helpers before the three steps aboard John 3:16, his 25-foot fiberglass fishing boat. For the next 45 minutes, the fishermen motor east across the Pamlico Sound until they reach an outcropping of wooden stakes rising from the water. The stakes support a series of nets, and McBride navigates his boat into the center. McBride is a pound netter, one of the world’s oldest forms of fishing. Long before Europeans came to the mainland, Native American tribes submerged logs into the Chesapeake Bay to capture Spanish mackerel in their netted maze. For the past 40 years, McBride has followed that same method, as twice a year he sets out a series of nets that form a sort of live aquarium in the Pamlico Sound. >click to read< 13:59

A Day in the Life: Fourth Generation Puget Sound Crabber Whatcom Fisherman Kaegan Gudmundson

Kaegan Gudmundson knows he will soon depart Blaine Harbor on his small commercial crabbing boat Njordor, named after the Norse God. His vessel, at 25 feet, is one of the smaller boats in the fishery. He often operates a one-man crew and never has more than one other person crabbing with him. His boat is built for speed over size, allowing him to quickly travel between his pot locations. Gudmundson’s days start at 4:30 a.m. with coffee and breakfast before heading to the harbor. >click to read< 10:30

A day in the life of a hoki fishing trawler crew

Johnny Thompson was an accountant in Auckland until a snowboarding accident changed his life. “I had it real bad for a start – those first few days were the worst – eventually I came right but everyone takes different amounts of time to get over it.” Thompson is now part of the crew aboard Sealord’s wetfish trawler Otakou , which Stuff joined for a 15-hour expedition for hoki in the Cook Canyon. The day begins at Picton’s Waitohi Wharf at 9am with a five-hour steam to the fishing grounds at the south eastern end of Cook Strait. However, once the vessel hits the open sea it is literally all hands on deck for all 14 crew members. video, >click to read< 17:50

Spend a day in the life of a Florida tuna fisherman

A white scar carved across Carl Roby’s hand tells the story of the time a tuna, a creature he has spent decades harvesting, almost won. It was late. He and his crew were pulling in the miles’ worth of line they strung out earlier that day with hundreds of hooks. It’s methodical work, pulling the line in hand-over-hand and raveling it back onto the spools. The bright spot is when a yellowfin tuna, sleek, strong and worth hundreds, glimmers just under the water. Roby had been fishing for decades at this point. He started as a teenager in the 1970s,,>click to read<21:43

Fisheries scientist takes the spotlight in Fishing Heritage Center’s ‘A Day in the Life’ series

The New Bedford Fishing Heritage Center’s A Day in the Life speaker series continues tonight, March 15, with SMAST fisheries scientist Crista Bank. Beginning at 7 p.m., Bank will share her story and discuss the cooperative research she is currently conducting with the commercial fishing industry. Admission to A Day in the Life is free for Fishing Heritage Center members, and $5 for non-members. The Center is handicap accessible through the parking lot entrance. Free off-street parking available. >click to read<22:33

A day in the life of a New Bedford scallop boat captain

“We’re really pleased to see such a great turnout,” Fishing Heritage Center Director Laura Orleans told the standing-room-only crowd filling the center on Jan. 11. Pleased, but not surprised at the big turnout. “It’s no surprise because Chris Wright is one of my favorite captains,” Orleans said. By the end of the interesting lecture on his life at sea, and a spirited question-and-answer session, Wright was the favorite scallop boat captain of everyone in the room.  “Don’t be in awe of us” braving fierce winds and mountainous waves far offshore, Wright suggested modestly at one point in the question-and-answer period. “It’s just what we do.” What Wright does is skipper the Huntress out of Fairhaven, and the Nordic Pride, based in New Bedford. A shared captain is not uncommon these days, with each scallop boat limited by fishing regulations to a maximum of 75 days at sea, he noted. “I’m getting ready for my 29th year as a captain,” Read the story here 16:32

A day in the life of Alaska’s fishery photographer, Chris Miller

Fishermen pick fish. Pollock gasp for air. A lobster trap rises to the light-filled sea surface like a treasure chest long-hidden. Juneau photographer Chris Miller’s current show, on view through the end of the month at The Rookery Café, is a watery world filled with fish, boats, and the people that make their living from them. “Fishing is kind of my niche,” Miller said. “There’s not a lot of us out there that do it (photograph fisheries) consistently. Every fishery has its own story.” With a background in photojournalism, it’s those stories Miller’s interested in telling. Read the article here  06:53