Tag Archives: Asian carp

‘War on Carp’ – U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell’s message is help is on the way

McConnell said the focus of the interested parties is catching the Asian carp, marketing the fish and reducing the population so they no longer threaten bass fishing and tourism.,,, Marshall County Commissioner Kevin Spraggs, spearheading the Marshall County War on Asian Carp Working Group, said overall the information presented during the hour-long meeting was “very promising.” “I’m very, very encouraged today. We have the right people, the right experts working on it and there’s talk of subsidies to help get more commercial fishermen involved and Senator McConnell is aggressively working on funding,” he said. >click to read<

Army Corps approves $778M plan to block Asian carp advance

The head of the Army Corps of Engineers has sent Congress a $778 million plan to fortify an Illinois waterway with noisemakers, electric cables and other devices in the hope that they will prevent Asian carp from reaching the Great Lakes, where the aggressive invaders could leave other fish with too little to eat. The plan represents a compromise between proposals to erect barriers that would seal off Lake Michigan from the river and less drastic measures such as stepped-up commercial fishing.>click to read<09:14

Luciano: Could Asian carp help a desperate Maine lobster market?

Officials in Illinois and Maine hope to soon announce a breakthrough that in both states could help solve aquatic challenges and boost economics. The news could especially bring a boon to central Illinois. In Illinois, invasive Asian carp choke the Illinois River. In Maine, the lobster industry faces a crisis for a sudden lack of lobster bait. If all goes well, commercial fishers in Illinois soon could be harvesting and shipping tons of Asian carp to Maine. >click to read<

Asian carp lure Chinese investors (and Commercial Fishermen) to Kentucky

Justin Irwin and James Berry took turns to steer their boat on Barkley Lake in western Kentucky, looking for Asian carp.,,, Berry and Irwin, half-brothers originally from Washington, came to Kentucky to fish for Asian carp in November. Irwin is a commercial fisherman who has worked all over the world, most recently in Alaska during the summer. For three months, he worked 20 – to 22-hour days in Alaskan waters.,,, One day, Irwin read an internet article about Asian carp and commercial fishing in Kentucky, and immediately became interested. “As a commercial fisherman, I aim to fish as much as I can,” he said. >click to read<12:42

Canada closer to allowing Asian carp as lobster bait, depending on test outcomes

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency says it is prepared to accept invasive Asian carp from the United States as bait for the lobster industry, provided U.S. authorities can meet a number of conditions including proof the carcasses pose no disease threat. “If the U.S. can meet these requirements, Canada is willing to accept the import of dead, eviscerated silver carp for use as bait,” CFIA spokesperson Brian Naud said in a statement. There is interest in both countries in using Asian carp to supply their respective lobster fisheries which are experiencing a bait shortage as traditional sources decline: herring in the United States and mackerel in Canada. The state of Maine is poised to make a decision on Asian carp as a bait source by the end of May. >click to read<11:34

Spotlight: First Asian carp industrial park in U.S. heralds triumph over invasive fish

The birth of an industrial park devoted to Asian carp processing in the southeastern U.S. state of Kentucky has added to hopes that its prowess in turning the bony fish into delicacy increases the odds of winning the battle against the invasive fish in the Mississippi River. On April 12, the International Fisheries Industrial Park, sitting on 64 acres of wooded land in Wickliffe City, Ballard County, came online. With the newly arrived Chinese makers of fish ball, smoked fish, dried fish, fish sauce and a manufacturer who turns fish guts into organic fertilizers, the industrial park achieves vertical processing integration and is waste-free. (a possible new lobster bait source!) >click to read<13:59

Canada says no to Asian carp as lobster bait

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency is throwing cold water on the prospect of importing Asian carp from the United States for use as lobster bait.
With bait prices on the rise, the invasive species was promoted as a cheaper bait source for the lucrative fishery. “The CFIA is aware that the industry has expressed interest in importing Asian carp for bait for the lobster fishery,” agency spokesperson Christine Carnaffan said in an email. The position is news to promoter Patrick Swim of lobster.ca, who said he has spent months seeking permits from both countries to import Asian carp from the Illinois River as bait for the lobster fishery in southwest Nova Scotia and Maine. >click to read<08:46

Federal help potentially coming to help fight the War On Carp

The war on Asian Carp is nowhere close to being over. Lyon County Judge Executive Wade White just returned from Washington D.C. and says help could be on its way. During that trip, White requested 12 million dollars in funding. White says that money will go toward Asian Carp barriers at nine different hot spots on the lake, subsidies for fisherman, and research on carp control methods. Also in the works – a change to fishing restrictions that would allow commercial fisherman to fish on the weekends to help catch more Asian Carp. Current regulations restrict them from doing that. >click to read<11:31

Lyon County Judge Executive Pushing To Expand Local Asian Carp Fishing

The Kentucky Fish & Wildlife Commission will meet Friday morning to consider whether to allow weekend commercial fishing of Asian carp on Kentucky Lake and Lake Barkley, and the Lyon County judge executive is making a push for its approval. Commercial fishing of Asian carp on the two lakes is currently only allowed on weekdays during summer months, April to September, because of past concern that recreational boats might get caught in fishing nets. >click to read<08:57

Lake Huron – Thriving family fishery spans 2 centuries, 5 generations

Tim Purdy gets a little emotional when he talks about his son Josiah becoming the fifth generation to work at the family fishery in Point Edward. “It’s good to see your kids want to be involved,” Purdy says. Though proud his son is part of a thriving business that’s operated for nearly 120 years, he’s worried too. “We’re trying to figure out how to stop the Asian carp,”,,, >click to read< 18:07

Illinois to Michigan: Put your money where the carp is

Gov. Bruce Rauner said today that Illinois is happy to accept $8 million from the State of Michigan to put toward the fight to keep Asian carp out of the Great Lakes — provided the funds can be used now to advance the effort. Unfortunately, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder’s current offer of financial assistance isn’t applicable until 2028. Rauner sent a letter today to Snyder with a counterproposal to continue the fight against Asian carp. The Illinois governor said the best way to reduce the risk of Asian carp invasion is to enhance commercial fishing strategies in the Upper Illinois River and the Alton, LaGrange and Peoria pools today. >click to read<12:37

‘Carp cowboys’ round up invasive Asian carp as Illinois, federal officials debate costly measures to protect Lake Michigan

In Illinois, current strategies have successfully reduced the leading edge of the Asian carp population by 93 percent since 2012, according to sonar scans. By removing more than 1 million pounds of carp annually in the past several years, the state has contained the adult population to the Dresden Island Pool, 47 miles away from Lake Michigan, near Minooka, Ill. But computer modeling suggests it’s not enough. To repel Asian carp, about four times that amount needs to be removed from downstream.,, On Tuesday, near the banks of Sheehan Island where Asian carp like to take refuge, state-contracted fisherman Shawn Price gunned the engine of his boat while his father hit a wooden stick on the side. Minutes later, Shawn Price began pulling in nets chock-full of Asian carp. >click to read<09:01

Pricetag of Asian Carp Defense Project Climbs to $778 Million

The forecasted pricetag of a planned Asian carp defense system near Joliet, Illinois that would hopefully prevent the invasive species from infiltrating the Great Lakes has now climbed to $778 million, up from an initial estimate of $275 million, according to an update last week from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. As reported by the Detroit News, the project, which would be finished sometime between 2025 and 2027, will now be reviewed by state and federal agencies. If Congress funds the initiative, an electric barrier would be installed as well as underground speakers to essentially blast noise at fish to stop them in their tracks northbound. >click to read<12:12

Eating the Most Hated Fish on the Mississippi

The presence of silver carp in the Mississippi dates back to the 1960s, when scientists in Arkansas brought a few different species of Asian carp into the country to see if they might offer a chemical-free way to clean algae out of fish ponds. When funding for the experiment dried up, the fish were released to the waterways and swiftly began outcompeting local fish. Today Asian carp—mostly bighead, silver, and grass carp—make up 90 percent of the biomass in parts of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers.,, One of the biggest challenges for Fin, Schafer, and Two Rivers is finding enough fishermen. Commercial river fishing is a dwindling industry along many parts of the Mississippi and Ohio,,, >click to read<14:46

Kentucky Awards First-Ever Fish House Contract to Fight Asian Carp

Gov. Matt Bevin today announced the award of the state’s first-ever fish house contract, in an innovative step to attack the Asian carp problem in western Kentucky and encourage job growth in the region..,, The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is pledging up to $4 million in loans and incentives for the fish house and commercial fishermen.,, “Commercial anglers currently harvest two million pounds of Asian carp from Kentucky’s waters each year,” said Ron Brooks, Kentucky Fish and Wildlife’s fisheries director. “We believe this program can increase that catch to 20 million pounds across the state within the next five years.” >click to read<13:13 

Canadian fishermen want cheaper lobster bait. Americans want to stop an invasive fish. And so, one man hatches a plan

Like whales breaching ocean swells, silver carp fly out from beneath the surface of waterways in Illinois. Tens of millions of dollars have been spent trying to keep the invasive fish – which procreate rapidly, crowding out other marine life – from spilling into the $7-billion Great Lakes fishery. And in an era of expeditious information-sharing, the “flying fish,” a form of Asian carp imported into the States decades ago, with hopes of using them to manage American ecosystems, have also caught the attention of gawking social-media spectators around the world. Three years ago, one of those spectators was a Nova Scotian named Patrick J. Swim. But instead of merely gawking, the self-described “lobsterpreneur” hatched a plan: >click to read<12:32

As Asian Carp Invade Tennessee, State Asks Fishermen To Help Fight Back

The scale of the asian carp problem has gotten considerably worse in recent years as the invasive species moves further into Tennessee. The state Wildlife Resources Agency is developing a plan to keep the carp contained and eventually push them back. The agency is working with other states and the federal government to sponsor fishing tournaments, create incentives for commercial fishermen and test out new technology to keep the carp from spreading out of West Tennessee. The agency is funding a $500 thousand program to develop new markets for the carp beyond fertilizer, like getting more of them into restaurants. >click to read<15:26

Carp Conundrum: Too Many Fish, Not Enough Fishermen

Two Rivers Fisheries in west Kentucky has more than doubled its Asian carp processing since it opened in 2013. Employees at the Wickliffe fishery are working on a load of silver carp caught by contracted commercial fishermen. The crates of fish represent a small amount of the more two million pounds that Two Rivers processes. “We need at least 10 groups of full-time commercial fishermen, ”,,,  “I’ve got fishermen here that are making $2,000 to $3,000 a week… We are trying to get people to start fishing for this fish because this fish is here to stay and we are here to stay.” >click to read<16:22

Chinese business brings prosperity to fishermen on Mississippi

After less than 10-minute cruising on the Mississippi River in west Kentucky, Mark Buttler stopped his boat near a shoal and began to cast nets. He harvested 400 pounds of fish from two fishnets on this bright autumn morning. For the 62-year-old fisherman, who joined his father for fishing soon after high school graduation in the westernmost part of the U.S. state of Kentucky, the daily routine also includes selling his catch to a local business run by a Chinese entrepreneur. Before 2013, he sold his fish either to a market up north or to a seafood restaurant in Ledbetter, Kentucky. Then Angie Yu came to the City of Wickliffe in west Kentucky and opened the Two Rivers Fisheries to process fish from the Mississippi. Yu’s efforts also coincide with the U.S. government’s eagerness to remove some of the Asian carp from the river. click here to read the story 17:53

Kentucky State Fish and Wildlife Department seeking input on entrepreneurial solutions for Asian carp problem

Asian carp swim by the millions in Kentucky’s waterways, threatening to crowd out native fish in some of the state’s most cherished fishing destinations – including Kentucky and Barkley lakes in the west. With an absence of predators and little natural controls available for these invasive species, the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, the state Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet and the Commonwealth of Kentucky are seeking public input on a plan to limit the explosive growth of Asian carp populations while providing a valuable protein source for people. State officials will evaluate a potential public/private partnership to boost the emerging Asian carp fish processing business in Kentucky. State support of entrepreneurs could include hiring commercial anglers and rental of necessary equipment; supplying freezer space in warehouses; purchasing catches during low demand times; and cash incentives, among other potential solutions. click here to read the story 08:30

Progress made on invasive Asian carp in Kentucky thanks to Commercial Fishermen

Asian carp have been a big problem in our state. For years now, the KDFWR has worked with commercial fisherman, private fish processors and others in efforts to remove the Asian carp from our waters. Since 2015, three processors have been established, and their facilities have led to the harvest of more than 1.2 million pounds of Asian carp in 2015; more than 800,000 pounds from Kentucky and Barkley lakes. These processors are putting a big dent into this large population and are taking a fish that is unwanted in our waterways and putting them to use by processing them into food to ship overseas. In March, Two Rivers Fisheries in Wickliffe announced it was expanding. The plant doubled production in the past year, processing more than four million Asian carp to ship the fillets overseas and to use in fertilizers. click here to read the story 10:32

REWARD!! Michigan DNR Offers Big Reward For Plan To Block Invasive Fish

If the fishing world had a most-wanted list, Asian carp surely top it. There are plenty of despised invasives plaguing U.S. waters, but how many of them have a $1 million dollar bounty on their heads? That’s what the Michigan Department of Natural Resources just dropped on the table. Show the agency a viable plan for stopping those silver and big head carp from reaching the Great Lakes and you could be eligible for a sweet payday. In case you haven’t already heard the tale, Asian carp are prolific breeders that can reach 50-pounds. The filter-feeding invasives consume massive amounts of the tiny plants (phytoplankton) and animals (zooplankton) that feed native forage species, along with juvenile sport fish such as walleye and yellow perch. Disrupting the food web can wreak havoc on local fisheries. Read the story here with link to DNR 12:21

What a surprise! Fishermen can catch grass carp, but government scientists can’t!

Despite Quebec’s investment of $1.7 million to tackle a possible grass carp invasion, scientists have yet to locate any specimens themselves. Quebec’s Forests, Wildlife and Parks Ministry was quick to roll out a plan to combat the invasive species after two fishermen in the Lanaudière region caught a 29-kilogram grass carp in the St. Lawrence River May 27. Government scientists’ subsequent fishing expeditions have taken place in the Contrecœur area, about 60 kilometres northeast of Montreal. Tuesday, the ministry announced they have come up empty-handed. At this stage, laboratory tests are underway to determine the presence of grass carp DNA in the St. Lawrence River, sampling water from different areas. Those results will be available at the beginning of July. The grass carp is a type of Asian carp. The one that was caught in the St. Lawrence River was estimated to be between 15 and 30 years old. link 10:17

Asian carp in the St-Lawrence threatens Quebec’s fishing industry

asian carpIf you’ve seen the videos of boaters laughing uproariously as their motors startle giant Asian carp that leap high in the air and even into their boats, you might think it’s fun news that a 29-kilogram Asian carp was recently fished out of the St-Lawrence River. It’s not. The discovery of a single grass carp, one of four Asian carp species that have invaded several waterways in the United States in recent decades, near Contrecoeur last month could spell disaster for other fish, waterfowl and various species in the St-Lawrence River, and the waterways connected to it, as well as Quebec’s fishing industry. Here is a primer on Asian carp and why they’re so worrisome. Read the rest here 20:43

Commercial fisherman pulls a grass carp from his net in Lake Erie

On Thursday, September 17, 2015 a commercial fisherman had an interesting find when he pulled a grass carp from his net in Lake Erie .The Grass carp is a species of the Asian carp, which feeds on aquatic vegetation. The fish was caught west of Point Pelee Thursday morning and weighed in at about 23 pounds (10.5 kilograms), though they have been known to grow upwards of 99 pounds (45 kilograms). The carp was sent to the Department of Fisheries and Oceans in Burlington for testing. This specific testing will include whether the fish was fertile or sterile,,, Read the rest here 12:22

SECURE THE BOARDER! Asian carp discovery in Toronto prompts swift response

Canadian officials have moved quickly after an invasive species of fish was spotted in ponds in Toronto. It’s one of the largest responses ever against Asian carp. “We’re seeing an invasion happening in the U.S., so we can see the devastation that these species are having. We’re seeing native species pushed out for food and space, we’re seeing loss of habitat in wetlands areas and we’re seeing declines in commercial fishery values,” said Becky Cudmore, manager of the Asian Carp program. “Those are the type of impacts that these Asian carp species are,,, Read the rest here 14:03

To tame the invasive Asian Carp, local chef pitches processing plant

Plopping a 25-pound Asian carp in all its glorious ugliness onto a table in the middle of a conference room is a sure-fire way to get an audience’s attention. For Chef Philippe Parola it is the start of a familiar pitch: find a way to facilitate the consumption of the invasive species before it wrecks freshwater ecosystems in Louisiana, much as it already has in the upper Mississippi River valley. Read the rest here 07:55

Emerging Fishery: Asian Carp nuisance seen as growth industry

“The best way to control anything is to eat it up,” said Luu at her company in Ledbetter, on the outskirts of Paducah. “This is the second most consumed species of fish in the world. As a result, we can save our other species of fish.” Her company markets the carp as “Kentucky Blue Snapper,”,. She hopes to create 60 jobs paying about $10 an hour after receiving state approval last month to receive up to $1 million in state tax incentives. Another $4 million in similar state aid has been approved for two other nearby carp processors since 2013. Read the rest here 11:25

Asian carp chili or carp burgers, anyone?

Although Asian carp filets are too bony for most U.S. consumers, boneless minced carp can be used as healthy stand-in for ground beef in some recipes. A recent University of Missouri blind taste test found that Asian carp rated higher than catfish. Asian carp chili, anyone?  It may not sound appealing at first, but Dr. Mark Morgan at the University of Missouri has received rave reviews for his unique chili on several occasions.  Read the rest here 17:17

Illinois company latest to test market for carp

When they arrive at the processing plant, the fish that have been cursed as a menace to American lakes and rivers are raked onto a conveyer belt, some of them still flopping.  Brought by the boatload to this facility north of St. Louis, the Asian carp quickly meet a gruesome fate: They are ground to a bloody pulp in a maze of machines that churn their bony bodies into dehydrated meal and fish oil. Read more here 20:22