Tag Archives: Butterfish

Ocean blob brings tropical fish to B.C. coast

Something unusual is happening off the coast of British Columbia. Fish species normally found in the warm waters of the tropics are finding their way north — and a blob is being blamed. Ian Perry, a research scientist with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans based on Vancouver Island, says butterfish, tope sharks, ocean sunfish, even a finescale triggerfish have all been spotted further north than usual. Perry says it’s not uncommon for some of these fish to find their way northward every five to 10 years, whenever there’s an El Nino, a massive patch of warm water that appears in the Equatorial Pacific every few years. Read the rest here 09:51

Fishermen can catch more butterfish; Rhode Island lands half of the catch + video

seafreeze vesselsFederal fishing regulators say fishermen can catch more butterfish in 2015 because the condition of the fish stock is improving. National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration officials say they are increasing the butterfish quota from 3,200 metric tons in 2014 to 22,530 metric tons in 2015. Fishermen caught 1,333 metric tons of butterfish up and down the East Coast in 2013, the most recent year for which federal statistics are available. Rhode Island had the largest fishery in the country, with more than 700 metric tons. Video, read the rest here 13:03

Butterfish: In search of a lost market

seafreeze vesselsFrom the late 1970s through the ’80s, the small, silver-colored butterfish was a high-flying commodity in Japan. Millions upon millions of pounds were bought and sold, and almost the entire harvest came off Rhode Island vessels. But as often happens with boom cycles, this one was followed by a bust,,, “There is no way we’re going to just flip a switch with this and be back in boom time,” said Glenn Goodwin, co-owner of SeaFreeze Ltd., a Rhode Island frozen seafood company based in North Kingstown and the Narragansett fishing village of Galilee. Read the rest here 09:53

Butterfish—Little Fish Big Science

For this assessment, scientists developed a new method for estimating fish abundance that takes changing environmental conditions into account, something that will become increasingly important as the climate changes and the oceans warm.,,, Much of that uncertainty was caused by the fact that butterfish shift their distribution in response to changing bottom water temperatures.,, The breakthrough came when scientists devised a way to account for the effect of bottom water temperature,,, Read the rest here 11:09

NOAA Announces Partial Approval of Amendment 14 to the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan

nmfs_logoOn November 7, 2013, NOAA – National Marine Fisheries Service, on behalf of the Secretary of Commerce, partially approved Amendment 14 to the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid and Butterfish Fishery Management Plan. For the rundown, click here 21:24