Tag Archives: CETA

Clearwater Seafoods buys Scottish crabber as part of bid to expand in Europe

Seafood giant Clearwater Seafoods is beefing up its presence in Europe by buying a crab fishing boat and licence and is casting its eye on other potential acquisitions. The Bedford-based company picked up the Heather K., a Scottish crabber, in July for an undisclosed amount. “It was nominal (amount) relative to our total capital expenditures,” Ian Smith, chief executive officer of Clearwater Seafoods, said Thursday during the company’s second-quarter earnings call. “What is important about that is that it was the beginning of our vertical integration in Scotland.” In late 2015, Clearwater Seafoods bought all of the shares of Scotland’s MacDuff Shellfish Group Ltd. for £94.4 million.(photo, shipspotter.com) click here to read the story 11:59

CETA – Canada-European Union pact worries US lobster industry

Members of the U.S. seafood industry are fearful that Canada’s approval of a new trade deal with the European Union will cause big problems for the American lobster business, just as the catch is hitting historic highs. The Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement Implementation Act, or CETA, cleared its final hurdle in the Parliament of Canada on Tuesday. The deal gets rid of tariffs on Canadian lobster exports to the 28-nation bloc, putting Canada at a huge advantage over the U.S.,,, Seafood exporters and lobster industry members like Dave Madden, owner of exporter Lobster Trap in Bourne, Massachusetts, said they fear loss of money and jobs in the U.S. under the new rules. He ships about 4.5 million pounds of lobsters to countries such as Italy, France and Spain per year. click here to read the story 19:27

CETA Deal could be in force for opening day of lobster season on P.E.I.

Canada’s free trade deal with Europe is only steps away from being ratified in Ottawa, and the Lobster Council of Canada is telling exporters to get ready. When CETA is passed an eight per cent tariffs on live lobster shipped to Europe will immediately disappear, and could happen as soon as May 1, the day the spring lobster season on P.E.I. opens. Lobster industry officials in Maine are worried that the disappearance of those tariffs, while tariffs on U.S. lobster remain, could eat into their exports. “For the lobster sector it will mean tariff free access to 27 countries in Europe over the next number of years,” said Geoff Irvine, executive director of the Lobster Council of Canada. Read the rest here 12:32

CETA: Liberals’ passivity a detriment to our fishery

The Comprehensive Economic Trade Agreement (CETA) was approved with Premier Dwight Ball and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau in office. So, what was negotiated to transition our fishing industry to a more competitive, technologically advanced, scientific and market-driven industry? Apparently, according to Premier Ball, nothing! An area of provincial jurisdiction was relinquished to Ottawa to use in their negotiations with the EU, with only silence from the Ball Liberals for the past 15 months, despite a signed letter from Trudeau promising that this province would be given a $400-million fisheries investment fund as a condition of giving up minimum processing requirements (MPRs). There was no mention of an “Atlantic” fisheries fund in his letter.In 2014, Trudeau wrote: “your government’s support of the CETA was earned, in part, by a promise from the Government of Canada to help the industry adjust to the new reality. That promise should be honoured.” He referred specifically to the $400-million fund for Newfoundland and Labrador. Premier Ball was not able to deliver on that written commitment. continue reading the op-ed here 10:18

Gov. Paul LePage: US should take on EU-Canada lobster tariff plan

Maine’s governor says the U.S. should challenge a European Union plan to lift tariffs on Canadian lobster. Gov. Paul LePage, a Republican, says the tariff deal would put Maine lobsters at a “significant disadvantage” to Canada. He made the comments during an appearance on WVOM-FM on Tuesday. American lobster wholesalers and retailers are concerned about the possibility of a tariff change, in part because the exchange rate already favors Canada. The EU imported more than $150 million in lobster from the U.S. last year. LePage says it’s time to go to Washington and “instill in them how serious this is.” He says he intends to use his connections with the Trump administration to push the issue. Link 09:17

Trade Deals: Maine Lobster industry fears lost sales from ramped-up Canadian exports

A new trade deal looming between Canada and the European Union is setting off alarm bells in the Maine lobster industry. The deal between Canada and the EU – the largest seafood consumer market in the world – would eliminate tariffs on Canadian lobster exports into Europe and give the Maritimes a competitive advantage over their American counterparts, who would be stuck selling lobsters with tariffs ranging from 8 percent for a live lobster to 20 percent on processed or cooked lobster. A weak Canadian dollar, which is now valued at about 75 percent of a U.S. dollar, will only make Canadian lobster that much more attractive to importers in the 28 member nations of the European Union, which is the second biggest importer of American lobsters, second only to Canada, according to trade data. In 2016, the EU imported $152 million worth of lobsters from the U.S., most of it from Maine. continue reading the story here 08:07

Fishery fund ‘biggest sellout’: Paul Davis says Ball government gave up $300M

The Progressive Conservatives are calling an Atlantic fisheries fund that will direct $100-million to Newfoundland and Labrador a sellout. “It’s the biggest sellout in the history of the fishery,” said Opposition Leader Paul Davis who went on the attack in question period in the House of Assembly Tuesday. “This is nothing but a sellout to the federal government.” Davis complained that, in the fund announced Friday, the province settled for a fraction of what was contemplated under a trade agreement between Canada and Europe [CETA]. That $400-million dollar fund would have included $280 million from Ottawa, with the rest coming from the province. The money was demanded by the province as the CETA took shape in 2013 to compensate for giving up minimum processing requirements. read the story here 20:00

Fund compensating Newfoundland seafood industry could resolve one of the final obstacles to CETA deal

With the United States poised to adopt a more protectionist trade policy under President-Elect Donald Trump, some good news for supporters of Canada’s major trade deal with the European Union could come this week. A decision is expected soon on compensation for businesses in Newfoundland and Labrador that would lose out due to provisions in the recently-signed Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) — one of the last potential causes of a hold-up on the Canadian side of the deal. A Liberal source said Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has been discussing a special fisheries fund with Premier Dwight Ball and an announcement could come as soon as later this week. Read the rest here 19:31

CETA is OVER: Belgian PM kills trade deal in devastating blow to EU

Charles Michel said after a meeting with regional leaders: “I have officially told Tusk that we have no agreement.” The EU had given Belgium until Monday to overcome opposition to the CETA trade deal from its French-speaking south before it would likely have to cancel a Thursday summit with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to sign the pact. Mr Michel said he was still open to dialogue with the main holdout, the region of Wallonia, and that it was too early to say whether CETA was dead.EU and Canadian leaders have said they are keen to conclude the deal after years of negotiation. Mr Michel could not provide the consent of Belgium to that of the other 27 EU member states without backing from five regional authorities. Read the rest here 11:11

FFAW president hopes Canada-EU trade talks aren’t finished

ffaw lifo quotaThe head of Newfoundland and Labrador’s largest private-sector union said he’s disappointed that Canada-EU trade talks have fallen apart. “It’s preliminary, but it doesn’t certainly look good for (the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement) in its current form right now,” Keith Sullivan, president of the Fish, Food and Allied Workers union told CBC on Friday. International Trade Minister Chrystia Freeland walked out of talks Friday with the regional government of Wallonia, which has been blocking the deal, due to be signed next week. Sullivan told CBC the deal as it stood was a “mixed bag” for Canadian workers, but he thought there was potential benefit for the fishing industry. “There was certainly an area where people saw some opportunities where they could get decreased tariffs on some products like shrimp and crab, and that was an opportunity for some people,” he said. “So it was certainly mixed, but it might be all for nothing now.” Read the rest here 12:09

CETA on life support because of Brexit

ca_eu_ceta1-1The Brexit vote has left Europe in a mess – and dealt a serious blow to Canada’s trade prospects. (CETA, Canadian fishery issues, click here) The British pound is dropping, world markets are scrambling and most are wondering how the political establishment will address what appears to be a constitutional vacuum related to exiting member-states of the European Union. It speaks to how ill-prepared the union was to such an eventuality. Yet the biggest casualty of Brexit will likely be global trading. And Canada may pay a huge price, since our Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) with the EU is still under negotiation and won’t be ratified any time soon. And with so much uncertainty in agricultural policies particularly, CETA is undoubtedly on life support, at best. CETA emphasizes Canada’s relationship with the EU and was Canada’s greatest chance to become a significant portal between both continents. The United Kingdom is one of our top food trading partners within the EU and there was great potential to further increase trade in certain commodities.  Read the rest here 13:55

CETA breakthrough revives discussion over contentious fisheries renewal fund

Newfoundland and Labrador’s representative in the federal cabinet says talks are underway about how the province might be compensated for losses incurred once a Canada-European Union trade deal is implemented. Public Services and Procurement Minister Judy Foote was in St. John’s Monday to speak to a business audience, but fisheries issues garnered most of the attention when she met later with reporters. The federal government announced Monday that a legal review of the English text of the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) is now complete. Read the rest here 08:43

CETA negotiations suspended over fisheries fund, N.L. says

863a4ac9dc_64635696_o2Newfoundland and Labrador is and all trade agreements currently being negotiated with the federal government. Newfoundland and Labrador says the federal government is not honouring a prior commitment to set up the fund, which it says will be needed to help the seafood industry when a trade deal with the European Union is approved.  Read the rest here 12:18

“Snappy Dresser” Peter MacKay says $280M CETA fisheries fund never meant to be ‘slush fund’

Ottawa and the provincial government have been at odds over the interpretation of the $280-million fisheries fund for , with the province claiming the federal government has put new stipulations on the deal. Read the rest here 20:25

BAKER – CETA: Political showdown or tempest in a teapot?

mza_1601165783653993600_255x255-75The continuing ruckus around the is feeling a little bit like a Twilight Zone episode: What is real? What isn’t? Why did this suddenly become an issue? Who promised what? And who was the man in the red hat? All good questions. Well, mostly. Read the rest here 16:31

Trade agreement sparks Canadian interest in Grimsby, the UK gateway to seafood retailing

Grimsby played host to a strong delegation from Canada’s fishing fraternity, with companies with a combined turnover of £500 million travelling up from London to take in the award-winning cluster and meet with businesses keen to receive their exports. Read the rest here 09:23

CETA Relevance to NL Inshore/Coastal Communities – Winston Fiander

863a4ac9dc_64635696_o2Newfoundland and Labrador are blessed with some 40,000 kilometers of coastline which has hundreds of communities situated adjacent to some of the richest fishing grounds in the world. Read [email protected]  11:08

There is some market for cod on the south coast, after months with none – The Fisheries Broadcast

Did the Europeans ask Canada to relax restrictions around ownership of harvesting licences as part of CETA? [email protected]  16:04

Why the Snub? CETA tour takes feds to all provinces, except N.L.

863a4ac9dc_64635696_o2The absence of this province from the cross country tour comes after a similar absence during a major press conference on Oct. 29 announcing a $400 million federal-provincial fisheries fund. The federal government is contributing $280 million to that fund, but not a single federal MP, senator or bureaucrat attended the event held at the Rooms in St. John’s.  [email protected]  20:51

Brussels-based (CETA) memo contradicts Canadian statements – says N.L. fish will help European processors

863a4ac9dc_64635696_o2“I have to talk to both Canadian and European trade people (about this),” Simms told The Fisheries Broadcast, adding that his next question is, “To what extent do processors in the European Union want the raw material from the Newfoundland and Labrador coast to feed their plants?” THEY WANT IT ALL!! [email protected]  14:31

The discussion on CETA and the $400 million fisheries fund is hitting on a recurring question: is there enough information out there about the proposed plans? We’ll look at how the debate is shaping up politically, from the viewpoint of three very different participants. Listen, thefisherybroadcast

Free trade deal could open ports to rogue fishing vessels – CETA may grant EU vessels ‘most-favoured’ status for Canadian port access

There are concerns that CETA, the proposed free trade agreement between Canada and Europe, could make it more difficult for Canada to restrict access to its ports for European vessels, including those cited for fishing infractions outside the 200-mile limit, CBC News has learned. [email protected]  07:46