Tag Archives: Department of Primary Industries

Black market lobsters cost man $94k

A WA man has been fined and banned from lobster fishing for two years after selling hundreds of rock lobsters on the black market. Graham Thomas Davies from Yanchep has been ordered to pay a fine and costs of $94,409.35 after pleading guilty to multiple charges following an investigation by the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development Fisheries. “This outcome highlights how serious the court considers these offences,“ compliance manager Todd A’Vard said on Wednesday. The department says Davies sold more than 300 rock lobsters he had caught recreationally between November 2015 and March 2016. click here to read the story 12:51

Catch Shares – Fishing Family Devastated by NSW Government Fishery Reforms

nsw-catch-share-reformsTears come to Donna Cook’s eyes as she describes the sale of her and her husband’s family fishing business; forced, they say, by the impact of the NSW Government’s fishing reforms. After five generations spanning more than 100 years of working the Macleay, the Cook family sold their Stuarts Point fishing business earlier this year to an investor. “We’ve always been a successful fishing family, we’ve bought a home and raised five kids,” Donna told the Argus. “But we lost 60 per cent of our income from the reforms. “We just couldn’t go on.”  The State Government reasons that the reform will ensure economic viability and environmental sustainability for the sector. But Donna said the changes have crippled fishers from around the State, with many forced to sell out to wealthy investors and large scale fishing operations. Catch Shares! Read the story here 09:42

Williamtown toxic truth: Hunter River fishing bans lifted

The Hunter’s prawn trawlers went back to work this week for the first time since agreeing to an indefinite ban on working the Hunter River in November last year. The ban – dubbed a gentleman’s agreement – came as a result of contamination from the Williamtown RAAF Base. It followed state government bans on fishing in Fullerton Cove and the upper Tilligerry Creek, and was seen as necessary to protect the region’s seafood reputation. Then in October this year, to the surprise of a lot of fishers, the bans were lifted. The Department of Primary Industries issued a statement saying the public could “be confident that seafood for sale is safe to eat”, and the Newcastle Fishing Cooperative began accepting local produce again. “We were shocked,” Hewitt says on his trawler, named Junior. “We turned up to that meeting thinking, you know, they were going tell us whether or not they would buy our boats off us.  “Then the first thing the DPI guy said was ‘full opening of the river from this date’.  “Everyone just stayed quiet. It was unreal. Even all the crazy fishermen who I thought would abuse them just said nothing.” Nice photo gallery, Read the rest here 19:50

Commercial fishers ‘gutted’ by govt reforms

b88236129z1_20160727153715_000gjg8g9l12-0-r7llj547930vq8h9mm2_t620Commercial fishers gathered in Coffs Harbour from across the state in protest against fisheries reforms. More than 80 fishermen from Hawkesbury River to as far north as the Tweed rallied at the Jetty foreshores on Tuesday and Wednesday to garner public support to fight the reforms. Fishermen like Allan Bodycote, of the Clarence Valley, say the State Government’s Commercial Fisheries Business Adjustment Program will cripple their businesses because they will need to buy back their right to continue their current catch quotas. “We’ve got active fishers here who have been actively fishing up to 35 years in the game and come 2017, we believe we won’t have access to the shares to continue fishing because there is not enough shares to go around,” Mr Bodycote said. “We are buying our jobs back, how many times do you have to buy your job?” Read the rest here 17:04

Commercial fishermen create new peak body to fight fisheries reform in New South Wales

nsw fisheries reforms“It’s a group of fisherman, associations, pretty much anyone that draws their income out of the fishing industry. For a long time, there has been a need for the industry to have a voice,”  Paul Sullivan said. “All the commercial fishermen, their backs are up against the wall. “We could lose our jobs, we could lose our houses. The pressure that we’ve had over the last 12 months is insane. “We were 4,000 fishermen strong. “We’re down to 1,100 now and this latest reform that the government wants to put through, they want to take another 500 out of the industry, which will just be devastating to the industry and infrastructure around the industry.” Read the rest here 07:30