Tag Archives: dumping day

The hidden danger of Dumping Day in Nova Scotia

On Dumping Day, the hundreds of fishing boats that hit the water at the start of lobster season to set their traps can act as camouflage for a vessel in distress and hinder search and rescue efforts. In 2015, that camouflage led search and rescue technicians to jump out of a plane and miss a boat that needed their help, according to the Transportation Safety Board (TSB). Back on Nov. 30, 2015, the Royal Canadian Air Force’s Joint Rescue Coordination Centre dispatched a Hercules plane and Cormorant helicopter after two boats ran into trouble off Nova Scotia’s southwestern shore. The Cormorant and its crew managed to rescue two men who had fallen overboard from one vessel. In his report, Morrow determined that if rescue crews can’t accurately identify a vessel in distress from above, critical search and rescue operations may be delayed. Read the story here 09:08

‘Dumping Day’ docked by blustery forecasts in effort to make lobster hunt safer

Safety is of the utmost importance to today’s lobster fishers. And safety holds special significance for old-timers to whom the precautionary measures are a mournful reminder of sailors who paid the ultimate price in pursuit of Canada’s most valuable sea-dwelling commodity. “We try to make Dumping Day safe as we can,” says longtime lobsterman Ashton Spinney. “Still, there’s danger … Unforeseen accidents happen. “Spinney is a member of the body that oversees Lobster Fishing Area 34 (LFA 34) in southwestern Nova Scotia — an approximately New Jersey-sized body of water that has the largest catches of Canada’s 41 lobster fishing districts. Canada’s billion-dollar lobster business remains the most lucrative fishery the country and a crucial economic engine on the East Coast, employing about 30,000 harvesters in the Atlantic provinces. Spinney, who is coming up on his 60th Dumping Day, says in his early years, fishers would set out to sea in up to 130 kilometre per hour winds, restricted only by time and nautical nerve. He says the rules have since changed to only allow boats to set sail if the weather permits safe travel. Contingencies like this have likely spared lives in recent years, Spinney says, but still today, every angler risks life and limb upon exiting the harbour. – Read the rest here 11:21

Dumping Day Update: Weather delays opening

American-lobsterForecast rain, snow and wind have delayed the opening of the lobster season in southwest Nova Scotia. A decision was made midday Saturday not to go ahead with Monday’s “dumping day” in lobster fishing Areas 33 and 34. Officials will decide on Sunday morning whether Tuesday should be dumping day. Environment Canada has issued a special weather statement for Halifax, Lunenburg and Queens counties because of a low pressure system that’s expected to bring rain and snow over the weekend. Boats piled high with lobster traps in area 34 were to leave the wharves at 6 a.m. Monday and at 7 a.m. Monday in area 33. The province is reminding people who make their living on the water to be safe. Read the rest here 13:35

Under a full compliment of resources, lobster fisherman are optimistic for repeat of last season

b97632166z-120161121180103000g5off86a-11Wharves all along the south shore are piled high with lobster fishing gear and boats are at the ready for dumping day and the start of the commercial lobster fishery on Monday, Nov. 28 in Lobster Fishing Areas (LFA) 33 and 34. As always, Mother Nature has the final call when the season starts. If it’s fair winds and seas, boats in LFA 34 will leave the wharves at 6 a.m. and in LFA 33, at 7 a.m. A full compliment of resources will be on standby on the water and in the air for the season start, said Sean Arbour, search and recue coordinator at the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre (JRCC) in Halifax. “The three lifeboat stations at West Port, Clark’s Harbour and Sambro will have the cutters on the water in position about 20 to 30 miles out on stand-by,” said Arbour. “Offshore we will have two large vessels on-site tasked to search and rescue. Typically, one is stationed off Yarmouth and the other one stationed off Liverpool about two hours off.” Read the rest here 18:20

3 Fishermen pulled from water after falling overboard on first day of lobster season

hi-cormorant-heli-cp-567961-8colThree people were pulled from the water after they went overboard from two boats southwest of Yarmouth for a freezing and dangerous start to the lobster season. Joint Rescue Co-ordination Centre spokesman navy Lt. Len Hickey said two workers went overboard from one boat, plus one from a different boat, about 30 nautical miles southwest of Yarmouth. He did not know the time of the incidents, but it’s believed to be between 9 and 10 a.m. Read the article here 14:19

Claws out: Race for best spots kicks off lobster season in Nova Scotia

lobsterBefore the crack of dawn Monday, Hubert Saulnier and nearly 5,000 other lobster fishermen prepare for the most hectic and lucrative day of their season. “Dumping Day” in Southern Nova Scotia falls on the last Monday in November, where 1,500 fishing boats depart at the same time, usually 6:00 a.m., to let out their lobster traps for the year. “It’s the worst day of the season,” said Saulnier, captain of the Lindy Dawn and 46-year veteran of Dumping Day. “In the winter it’s cold and rough sometimes, but it’s not as bad as Dumping Day.” Read the article here 18:24

‘Tis the season in southwestern Nova Scotia! Fishermen gearing up for Nov. 30 start of lobster fishery

Unless delayed by weather, the lobster season in lobster fishing area (LFA) 34 – which takes in all of Yarmouth County and parts of Shelburne and Digby counties – wll kick off the last Monday of November. This year the opening day falls on Nov. 30. Opening day is also known as dumping day. It’s the day that captains and their crews leave wharfs at 6 a.m. in this fishing district to dump their traps at sea – hoping for good catches when they haul them back up. There are around 980 licence holders in LFA 34. With boats weighed down with hundreds of traps,,, Read the rest here 13:24

Lobster season off southern N.S. opens after weather delay – optimism as dumping day begins

CBC_News_logoFisheries and Oceans Canada had postponed the opening for five days, fearing poor weather during the past week would make it too dangerous for fishermen. The Canadian Coast Guard and dozens of fisheries officers are monitoring the first day. In Meteghan, N.S., crowds gathered at the wharf Saturday morning. Fishermen there say it’s been one of the longest weather delays to the start of the season in recent memory. [email protected]