Tag Archives: F/V Scandies Rose

F/V Scandies Rose: Inaccurate Design Calculations May Have Put Scandies Rose in Harm’s Way

According to the Marine Safety Center, the hydrostatics model that the naval architect provided for the vessel “did not accurately represent the F/V Scandies Rose,” for multiple reasons. MSC alleged that it did not accurately model poop deck or forecastle enclosed volume, did not model the bulwarks, had significantly less superstructure windage than the actual vessel, appeared to have much different tank capacities than the vessel capacity plan, and neglected downflooding in calculations. >click to read< 07:50

F/V Scandies Rose: U.S. Coast Guard and NTSB conclude formal public hearing proceedings of the tragedy

The joint investigation board reviewed and considered evidence related to the loss of the fishing vessel, which occurred on Dec. 31, 2019. The board heard from 43 witnesses, who provided testimony into the conditions influencing the vessel prior to and at the time of the casualty. Testimony also focused on weather, icing, training fisheries, the Scandies Rose’s material condition, owner and operator organizational structures and culture, the regulatory compliance record of the vessel, Coast Guard policy, and practices related to vessel design, engineering and inspections.,,, Recordings of the proceedings are available,,, Documents, exhibits, helpful videos, Board biographies, and other hearing information is available >click to read< 15:43

F/V Scandies Rose: Investigation Takes a New Look at Crab Boat Stability

Last week’s hearings on the tragic sinking of the ill-fated fishing vessel Scandies Rose have raised questions about the stability booklet requirements for crab boats, which are routinely exposed to severe freezing spray in Alaskan waters. Many crab boat sinkings have been blamed on ice buildup and loss of stability over the decades, but the U.S. Coast Guard design standard for ice accumulation relies on an IMO rule that was not formulated with crab vessels in mind, leading several naval architects who testified last week to question whether it is time for a revision. >click to read< 09:19

F/V Scandies Rose: Expert witnesses point to flawed stability calculations

When the Scandies Rose sank on New Year’s Eve of 2019, fishermen from all over Alaska were shocked. Five of the crew perished when the ship rolled onto its side, along with the ship’s captain Gary Cobban. Two crewmembers were rescued from a life raft by a Coast Guard helicopter crew.,, This week, the Coast Guard convened a Marine Board investigation into the cause of the sinking. So far, expert witnesses have described serious problems with the boat’s stability report, which is a rating of how stable the vessel is and how much equipment it can bear. And those issues might extend to many other fishing boats around Alaska. >Audio, click to read/listen< 09:54

F/V Scandies Rose: Tragedy survivor details harrowing experience during sinking

Jon Lawler, who was on the F/V Scandies Rose on Dec. 31, 2019, when the boat began rapidly sinking into the sea,,, As soon as things began going wrong around 10 p.m. that New Year’s Eve, Lawler knew something was severely amiss, he said, and immediately ran upstairs, encountering Capt. Gary Cobban in the process. “And I look at Gary,” he said. “And I said, ‘What the f— is going on? What’s going on?’ And he said, ‘I don’t know what’s going on. I think we’re f—— sinking.’ ‘No f—— s— we’re sinking.’ Fast forward, and Lawler would miraculously make it outside the boat alive, donning a rescue suit. That, though, was hardly the end of the distress. Video, >click to read< 13:35

F/V Scandies Rose: Survivor Jon Lawler’s Wrenching Testimony, Experts note serious flaws in a USCG regulation

The architects who testified were not involved with the development of the stability booklet for the Scandies Rose, a Washington managed boat which went down around 10 p.m. in the Gulf of Alaska during a storm that generated National Weather Service warnings of heavy freezing spray. Also Wednesday, Jon Lawler, one of the two survivors of the seven-person crew, offered wrenching testimony of the final minutes before the boat went under. After donning a survival suit, he exited the wheelhouse amid what he described as sheer panic as the boat tilted crazily and tossed people about.  >click to read< 17:38

‘We are rolling over’ – The inquiry into the Bering Sea sinking of the F/V Scandies Rose crab boat opened with a mayday call

Through the buzz of airwave static, a voice can be heard giving coordinates in the Gulf of Alaska. Then four chilling words: “We are rolling over.” This nighttime Dec. 31, 2019, mayday transmission from the Scandies Rose, a Washington-managed crab boat, was played Monday morning as the Coast Guard launched two weeks of public hearings to investigate the sinking that took the lives of five of the seven crew. The Coast Guard Marine Board of Investigation is the highest level of inquiry into accidents, and the schedule includes testimony from the vessel’s co-owner, two survivors, former crew, naval architects and people involved in repairs. >click to read< 13:08

Broadcasting Live: F/V Scandies Rose Marine Board of Investigation Hearing

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U.S. Coast Guard Inquiry of F/V Scandies Rose sinking begins in Seattle on Monday

A two-week federal inquiry into the fatal sinking of the F/V Scandies Rose, lost on New Year’s Eve 2019 west of Kodiak Island, will open on Monday in Seattle. The U.S. Coast Guard and partner agencies will hold a virtual formal hearing to consider evidence related to the sinking of the Dutch Harbor-based fishing vessel until March 5. The 130-foot crab boat sank near Sutwik Island, Alaska around 10 p.m. on Dec. 31, 2019 with seven crew members aboard. Two fishermen were rescued wearing gumby survival suits in a life raft, but five others were never found.  >click to read< 07:50 To ensure public access and participation, the hearing will be streamed live each day at click> https://livestream.com/uscginvestigations,

U.S. Coast Guard to hold virtual formal hearing for loss of F/V Scandies Rose

The U.S. Coast Guard is scheduled to conduct a formal hearing starting Monday February 22 in Edmonds Wash., to consider evidence related to the sinking of the fishing vessel Scandies Rose. The hearing will focus on the conditions influencing the vessel prior to and at the time of the casualty. This will include weather, icing, fisheries, the Scandies Rose’s material condition, owner and operator organizational structures and culture, the regulatory compliance record of the vessel, and testimony from the survivors and others.>click to read< 12:21

Marine Board of Investigation: Coast Guard looking for details regarding F/V Scandies Rose ahead of public hearing, November 25, 2020 – >click to read<

One year after the F/V Scandies Rose sinks: Family honors the victims

December 31, 2020 marks one year since a mayday call that changed lives. The F/V Scandies Rose fishing boat issued the call off the coast of Kodiak, during a sinking some crew members would not survive. Family members of a few of the victims said they will commemorate the lives lost at sea Thursday evening at 9:50, the time the mayday call went out. Please >click to read, and watch the video< . 11:49

Marine Board of Investigation: Coast Guard looking for details regarding F/V Scandies Rose ahead of public hearing

After almost a year of investigation into the Dec. 31, 2019, sinking of the F/V Scandies Rose that left only two survivors, investigators are still looking for information before a public hearing in February. The Coast Guard’s Marine Board of Investigation will hold a public hearing into the loss of the F/V Scandies Rose from Feb. 22 through March 5. The public hearing will be recorded and livestreamed for those who cannot attend in person. The MBI is looking into why the 130-foot crabber sank near Sutwik Island on New Year’s Eve, which resulted in the deaths of five crew members,,, The MBI also has the testimonies of the two survivors, Dean Gribble Jr. and John Lawler, who were found floating in high seas and freezing temperatures. >click to read< 13:25

Settlement reached in sinking of F/V Scandies Rose for more than $9 million to surviving crewmen and families

The owners of the Scandies Rose have reached a settlement of more than $9 million with two surviving crew and the families of four men who died when the Washington-managed crab boat went down Dec. 31 off Alaska. Jerry Markham, an attorney for the families of three of the deceased, also confirmed the settlement, and said his clients “are relieved and pleased that the matter is settled.” The Scandies Rose disaster took the lives of five crew,,, The two survivors of the Scandies Rose, Dean Gribble Jr., and Jon Lawler, told harrowing tales of a severe list that imperiled the vessel. Both Lawler and Gribble eventually made it to a life raft.,,, >click to read< 10:14

Coast Guard Seeks Information Regarding Sinking Of The F/V Scandies Rose

Coast Guard investigators would appreciate anyone with information about the vessel or conditions around the time the ship was lost to come forward, according to Petty Officer Janessa Warschkow. “Whether that is former sailing experience on board the Scandies Rose, experience with the crew of the Scandies Rose, if you know the weather between Chiniak and Kodiak on December 31 of 2019,” she said. “Any information is helpful for the ongoing investigation.” >click to read< 09:05

UPDATE: U.S. Coast Guard Marine Board of Investigation into loss of F/V Scandies Rose has postponed Pubic Hearing

The U.S. Coast Guard has postponed the public hearing, part of the larger investigation into circumstances surrounding the sinking of the commercial fishing vessel (F/V) Scandies Rose and the loss of five of its seven crewmembers. The hearing was scheduled to take place in Seattle September 8-18, 2020. The decision to delay the public hearing was made to protect the health of the investigative team, the witnesses, and families and to comply with federal and state travel restrictions to reduce the spread of COVID-19. “The public hearing is a critical part of the Marine Board of Investigation (MBI) process, one that requires transparency. Those affected by this tragedy have the right to attend in person and, if we can’t afford them that, we owe them an alternative means,” said Cmdr. Greg Callaghan, MBI Chair. >click to read< 13:57

Skipper of ‘Deadliest Catch’ Boat Describes Daring 2019 Coast Guard Rescue

After the Scandies Rose, a fishing vessel from Dutch Harbor, Alaska, went down Dec. 31, 2019, in the Bering Sea in 50-plus mile per hour winds, 20-foot waves and freezing spray, the U.S. Coast Guard searched five hours for the ship’s life raft, ultimately rescuing two of the seven crew members. An upcoming episode of the Discovery Channel reality show “Deadliest Catch” will feature new footage of the Coast Guard’s rapid response to the life-or-death emergency. According to survivors of the Scandies Rose, only about 10 minutes passed between being roused from sleep and having to hit the chilly water. >click to read< , these are the posts we entered, regarding the tragedy, >click to read< 10:48

F/V Scandies Rose: U.S. Coast Guard convenes Marine Board of Investigation

The U.S. Coast Guard has convened a Marine Board of Investigation into the loss of F/V Scandies Rose and five of its seven crewmembers. A Marine Board of Investigation is the highest level of investigation in the Coast Guard. Upon completion of the investigation, the Board will issue a report to the commandant with the evidence collected, the facts established and its conclusions and recommendations. >click to read< 14:09

F/V Scandies Rose: Efforts underway to locate sunken crab boat

Gerry Cobban Knagin lost her brother Gary Cobban Jr., the skipper and partial owner of the vessel, and her nephew, Gary’s son, David. Knagin said the tug Endurance from Paradigm Marine will head Feb. 9 to the area near Sutwick Island. A salvage crew will use sonar to pinpoint where the boat went down and send a remotely operated vehicle and divers to take pictures. It’s both exciting and emotional news for Knagin. Video, >click to read< 08:19

  Tugboat sets off to investigate sinking of Scandies Rose – The tugboat Endurance set off from Kodiak Sunday morning to locate and document the wreckage of the Scandies Rose,,, >click to read< 13:08

Seattle memorial held for crew member lost in sinking of F/V Scandies Rose

Tony Ganacias introduced his son to the sea when he was working at a cannery near Cold Bay in Alaska, and bought him his first boat at age 17. That was it, Ganacias said. From then on for Arthur it was nothing but boats and fishing and cars, including his beloved 1971 Dodge Charger. On Saturday afternoon, Arthur Ganacias, known to most everyone as “Art,” was remembered by his father and other family and friends just a little more than a month after he and four other crew were lost when the Scandies Rose went down in 20-foot seas in the Gulf of Alaska. Ganacias, 50, was the boat’s engineer. photo gallery >click to read< 06:44

When F/V Scandies Rose sunk west of Kodiak, he survived. Now he’s grappling with losing his crewmates.

Dean Gribble, one of the survivors, grew up in Washington. He began salmon tendering when he was 11, and he’s spent the past 21 years crab fishing. “I was born a commercial fisherman,” said Gribble. “It’s in my blood. My dad and my family have all been in it. Other kids grew up having football or baseball players as their heroes, and I had crabbers as mine.” On New Year’s Eve, Gribble hadn’t planned to be on the Scandies Rose, which is homported in Dutch Harbor. But a crew member quit in late December, and his friend, John Lawler, asked him to fill in. >click to read< 06:55

F/V Scandies Rose: Coast Guard board, NTSB, to investigate sinking of crab boat on New Year’s Eve

The Coast Guard has formed a Marine Board of Investigation to determine the causes of the sinking of the Scandies Rose,,, The board was formed earlier this week, and it is still unclear where and when a hearing will be scheduled, according to Chief Petty Officer Matthew Schofield, a public affairs officer with the 17th Coast Guard District in Juneau. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) also is investigating, >click to read< 10:49

F/V Scandies Rose: Stuart Coast Guardsman recalls saving two fishermen off coast of Alaska

“I just told myself this what I trained for. I volunteered to do this so I knew what I had to. It was up to me to execute it,” said Evan Grills. Grills, 24,is a Petty Officer 3rd Class in the U.S. Coast Guard. “My nerves were OK until the door opened,” he said, as the rescue swimmer recalled the signal his crew received New Year’s Eve night. Video,  >click to read< 06:22

Battling the waves to stay alive: A tale of survival from the F/V Scandies Rose

For John Lawler, the only encouraging thing was a glow from a second life raft about a quarter-mile away. He hoped that light would stay on, and someone would find him and crewmate Dean Gribble Jr. in the pitch-black aftermath of Scandies Rose crab boat going down in the Gulf of Alaska. “We would lose sight of it because the waves were so big, but it would always reappear, ” said Lawler, a 34-year-old crabber from Anchorage, Alaska. >click to read< 18:51

A ‘battleship’ of a crab boat – Owner of Alaska crab boat thought of Scandies Rose as unsinkable

The F/V Scandies Rose, which was managed out of Seattle, sank suddenly near Sutwik Island, off the coast of the Alaskan Peninsula. Two crew members were rescued by the Coast Guard from life rafts; the other five were not found. Two of the lost crew members and one of the survivors were from Washington. Dan Mattsen, who owns the Scandies Rose with two other partners, said he is still processing what happened. He is interviewed by  KIRO Radio’s Dori Monson >click to read, listen< 19:27

In Alaska, commercial fishing remains dangerous despite increased safety measures

Commercial fishing was once the most dangerous job in the country, (Scott Wilwert said, and during the 1970s and 1980s an increase in accidents and deaths ultimately led to the passage of the Commercial Fishing Industry Vessel Safety Act of 1988. The regulations required boats to have survival suits and life rafts and to carry out onboard safety drills, among other safety measures.,, “There was a time in the ’70s and ’80s where, I think, even the fishermen would tell you that there was a mentality, that ‘you have to go out but you don’t have to come back’ kind of thing,” Wilwert said. “That just doesn’t exist, nobody thinks that way anymore.” >click to read< 07:29

After the sinking of the F/V Scandies Rose, an aftermath of anguish

Before Alaska crabber Brock Rainey headed out to start a new season, he checked in with his longtime friend Mike Daily. This winter was no different. “Tossing lines for the Bering Sea today…Love you brother,” Rainey texted in the hours before the boat he crewed on, the Scandies Rose, left Kodiak on Monday. The 130-foot vessel never reached its next port. Rainey and four others, including two men from Washington, were not found during a 20-hour search that was called off Wednesday night.  >click to read< 16:53

A Fundraiser has been started by Hailey and Lukas Engstrom for the family’s of F/V Scandies Rose>Please click here<

F/V Scandies Rose: “He definitely was doing what he loved.” Family, friends speak on Kellogg man after boat disaster

Thoughts, prayers, and support is pouring in from the city Brock Rainey called home: Kellog, Idaho. “He truly loved being a fisherman,” Dolph Hoch, a friend of Brock Rainey and Kellogg resident, said. “He would’ve probably died on that ship if it was January 1st, 2020, or if it was January 1st, 2050. He loved the ocean. He loved the Bering Sea. He loved everything about it,” Hoch said. Video, >click to read< 09:46

F/V Scandies Rose: Survivor Dean Gribble Jr. describes 20-foot seas,”worst possible conditions.”- Calls to loved ones reveal rough conditions before sinking

In a YouTube video, Dean Gribble Jr. explains the people on board the Dutch Harbor-based vessel – with business operations out of Seattle – went “from sleeping to swimming” in about 10 minutes when the vessel began to capsize. “It happened really fast,” Gribble Jr. said. The video from Gribble Jr. can be seen in its entirety >click here< ,, Gribble Jr. says he and John Lawler were in a life raft for “five hours or so” before being rescued by a Jayhawk helicopter. They were wearing survival suits. >click to read< 14:18

Calls to loved ones reveal rough conditions before sinking – The 130-foot (40-meter) Scandies Rose was traveling in an area with warnings about strong winds and heavy freezing spray, said Louise Fode, a warning coordination meteorologist with the National Weather Service. >click to read< 14:39

A Fundraiser has been started by Hailey and Lukas Engstrom for the family’s of F/V Scandies Rose

From the fundraiser, My name is Hailey Engstrom. My brother Lukas and I are raising money for the families that suffered this horrible tragedy. Our father, We Engstrom recently retired from the Scandies as the deck boss for 10 years, and with the company for nearly 20 years. Coming from a fishing family, this accident hit home with us extremely hard. >click to read< Please contribute to this fundraiser if you can! 08:36

F/V Scandies Rose: Family of missing fishermen mourn but pledge to keep fishing

Fishing runs deep in the DNA of the Cobban family so they know as well as anyone how dangerous the profession can be.  Four generations of commercial fishermen from the family have fished out of Kodiak. On New Year’s Eve, members from two generations were lost when their vessel capsized off of the Alaska Peninsula near Sutwik Island. On Wednesday evening, the Coast Guard called off the search for five of the crew members who weren’t located during the initial response.  That’s left family members coming to terms with the fact that their loved ones likely won’t be coming home. >click to read< 07:08