Tag Archives: Fish Food and Allied Workers’

Hunger Strike – FISH-NL VP protesting outside DFO in St. John’s

The vice president of FISH-NL is camping outside the Department of Fisheries and Oceans building in St. John’s in protest. Richard Gillett, a fish harvester from Twillingate, says he will stay outside the building — without food and drinking only water — until his two demands are met. “I’m going to stay here as long as it takes to get a meeting with the minister of fisheries, and I’m prepared to go all the way on this one,” he said. Gillett is vice president of the Federation of Independent Sea Harvesters of Newfoundland and Labrador (FISH-NL), a group of fishermen trying to break away from the Fish, Food and Allied Workers (FFAW) union. FISH-NL is seeking to be ratified as the bargaining agent for the province’s fish harvesters. Gillett is requesting a meeting with federal Fisheries Minister Dominic LeBlanc, and an independent review of the relationship between DFO and the FFAW. click here to continue reading the story 15:56

Letter: Fisherfolk should get behind new union by Oswan Tucker, Reef’s Harbour

ryan-clearyNow is the time to finish what we started last year, which was to get rid of the FFAW. The Fish, Food and Allied Workers union has neglected us, taken advantage of us and turned fisherfolk against one another. It shouldn’t be like that. We can do better than that, and now we will. We have acquired Ryan Cleary to head up our new union, which will be named the Federation of Independent Sea Harvesters of Newfoundland and Labrador (FISH-NL). This new union will look after the best interests of Newfoundland and Labrador fishermen and women — and only them. It will have a constitution drawn up to protect fisher folk from the kind of things we had to put up with from the FFAW. Read the rest here 09:06

Dire warnings in the battle for Atlantic Canada’s lucrative northern shrimp

CPT109344364_hd-701x1024Nova Scotia fishermen and politicians are warning Ottawa about a possible repeat of the political meddling that led to the devastating collapse of the cod stocks in the early 1990s. This time, however, the problem isn’t cod, it’s northern shrimp. A federal panel reviewing the quota for Newfoundland’s north coast wrapped up the last of six public hearings Friday in Halifax, where 150 fishermen, processors, industry representatives and politicians packed a stuffy conference room. With hundreds of millions of dollars at stake, the temperature in the room went up as the presenters traded barbs over the fate of a lucrative industry that is only around 40 years old. Read the rest here 20:56

Harvesters want higher Gulf halibut quotas for Newfoundland and Labrador fishermen

Halibut%20(Hippoglossus%20hippoglossus)Halibut harvesters in Newfoundland and Labrador are calling on the federal Liberals to address the previous government’s wrongs by establishing what the union calls “fair” quota allocations for Gulf of St. Lawrence halibut. In a press release today, the Fish Food and Allied Workers (FFAW-Unifor), the union that represents fishers in this province, said it will be making a presentation to the Gulf Groundfish Advisory Committee reviewing halibut allocation decisions made since 2007. “Previous sharing agreements have resulted in significant and disproportionate reductions in quota for Newfoundland and Labrador harvesters,” FFAW president Keith Sullivan said in a prepared statement. Read the rest here 16:34

Newfoundland and Labrador: Fishing — by the numbers

fishing by the numbersIt can make your eyes glaze over, I’ll grant you that. And if you’re not emotionally or financially tied to the argument that’s being hotly debated in the public forum, you probably have tuned out. So it is with the current, ongoing spat over northern shrimp. It’s the case of the duelling reports; with the Fish Food and Allied Workers on the one hand arguing the social and economic benefits of the inshore fishery, and the Canadian Association of Prawn Producers and their factor freezer trawlers on the other, with numbers to argue that they, too, employ local people and support the local economy. Both have statistics to support their cause. Both say the reports being used by their other side are flawed. Read the article here 09:38

Lump sum payments never promised to scallop fishermen, says FFAW

The Fish, Food and Allied Workers Union says it never promised lump sum payouts from a compensation fund for scallop fishermen from the Strait of Belle Isle. Union representative Jason Spingle took the stand Friday, in a lawsuit brought by 71 fish harvesters from the Great Northern Peninsula and south coast of Labrador. He told the Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador that talks about compensation began in 2011. Nalcor agreed in 2014 to pay $2.6 million to compensate fish harvesters. The union argues that the money is to be paid out over 30 years,,, Read the rest here 17:19

Fishery the ‘economic giant’ of the province, says FFAW leader

Just weeks before Newfoundland and Labrador’s provincial election, the fisheries union is starting a campaign to promote rural issues.  The campaign is called Rural Works, and it is focused on the importance of the fishery to rural towns around the province. “The reason we were settled here is because of the fishery. The reason we remain here is because of the fishery,” said Fish, Food and Allied Workers president Keith Sullivan at a news conference Thursday.   “It remains a primary economic driver …worth over $1 billion to our province. We think it can be worth much more,” said Sullivan. Read the rest here 19:09

NL: Fish, Food and Allied Workers’ stance on shrimp allocations criticized

[ST. JOHN’S, NL] – The Fish, Food and Allied Workers’ (FFAW) union is putting a spin on northern shrimp quota allocations for its own benefit, according to the executive director of the Canada Association of Prawn Producers. Bruce Chapman (man with a paper asshole) says that the FFAW’s contention that DFO is unfairly favouring the offshore sector when it comes to northern shrimp stocks isn’t true. dailybizbuzz  Read more here  21:47