Tag Archives: gloucester

Gloucester: Lobstermen push against whale rules – ‘We’ve borne the brunt’

The evening began with a presentation from NOAA Fisheries’ Mike Asaro and Colleen Coogan that offered a historical backdrop on the status of the North Atlantic right whale stock and an explanation of the specific protectionist measures adopted in April by the Atlantic Large Whale Take Reduction Team.,, In Massachusetts and New Hampshire, lobstermen are tasked with reducing their vertical lines by 30 percent. In Maine, where there has been significant pushback by state officials and the nation’s most formidable lobster fleet, the target is significantly higher — 50 percent. Then came the comment period and the usual choosing of the sides. Photo’s,  >click to read< 22:04

“I woke up to my dad’s screaming, ‘We’re on, we’re on!,” Teen’s first catch a big fish tale

Devin Zelck was fast asleep on the deck of the boat Dogbar at 7 a.m. last Friday when the big fish took the bait. “I woke up to my dad’s screaming, ‘We’re on, we’re on!,” she said. Ten hours later,,, Jim Alvarez, the captain of the boat who, along with Zelck’s father, helped the teen haul in the massive fish, said it was the biggest tuna he has caught in his 10-year career. Devin Zelck said she had gone tuna-fishing with her father, Steve, a commercial fisherman out of Gloucester, several times but had always come up empty. They headed out at 5 a.m. last Friday on the Dogbar for what was supposed to be a short, half-day trip. >click to read<  08:47

April 24th, 25th – Fishermen safety training planned in Newburyport, Gloucester

Fishing Partnership Support Services, which was founded in 1997 and maintains offices in four Massachusetts port communities, announces the following training schedule: April 24: Safety and survival training, U.S. Coast Guard Station, 65 Water St., Newburyport, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 25: Drill conductor training, U.S. Coast Guard Station, Newburyport, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Safety and survival training, U.S. Coast Guard Station, 17 Harbor Loop, Gloucester, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. April 26: Drill conductor training, U.S. Coast Guard Station Gloucester, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Lunch is provided. Safety and survival training will cover: man-overboard procedures, onboard firefighting, emergency communications, flood and pump operation, survival suits, life raft deployment and boarding, and basic first aid. >click to read<12:30

Behind the Scenes with Wicked Tuna

The men on the dock were the tuna boat captains who head the cast of the upcoming eighth season of the National Geographic channel’s reality show Wicked Tuna, airing this year. They had spent the summer fishing—and filming—and had plans to ply the waters throughout the fall, but for the moment they were fulfilling the responsibilities of their other job: TV star. “We’re just fishermen who got a shot at doing something really cool,” says T.J. Ott, who captains the Hot Tuna on and off the show, which has developed a cult following. >click to read<21:27

Gloucester: NOAA drops port’s rank in latest report, even as local fish landings, values rise

U.S. fish and shellfish landings increased incrementally last year in both volume and value, while Massachusetts ended the year with the second-highest value of commercial landings among the 50 states, according to an annual report on U.S. fisheries released Thursday by NOAA.,,, The report, however, reflected a reigning status quo for the port of Gloucester. America’s oldest seaport produced slight increases in volume and value of its landings, while its ranking among other U.S. commercial ports declined slightly. The volume of Gloucester landings rose 1 million pounds, or 1.5 percent, from the previous year to 64 million pounds. The value of those landings grew by $1 million, or 1.9 percent, to $53 million from $52 million in 2016. >click to read<20:44

Letter: Fishermen need federal help

It is time to wake up. I read in Fishery Nation about protesters and fishermen opposed to a hotel on the waterfront in Portland, Maine. It seems their city fathers are having a difficult time turning those developers down due to less commercial fishing in their town. I can understand it is hard for them to turn down hotels and other businesses. We in Gloucester face the same. Our fisherman can be displaced and new developments can perhaps provide more tax dollars to the city, but at our fisherman’s expense. >click to read<09:23

Columbus Day Trip With Captain Matthew Parisi of Gloucester

Looking back in time and remembering my dad Captain Matthew Parisi of Gloucester, I can never forget what he taught me as to where to fish each trip. But every Columbus Day he had special spots. Sometimes it would be like off Thatcher’s Island, Middle Bank or off the Cape in the shoal water. The herring would be around at that time of year to spawn and the haddock, cod and other ground fish would come to eat the spawn. One trip I remember was off Cape Cod,,, >click to read<09:42

High Liner: Captain Salvatore Parisi and F/V St. Rosalie

My grandparents, Salvatore Parisi, and his wife Grace came to this country in 1922 from Sicily, and settled in Gloucester, Mass. They had four children at the time of arrival. Oldest son Joseph, and daughters Rosalie, Lena, and Grace., and he bought a fishing boat called the St. Rosalie. Along the way, a few more children were added and they had six sons, Joe, Ben, Charles, Tony, Mathew, and Nick, who all went fishing. >click to read<14:37

Gloucester’s annual Overdose Vigil grows and glows on waterfront

Down on Stacy Boulevard, over by the Blynman Bridge flagpole, they gathered again and lit their luminaries as the last of the evening’s light left the sky. There were 520 luminaries by Patti Day’s count, up 40 from last year, and she said the counting wouldn’t end till the vigil itself ended. Patti Day — a sister of Kathy Day, an original organizer of the annual Overdose Vigil, now in its eight year — is herself a recovered heroin addict. She is also a tan, fit living contradiction of two common misconceptions about addicts: That they are low-life denizens of some netherworld, and that they are bound to relapse. >click to read<12:18

Dixon McGlohon, 27- ‘Wicked Tuna’ Fish buyer city’s 11th overdose of year

Lucas Pina, general manager at the Lynn-based North Atlantic Traders, sent a text message to company buyer and driver Dixon McGlohon of Gloucester on Tuesday afternoon, thanking him for putting so much extra effort into the job. “I just told him, ‘Thanks for stepping up,'” Pina said Thursday, “and he responded, ‘Just doing my job.’ Now that’s class, and that’s the kind of guy he was.” Just a few hours later, McGlohon, known for his appearances on the National Geographic reality TV show “Wicked Tuna,” was pronounced dead at the age of 27, thought by police and Fire Department responders to be Gloucester’s latest victim in the ongoing opioid crisis. Police and the Essex District Attorney’s office are still awaiting a confirmed cause of death from the office of the state medical examiner. >click to read<19:06

Dear Congressman Moulton, about that Bill? HR-200?

I have been a supporter of yours from day one. I donated money, made your signs, found sign locations, even had my family and some of my friends support you. And they did! I was surprised and disappointed to find out through our, yours and my local newspaper, that you had voted against Congressman Don Youngs Bill, HR – 200. As you know Seth, I have informed you of the issues our fisherman are facing such as untrusted and sometimes disputed science used by NOAA, the North East Canyon and Seamounts National Marine Monument off Cape Cod that our fishing boats depended on for whiting fishing, as fishermen from other ports are also shut out from their fisheries. Congressman, it seems as though you are not actually listening to your constituents. Sam Parisi >click to read<16:57

American oldest seaport, Gloucester needs new fishermen to keep Gloucester fishing into future !

There is a problem facing most of our fishing communities today in the U.S. Fish stocks are coming back, and most of our fishermen are gone. Our fishing communities need to get young people into the fishing industry. Here’s an example: NOTICE America’s oldest seaport needs new fishermen to keep the City of Gloucester fishing into the future! Whiting fishing begins July 15, 2018, and at age of 75, Sam Novello might have to go back whiting fishing again because lack of fishermen in today’s commercial fishing industry. (He’s looking for a crewman.) >click to read<09:15

Gloucester: Intershell’s new boat a sign fishing still to be done

A week before Gloucester gives itself over completely to the annual St. Peter’s Fiesta, the city’s fishing fleet and shoreside stakeholders had something tangible to celebrate in the effort to return the city to its fishing glory. Undaunted by gray skies and passing showers, nearly 50 people assembled Saturday at the Intershell facility on Harbor Cove to honor the christening and blessing of the newest vessel in the Gloucester fleet — Intershell’s wholly refitted, 55-foot surf clam boat, F/V Bing Bing. The all-metal vessel, though built in Moss Point, Mississippi, in 1977 as a sea clam boat, has evolved into an all-Gloucester boat through the 10-month re-fitting that included the work of dozens of local tradesmen, the facilities at Rose’s Marine and the entire Intershell team. >click to read<15:23

The Life of a Fisherman, On the Small Screen: Gloucester’s Famous TV Stars

America’s oldest seaport, Gloucester, Massachusetts is 31 miles north of Boston. Settled in 1623 as an English colony, its charter predates both those of Salem and Boston (1626 and 1630, respectively).,, The lore of Gloucester’s brine also includes a colony of commercial fishermen. Some of those seafarers are featured on National Geographic’s hit television series Wicked Tuna. New Boston Post caught up with Dave Marciano, captain of the Hard Merchandise, for some behind-the-scenes dish about the show, to discuss why the popular series launches from Gloucester, and most importantly to understand how the endangered bluefin tuna population is protected from over-fishing. >click to read< 15:00

‘Dead in the Water’ screened in Gloucester – ‘We knew it was bad, but we had no idea how bad’

There have been almost a half-dozen screenings now of the “Dead in the Water” documentary on the commercial fishing crisis and one things is clear: Most people who don’t fish for a living have no real grasp of the complexities and challenges that fishermen face every day just to keep fishing. That, of course, was one of the motivating forces in the making of the film, both for director David Wittkower, a Rockport native, and stakeholder producers John Bell and Angela Sanfilippo.,, “It’s accurate and it’s painful,” Sanfilippo said Saturday morning before the first of two sold-out screenings at the Cape Ann Museum. “But it’s the truth.” >click to read< 18:25

“The Bomb Cyclone Storm” (explosive cyclogenesis) – Its a Mess Everywhere!

Gloucester – Water and whiteouts: Homes, businesses flooded; thousands without powerclick here00:41

New Bedford – Carlos Rafael continues to give Feds headaches as boat breaks freeclick here

Maine – Storm triggers Maine’s worst tidal flooding since historic Blizzard of 1978click here

PHOTOS: Massachusetts Flooding During Blizzard 2018click here

New Hampshire – Bomb Cyclone Pounds Seacoastclick here

Nova Scotia – Powerful storm surge rips up roads as it slams into Nova Scotia coastclick here

Gloucester: City needs full-time fishing director

The need for a full-time fisheries director is now. Back in 2015, then interim Mayor Sefatia Romeo Theken and the Gloucester Fisheries commissioners agreed there was need for a full-time director. It has been almost 20 years since we had someone full-time. They also agreed the job was horrendous and time-consuming. In 2016, at a mayoral debate that I attended, I asked both candidates, Paul McGeary and Romeo Theken if they would support a full-time fisheries director. click here to read the story 20:11

‘He cared about everyone’: John ‘Gus’ Foote, advocate for veterans, fishermen, seniors, dies at 87

A leading voice for Gloucester’s seniors, fishermen and the people of his beloved Ward 2 is now silent. John A. “Gus” Foote, who represented Ward 2 on Gloucester’s City Council for more than three decades and served as a tireless advocate for many residents across the city, died early Friday morning at Addison Gilbert Hospital. He was 87. A decorated Purple Heart and U.S. Marine Corps veteran who served in the Korean War, he continued to attend the city’s Memorial Day and Veterans Day ceremonies, wearing his Purple Heart cap, right up to this past May’s Memorial Day service at Gloucester High School. click here to read the story 11:22

Gloucester: At Fishermen’s Memorial Service, daughter speaks language of loss

Candace Unis, who will speak at Saturday’s annual Fishermen’s Memorial Service of the grief of losing a loved one to the sea, knows of which she speaks. In September 1978, her father left on a Sunday for two days of fishing on his nephew’s 52-foot trawler and was never seen again. There were no mayday calls, no signs of distress. The boat, the Alligator, went down — possibly hit by a freighter — with three men onboard: Unis’s 55-year-old father, James Sinagra, his 46-year-old nephew, Carlo “Bronco” Sinagra; and a 26-year-old crewman, Glenn Guitarr. It was the second boat lost out of Gloucester that month, with a total of nine lives lost, and to Unis, who was 25 at the time, it was a wound that would never really heal. click here to read the story 10:22

When: Saturday, Aug. 26, at 5 p.m., Where: Monument of the Fisherman on Stacy Boulevard

Senators and Congressmen – Problems that are facing the commercial fishermen today need your immediate attention

To whom it may Concern: I am retired fisherman out of Gloucester, MA. I would appreciate if our Senators, Congressmen and anyone in office would help us. I am listing some of the problems that are facing the commercial fishermen today and need your immediate attention and help. Most of these problems can only be resolved at the Federal Level. 1. The Magnusson Act needs to be updated.  The wording needs to be changed so that the Courts and NOAA will have to consider and accept other scientific data.2. The Saltonstall Kennedy (SK) Act. Enacted in 1954.,,, click here to read the letter  10:11

Letter: We must work together to preserve fishery, industry – Richard Beal, Gloucester

When I started fishing, everywhere you went you could see boats. They were of all types and sizes, domestic and foreign. There were no regulations. The only limitation on you was how hard you could physically work. It was a free-for-all, the Wild West revisited.  Now I go fishing days and often don’t see another commercial fishing boat. It’s been my generation of fishermen that has bridged the gap from what was to what is. From an unregulated, volume-based industry to one that is highly regulated and quality oriented. I believe there has been more changes in my lifetime than in all of the industries prior history. click here to read the letter 09:48

No silver bullet Mr. Bullard?

My response to Mr. Bullard. (A Message from John Bullard, Regional Administrator – There Is No Silver Bullet for Groundfish). Mr. Bullard attends many meetings, and as he said himself, it is his job. Also his job is to see that fish stocks rebuild, however if we are to believe NOAA scientific data our cod stocks and flounder are in the worst shape under his administration, even though he imposed tough regulations at the fisherman’s expense without any consideration of their welfare. Instead of coming up with a solution that fisherman and government can live with, he discourage us that are still left in the fishing industry. He does not offer any remedy  for those that are left. He says we need more monitoring, but at who’s cost? He says we need more law enforcement. I can not see where any of this can increase the ground fish stocks. Now, I am not blaming him alone and rather than blame the government or our fisherman, lets look for an economic plan to see our fisherman make a living and a plan to see fish stocks increase. I gave my plan to our local politicians, that being the need for a Fish Bill. Like the Farm Bill, and yes they listen to but no one has taken the ball home! After a while, I feel discouraged and want to throw in the towel, but then I think, that is the easy way out. I find myself reading Fisherynation, Seafood news etc., to see what else NOAA going to throw at us! Maybe Mr. Bullard does not see a Silver Bullet perhaps we can open his eyes. Thank You for your attention Sam Parisi, Gloucester, Mass. 09:00

Gloucester: As fleet shrinks, so has blessing ceremony

A fleet of pleasure boats blessed on a sunny Sunday afternoon replaced the fishing vessels that once lined Gloucester’s Outer Harbor during St. Peter’s Fiesta. “The fleet is a mere shadow of what it was 50, 60 years ago,” Gloucester native Mike Gilardi said. The Rev. Jim Achadinha, the pastor of the Catholic community of Gloucester and Rockport, and Bishop Mark O’Connell, the bishop of the North Region of the Archdiocese of Boston, blessed the fleets on Sunday at 3. The few remaining authentic fishing vessels of the Gloucester fleet didn’t come to Stacy Boulevard for the blessing and haven’t for years. Achadinha estimated the last time was 15 years ago. click here to read the story 08:48

Seafood supplier tries to make inroads with local eateries for Gloucester-landed fish

Frank Ragusa is making a point, leaning forward in his chair and punctuating each sentence by banging his hand on the conference table, producing thumps so loud they later sound like explosions on the recording of the conversation.  In between bursts of percussion, the chief executive officer and partner in Gloucester’s Finest Seafood makes the same impassioned point he has been making since he returned to Cape Ann two years ago from Seattle as the director of fresh seafood at Gloucester Seafood Processing. The point is this: The Gloucester story still plays in the farthest reaches of the nation. The saga of America’s oldest commercial fishing port, of slicker-clad, fishermen wrestling fresh marine life out of the cold waters of the Atlantic, still strikes a chord. Out there. click here to read the story 08:06

Safety training offered to fishermen next week in Gloucester

Fishing Partnership Support Services will conduct the last of its spring series of safety trainings for commercial fishermen next week in Gloucester. Safety and Survival at Sea is scheduled for Thursday, May 18, at the Gloucester Coast Guard Station, 17 Harbor Loop, from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. This free program will cover: · Man-overboard procedure· Firefighting and emergency communications · Flood and pump operations · Survival suits· Life raft deployment and boarding · Helicopter hoist procedures · Basic first aid For those fishermen who want to be certified as Drill Conductors, training will continue on Friday, May 19, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the same facility. click here for more detail 13:41

Series of coral protection hearings planned for New England

Federal fishery managers will hold a host of public hearings in New England and New York about a plan to protect corals in key East Coast fishing areas. The New England Fishery Management Council is hosting seven public hearings about alternatives it is considering about the protection of corals in the Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank. The hearings will take place from May 22 to 25 in Montauk, Narragansett, New Bedford, Gloucester, Portsmouth, and Ellsworth. There will also be a web-based hearing on May 26. The fishery council says it wants to collect feedback from fishermen and other stakeholders about the coral protection Link 21:28

From Fisherman to scrap dealer – A Fisherman For Life, This Man Misses The Glouscester Fishing Industry

Sam Sanfilippo was once part of a booming cod fishing industry in Gloucester, Massachusetts. Today, government regulations put in place to maintain cod populations have forced many fishermen out of business. Watch the video, click here 07:59

An Interview with Captain Dave Marciano: Gloucester fishing comes into focus on new season of ‘Wicked Tuna’

The captains of Wicked Tuna, Nat Geo’s top-rated reality series, return for a sixth season Sunday, March 12 at 9 p.m. The cutthroat show about angling off the coast of Gloucester, Massachusetts, pits captains and their boats against each other in a no-holds-barred search for the largest tuna. And that’s largest in terms of size and profits. Among the returning captains are Tyler McLaughlin of the Pinwheel, Dave Marciano of the Hard Merchandise, TJ Ott of the Hot Tuna, Paul Hebert of the Wicked Pissah and Dave Carraro of the FV-Tuna.com. They might be friendly on land, but in the open, choppy waters, they are competitors with the final prize in mind. Recently, Hollywood Soapbox spoke with Marciano about the upcoming season and the bounty of fish that actually changed the angling for everyone. Answers have been edited for style and brevity. Read the interview here 14:02

Gloucester Lobsterman fined $10K for illegal landings in plea deal – Apology to ‘entire fleet’ delivered in courtroom

The Gloucester lobsterman accused of landing 183 illegal lobsters last November pleaded guilty to 20 of the counts, and was fined $10,000. All other charges against him were dismissed under a plea agreement announced Friday in Gloucester District Court. James A. Santapaola Jr., 40, of 16 Forest St., stood quietly before Judge Richard Mori, responding only with a “Yes, sir,” and “No, sir” when asked if he understood the impact of his guilty pleas and whether he had been coerced by anyone into making them. The pleas, fine and dismissals all came through joint recommendations negotiated by Santapaola’s lawyer, Liam O’Connell, assistant district attorney Aimee Conway, and Massachusetts Environmental Police, which had filed the charges at Capt. Joe & Sons Inc. on East Main Street last fall. While Santapaola did not speak, and left the courtroom without making any comment afterward, O’Connell read into the court record a letter in which his client said he was “humbled and humiliated” by the incident. Read the story and apology letter here 08:03

Fishing in Gloucester 2016: The year didn’t go swimmingly for industry

The past year in the commercial fishing industry and along the city’s waterfront has been one of battles, as the city’s legendary fishing industry has fought to remain viable in the midst of regulatory, economic and environmental pressures. Groundfishermen spent much of the year dueling with NOAA Fisheries over who should pay for mandated at-sea monitoring. And fishing advocates, led by the Gloucester-based Northeast Seafood Coalition, continued their crusade questioning the quality of the science NOAA uses in its stock assessments.  Lobstermen, NOAA scientists and elected representatives such as U.S. Rep. Seth Moulton, took on Sweden over the Scandinavian country’s attempt to convince the European Union to list American lobsters as an invasive species and ban their importation. Here’s a look at some of 2016’s premier stories: Read the story here 10:59