Tag Archives: Gov. Mike Dunleavy

Being Ready: Samaritan’s Purse delivers 30-bed field hospital to Bristol Bay Borough

Samaritan’s Purse sent emergency field hospitals to Italy and New York this spring. Both places were badly hit by coronavirus. On Monday, the organization flew one to the Bristol Bay Borough. The borough is the epicenter of fish processing during the short sockeye fishery, and it’s population grows exponentially as seafood workers and fishermen come to the region. The 30-bed hospital can be set up within 48 hours. “It took a lot of cooperation, cause there’s a lot of — various agencies that had to cooperate. And they all did this at record speed, so I’m very thankful for the leadership of everybody who’s involved,” >click to read< 08:53

‘We’re open’: Alaska businesses can operate at full capacity Friday, Dunleavy says

Alaska businesses can open at full capacity on Friday and sports can resume, Gov. Mike Dunleavy announced Tuesday evening. “Friday, we’re open for business across the state of Alaska,” Dunleavy said at a news conference. Alaska will enter phase three and four of the government’s five-phase reopening plan at 8 a.m. Friday. That means restaurants, bars, gyms and other businesses can fully open. All churches, libraries and museums can too. Sports and recreational activities can resume, Dunleavy said. It’s the governor’s latest major lift of coronavirus-related restrictions. Previously, certain businesses could only operate at 25% to 50% capacity. “It’ll all be open, just like it was prior to the virus,” Dunleavy said. >click to read< 10:29

With coronavirus pandemic procedures in place, Copper River salmon season ready to open

Hundreds of vessels and workers flood into Prince William Sound each May for a chance to harvest the first fresh wild king salmon of the year, followed by the famous Copper River sockeye and the broader Prince William Sound pink salmon fisheries. However, with limited road access and health care facilities, city and state officials have been coordinating with the fleet and stakeholders about how to safely allow in deckhands, captains, and processing workers from Outside without inviting the pandemic to Cordova as well. “Fishermen are very concerned and have been concerned since day one,” said Francis Leach, the executive director of the United Fishermen of Alaska. “Now that procedures have been put in place, there are a lot of questions. It’s always a learning curve. Folks are really going to have to pay attention to (the mandate).” >click to read< 14:36

‘It’s gonna kill this community’: A tiny Alaska town and others in the state brace as governor guts budget

The little fishing town of Cordova, perched next to the Copper River Delta in Prince William Sound, is no stranger to the cycles of catastrophe, hardship and recovery. But residents say Alaska’s current budget crisis, which has pitted a Republican governor and his red pen against legislators — and inspired a bipartisan recall campaign — is unlike any threat they’ve ever faced. Cordovans are especially worried about cuts to the ferry system, their highway to the outside world.,, “This is a dismantling of our state: economically, emotionally, morally,” said Rep. Louise Stutes, a Republican who represents parts of south-central Alaska, including Cordova. “It’s unreal. It’s just stinking unreal.” >click to read< 10:15

Legislative Update: Amended budget is just a start for ferry service – By Rep. Louise Stutes – >click to read< 

Declined for Alaska Board of Fisheries, Karl Johnstone says Legislature made a mistake

An allegation levied on the floor of the Alaska Legislature has opened old arguments about due process in cases of accused sexual harassment and misconduct. Last week, lawmakers meeting in joint session rejected Gov. Mike Dunleavy’s selection of Karl Johnstone for the Alaska Board of Fisheries. The rejection came after Rep. Ivy Spohnholz, D-Anchorage, said she had been contacted by two women who said Johnstone made “inappropriate and unwelcome sexual comments” to them while previously serving on the board.,, “There’s no truth to it at all. Zero truth,” Johnstone said Tuesday by phone. >click to read<20:01

Alaska fishing communities would take hit under Dunleavy proposal to end fish tax revenue-sharing

Gov. Mike Dunleavy proposed legislation this week that would keep commercial fish tax revenue that has for years been shared with Alaska fishing communities in the state’s coffers instead, a move that mayors in some of those cities say would be devastating.At play are two taxes: Alaska’s fisheries business tax, and the fishery resource landing tax. Dunleavy’s legislation would repeal the fisheries business tax allocation to municipalities and repeal revenue sharing for the fishery resource landing tax. Those shared funds go to local governments in communities where fish processing and landings occur. >click to read<22:53