Tag Archives: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council

Alabama Red Snapper Reporting System – Snapper checks show fear of exceeding quota unfounded

Preliminary numbers from the Alabama Red Snapper Reporting System, aka Snapper Check, indicate the fear that Alabama anglers would exceed the 2017 quota were unfounded. “Using the Alabama Snapper Check numbers, we’re going to be well within the historic allocation for Alabama, so the 39-day season did not put us over, which was a concern for the commercial fishing community and part of the charter fishing community,” said Scott Bannon, Acting Director of the Alabama Marine Resources Division (MRD). “Now the concern we have is what the MRIP (Marine Recreational Information Program) numbers will show, and those numbers are not out yet.” click here to read the story 09:11

Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council meeting in San Antonio, Tx. August 7 – 10, 2017

The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will meet at the Marriott Plaza, San Antonio, located at 555 S. Alamo St. San Antonio, Texas. The meeting will convene on the following days and local times: Council Committees meet 10:30 – 5:00 on Monday. Council Committees meet 8:30 – 5:00 on Tuesday. Council Committees meet 8:30 – 10:30 on Wednesday. Full Council meets 10:45 – 5:30 on Wednesday. Full Council meets 8:30 – 3:45 on Thursday  Read the Committee and Council Agenda, Click here Register to listen live  click here   www.gulfcouncil.org 13:59

Conflicts of Interest Plague Fishery Councils

In a tremendous display of arrogance, Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council member David Walker of Alabama went on a rant at the June meeting of the Gulf Council in which he proclaimed that millionaire shareholders like himself are the only ones who contribute anything to the red snapper fishery. He was referring to the paltry 3 percent administrative fee that shareholders are required to pay to cover the expense of the catch share program that has made him rich. The fact that NOAA Fisheries acknowledges the fee doesn’t even cover the cost of the program (the shortfall is picked up by taxpayers like you and me) did not deter Walker from his outlandish claims. He went on to challenge recreational anglers to show what they contribute.,, The end result of efforts by groups like the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) to privatize public marine resources was on full display at this meeting. They may not have intended it, but EDF and their allies have created an entire class of spoiled, entitled bullies, ready to intimidate anyone who threatens their domain, from Council members to Congressmen. Click here to read the story 14:35

Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council meeting in Naples, FL June 5 – 8, 2017

The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will meet June 5 – 8, 2017 at the Naples Grande Beach Resort 475 Seagate Drive Naples, FL 34103. The meeting will convene on the following days and local times: View Council Agenda View Briefing Materials, click here  Register for April Council Webinar, click here 12:32

Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council meeting April 3-6, 2017 in Burmingham

The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will meet April 3-6, 2017 at the Hyatt Regency Birmingham – The Winfrey Hotel, located at 1000 Riverchase Galleria, Birmingham, Alabama 35244. The meeting will convene on the following days and local times: View Council Agenda View Briefing Materials Register for April Council Webinar  19:31

HOOKED UP! PART II: Gulf Council chief talks about IFQ’s

The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council manages the fishery resources in the federal waters of the Gulf of Mexico. It’s one of eight regional fishery management councils in the United States.  The Gulf Council essentially manages the fishery from the nine-mile mark out to the 200-mile limit.  “Before the IFQ, we tried a variety of ways to address the race for fish that was taking place,” says Dr. Roy Crabtree, regional administrator for the Gulf Council. “We had a limited commercial quota for red snapper. The fishermen were catching it up as quick as they could. They were flooding the market with fish  Fishery was closed most of the year, so we didn’t have year-round production. And we had safety-at-sea issues. Because fishermen were fishing in unsafe sea conditions. And we were having overruns of quota. Crabtree says the IFQ program was designed largely to address these problems. The article continues here 18:00

COASTAL CONSERVATION ASSOCIATION v. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

Several private anglers and the Coastal Conservation Association, a group representing private anglers (collectively, CCA), appeal the district court’s summary judgment dismissal of their lawsuit, which challenged Amendment 40 to the Reef Fish Fishery Management Plan and the Final Rule implementing that amendment. Because we find that Amendment 40 is consistent with its organic statute and was properly devised and implemented, we AFFIRM the judgment of the district court. This dispute centers on the management of the red snapper fishery in the Gulf of Mexico. Read the complaint here 09:28

Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council meeting in Biloxi, MS, October 17 – 21, 2016

Gulf-of-Mexico-Fishery-Management-Council-logoThe Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will meet at the IP Casino & Resort, 850 Bayview Avenue, Biloxi, MS. 39530 Ballroom B, October 17- 20, 2016. View Agenda here View Briefing Book here Register for Webinar here Register for the Post Council Wrap-up Webinar here 18:00

Gulf council seeks input from fishermen for coral reef protections

coral_cover_photoFishermen will be able to provide input for coral protection areas in the at a workshop Monday hosted by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council. The meeting will be at 6 p.m. at the Courtyard by Marriott, 142 Library Drive, Houma. The council’s scientists recommended protecting 47 areas in the Gulf, but with the help of the Coral Advisory Panel and Shrimp Advisory Panel, the number has been narrowed to 15 priority areas. The meeting is to get feedback from fishermen who use bottom-contacting gear in federal waters in the Gulf before the council begins its public scoping process. Another meeting is to be held in Alabama. “Most of the areas, no one fishes in, but there is one area off the boot of Louisiana and several off Texas and Florida where there is some fishing activity. They want to get feedback from fishermen to see how much impact it would have to fisheries,” said Julie Falgout, seafood industry liaison with Louisiana SeaGrant. Read the rest here 11:08

Charlie Melancon’s Department Of Wrongdoing And Falsehood

charlie-melanconHave you been paying attention to the chaos at hand with the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries? It appears that there is a full three-ring circus going on with DWF and its secretary, the former Democrat congressman Charlie Melancon. And after eight months on the job it’s pretty clear that perception among the in-the-know crowd was largely correct. The department is awash in controversy, if not criminality, and those affected by it are furious. To full explain this, we should go back several years to a program set up at the federal level. The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, which is a federal commission set up to govern offshore fishing in the five Gulf states (Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas), and the National Marine Fisheries Service set up something called the Individual Fishing Quota system, or IFQ, to govern commercial fishing for red snapper. Meaning, the federal government resorted to crony capitalism as a means to govern Gulf red snapper fisheries. If you were a big player in the red snapper harvest before the program got started, you were one of the cronies and your incumbency would be protected.  Read the story here. 19:20

Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council August Meeting Review

Gulf-of-Mexico-Fishery-Management-Council-logo

The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council met in New Orleans, Louisiana, August 15 – 18, 2016. The Council welcomed its newest member Dr. Thomas Frazer, Director of the School of Natural Resources and Environment for the University of Florida.  In addition, Douglas Boyd (TX) and Leann Bosarge (MS) were each sworn in for an additional 3-year term. The Council elected Leann Bosarge as Council Chair and Johnny Greene as Council Vice Chair for the upcoming year. Issues in this update include – Data Collection – Coral and Habitat Protection – Modifications to the Commercial Individual Fishing Quota Programs – Gray Triggerfish – Federal Reef Fish Headboat Survey Vessel Management – Red Snapper Management for Federally Permitted Charter Vessels – Mackerel – Council Wrap-Up Webinar – The Council will host a webinar to review the Council meeting. Please join us at 6 p.m. ESTWednesday, August 24 for a quick presentation followed by a question and answer session. Register for the webinar here:  To read the details, Click here 15:52

Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council meeting August 15 – 18, 2016, New Orleans, LA

Gulf-of-Mexico-Fishery-Management-Council-logoThe Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will meet August 15 – 18, 2016, at the Astor Crowne Plaza hotel in New Orleans, LA.  Committee meetings will convene Monday at 8:30 am and conclude at 11:00 am Wednesday. The full Council will convene Wednesday morning beginning at 11:15 am. The Council is expected to adjourn by 4:15 pm Thursday. Committees & Council Agenda Click here .   Public comment is scheduled Wednesday from 2:00 pm to 5:00 pm. Testimony will be taken on the following: • Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary Draft Environmental Impact Statement • Open testimony on any other fishery issues or concerns  Council meetings are open to the public and are broadcast live over the internet. Register for the webinar Click here 20:48

Opinion: Red Snapper recreational fishermen— Allow Reallocation Among Fishermen, want shift to state management

redsnapperMany Gulf Coast anglers have been asking themselves what the world is coming to lately, when they can fish federal waters for red snapper for only a few days this year while commercial boats can take sport fishermen out anytime to catch snapper for the boat to sell. I sure wondered how that could be when, in April, I first heard about Texas captain Scott Hickman’s trips,” which — quite legally — allow him to take sport fishermen along to fill his fish boxes per the commercial catch shares he owns. He accepts no payment from these anglers, just as by law he can accept no tips. The anglers cannot legally keep any fish nor buy fish from Hickman. But they can buy fish caught that day from the fish house back at the dock — for a premium price (at least a few bucks more per pound than the usual market price). At first, this scheme seemed outrageous to me, as it apparently did to many in the recreational-fishing community. Then I started trying to put my finger on why it pissed me off, and mostly I came up with reasons why it shouldn’t, especially when considered within the context of our bizarro snapper-management regime. Read the rest here 10:30

Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council meeting in Austin, TX. April 4 – 7, 2016 Listen Live

GMFMC SidebarThe Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will meet in Austin at the Doubletree by Hilton Austin April 4 – 7, 2016. Read the Committee and Council Agenda, Click here Read the briefing material, Click here, Register here to listen live http://gulfcouncil.org/index.php 16:12

Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council meeting January 25 – 28, 2016 in Orange Beach, Alabama

GMFMC SidebarThe Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will meet January 25 – 28, 2016, at the Perdido Beach Resort in Orange Beach, Alabama. Committee meetings will convene Monday at 8:30 am, concluding at 10:30 am Wednesday. The full Council will convene Wednesday morning beginning at 10:45 am. The Council is expected to adjourn by 4:00 pm Thursday. Council meetings are open to the public and are broadcast live over the internet. To register for the webinar, click here   Read the agenda here 12:57

RECREATIONAL DATA TAKEN HOSTAGE BY GULF SNAPPER ANGLERS

redsnapperIf you pay any attention to fishery management issues (and if you’re reading this blog, it’s pretty clear that you do), you know that one of the most contentious issues, which comes up year after year, is the estimate of recreational landings. Commercial landings are pretty easy to measure, because commercial fishermen, as well as the processors and packing houses that purchase their products, are generally required to report such landings on a timely basis. To be sure, there are holes in the process.  But when it comes to recreational landings, it’s not that easy.  There are thousands of commercial fishermen on the coast; there are millions of anglers. Read the post here 14:10

Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council meeting in Galveston, TX October 5 – 8, 2015 Listen Live!

GMFMC SidebarThe public is invited to attend the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council meeting at the Hilton Galveston Island 5400 Seawall Boulevard
Galveston, TX . Read the Committee and Council Agenda, Click here Read the briefing material, Click here, Register here to listen live 19:05

Sport fishermen win greater share of red snapper catch

On Thursday, the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council increased the share of the catch going to recreational fishermen — made up of charter boats and non-commercial anglers. The council met in New Orleans. The change gives recreational fishermen 51.5 percent of the total catch and commercial fishermen 48.5 percent. Currently the catch is split 50-50. The change needs the approval of the U.S. Commerce Department. Commercial fishermen opposed giving recreational fishermen a greater share and said the shift would keep red snapper off the tables of restaurants. Read the rest here 19:31

Red Snapper: management of a public resource gone completely haywire. And we’re paying to have this done to us.

NOAA ScientistIt’s important to note here that the total allowable take isn’t based solely on the feds’ vague guesswork on the number of landings. No, they add in what they believe to be the discard mortality rates — that of fish released and dying sometime later, predominately because of barotrauma. That occurs to differing extents when fish are brought up from depths and their air bladders expand too quickly — and don’t return to normal quickly enough when released. The federal scientists use a number to determine how often this happens. In the case of snapper, they speculate that 40 percent of all released fish die in the recreational sector and 60 percent in the commercial sector. Read the rest here 09:33

Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council meeting in Key West, June 8 thru 12, 2015 Listen Live!

GMFMC SidebarThe public is invited to attend the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council meeting at the Marriot Beachside in  Key West. Read the Committee and Council Agenda, Click here Read the briefing material, Click here,  Joint Gulf/South Atlantic Council Meeting Agenda  Register here to listen live Kick off, 08:30 21:37

Red snapper season dates finalized

Last week NOAA Fisheries published a rule implementing an increase to the commercial and recreational quotas for red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico through 2017. For 2015, the red snapper allowable catch is increasing from 11.0 million pounds whole weight to 14.3 million pounds. The commercial and recreational sector quotas will be based on the current 51 percent commercial and 49 percent recreational allocation. The commercial quota will increase to 7.29 million pounds the recreational quota will increase to 7.01 million pounds. Read the rest here 09:32

Public meeting on commercial red snapper catch share program Wednesday 6 PM

GMFMC SidebarThe Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will hold a scoping workshop in Panama City Wednesday night to discuss and collect comment on potential changes to the red snapper commercial individual fishing quota (IFQ) program, also known as a catch share program. Read the rest here 10:24

Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council’s spiny lobster review panel, Monday, Feb 9, 0:900

GMFMC SidebarOpen to the public in Key West, Florida, and accessible via webinar. Click here for information, and here to access webinar. 19:50

Macaluso: Recreational anglers demonized by Commercial Fishermen in GMFMC hearing

After listening to the testimony during Wednesday afternoon’s Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council’s public comment period, it’s clear, when it comes to red snapper, commercial fishing interests are determined to demonize recreational fishermen. Commercial fishermen talk about how a certain fishing segment “steals” fish from them, and there’s no veiling their comments that the “segment” refers to recreational fishermen. Read the rest here 07:49

Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council Meeting January 26 – 29, 2015, Point Clear, AL

GMFMC SidebarAgenda and Summary Documents, Commitees Agenda can be found here  Register for the meeting webinar here, and listen live. 15:55

Macaluso: Will new Congress take stance?

GMFMC SidebarUnless and until Congress changes the Magnuson-Stevens Fish Conservation and Management Act, the federal mandate with a long name, Gulf of Mexico recreational fishermen will continue to have their pockets picked. That’s because when it comes to the  management tactics and schemes, recreational fishermen have suffered far more than the commercial side. Read the rest here 09:56

Fishermen want larger limit for mackerel – Council wants Catch Shares as a condition

In order to get the increase in trip limits, the fishermen may have to go along with a fishery management practice they have long opposed — catch shares. The Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association has staunchly opposed catch shares, arguing they are running smaller mom-and-pop fishermen out of business and giving greater allocations to large commercial fleets. They also create a market for people selling their allocations to the highest bidder. Read the rest here 09:03

Gulf Council votes 10-7 in favor of Amendment 40 – 75 percent of gulf red snapper fishery would go to private businesses forever

GMFMC SidebarThursday’s 10-7 vote by the Gulf Council favors a document referred to as Amendment 40, which would create rules for anglers fishing from charter boats that would be separate and different from rules that regulate anglers fishing from private boats for snapper in the Gulf of Mexico. Read the rest here 20:29

Charter Captains on Red Snapper Regulation

GMFMC SidebarThe  has been hearing from the public today regarding management issues for red snapper. . The public hearing was held at the Battle House Hotel. Right now, charter companies are held under the same rules and regulations as private recreational fisherman. Video, Read more here 08:04

Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council Meeting October 20 – 24, 2014 in Mobile, Alabama

GMFMC SidebarClick here to view the Committees Agenda – Click here to view the Council Agenda – Click here to watch the meetings live 14:43