Tag Archives: heritage

Help us learn more about the “Michigan Bears” and the men who fished aboard Gloucester’s oldest fishing vessel, the Phyllis A.

On September 6, 1920 five small vessels arrived in Gloucester Harbor and tied up in Smith Cove near Rocky Neck. The little boats and the 20 men who crewed them, had spent 24 days traveling 2,200 miles from Charlevoix, Michigan to start a new life for them selves and their families, doing a method of fishing that had been introduced, but not welcomed, by the fishing industry on the east coast of the Atlantic in the late 1800’s,,, gill net fishing, used here in Gloucester and the East coast to this day. >click to read<21:21

Inuit father faces backlash after posting photo of son with hunted beluga whale on Twitter

An Inuit father who posted a photo on Twitter expressing pride in his son’s first beluga whale harvest says he’s received a lot of online backlash from people who don’t understand life in the North. When someone harvests a whale in Rankin Inlet it’s a celebration for the whole community, said Albert Netser. But it’s more special when it happens for the first time. So when his 16-year-old son Nangaat harpooned a beluga whale earlier this week in the Hudson Bay, like any proud parent, he wanted to share the achievement. He shared the photo, showing his son proudly smiling standing on rocks at the edge of the water in front of the dead whale,,, >click to read<22:39

Sen. Charlie Albertson: Preserving Waterfront Access in NC

Senator Charlie Albertson was interviewed to explore his role in passing the Waterfront Access and Marine Industry Fund, which protected waterfront parcels of real estate for commercial and recreational uses. Senator Albertson explains he learned from his colleagues the value of protecting access for the commercial fishing industry and the value of North Carolina’s fish houses to the state’s coastal heritage, and how they all wanted to do something to help protect that heritage. Watch the video here 16:34

The Esther II: A father’s boat, a son’s heart

TREMONT –  Back in the 1940s and ‘50s, Charles Orville Trask used to set out from Bass Harbor and head 20 miles offshore to lobster fish and tub-trawl for hake around Mount Desert Rock, Great Duck Island, and Frenchboro. Trask used to be an assistant sales manager for Ditto, Inc., in Chicago, pre-photocopier. He was fairly successful, but had a bad spell after his first wife divorced him. He returned to Maine and married Esther Moore, a teacher who was born and raised on Gotts Island (and was a sister of famous Maine author Ruth Moore). [email protected]

Jarvis Newman, early fiberglass trend-setter

BDN – Newman recalls meeting Irona’s owner, Frank Cram. He convinced Cram to let him take a mold from the classy yacht, which was Bunker and Ellis’ 42nd boat, launched in 1964.“I said, ‘Look, if I take your boat for the winter, I’ll bring it back to you in the spring and I’ll pay for the storage, and I’ll completely take all the paint off the hull and repaint it for nothing,’” recalls Newman. “It was a very big win-win for him. It was a scary thought, taking a mold off a boat like that, because if it ever stuck – oooh, that would be a disaster.” continued