Tag Archives: International Council for the Exploration of the Sea

Everything you ever needed to know about fisheries

We are currently going through the most significant legislative reform of the past 40 years; exactly how this will impact fisheries is unclear. There may be much to gain but also… so much to lose. I am too young to remember the ‘cod wars’ between Iceland and the UK fishing fleet (1958-1976), however, throughout my time studying and working in fisheries and marine conservation these times have always struck a chord. They highlight to me the difficulties around managing fisheries and the ever present struggle that seems to exist between the social, economic and environmental issues of the industry. >click to read<19:36

Fisherman take a battering as sea bass to be taken off menus to save fish from extinction

sea-bass-610869The International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), the global advisory body on sustainable use of oceans, has advised the British Government there should be “zero catch” of sea bass in British waters around England, Wales and the Irish Sea in 2017. This includes both commercial and recreational fishing. A study by the council revealed sea bass stocks were at a high in 2010 but have been rapidly declining since then due to over-fishing and a subsequent reduction in reproduction. The EU has been making efforts to stop the decline of sea bass since the beginning of 2015 by banning deep sea trawling for the first three months of the year when the fish are in spawning season in the Channel, the Celtic Sea, Irish Sea and southern North Sea. Read the rest here 18:57

Good News for Fishermen in the Northeast Atlantic!

Today, the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) delivered an overview of the status of a host of fish and shellfish stocks across the Northeast Atlantic for which the organization has provided advice on this year. “Over the last ten to fifteen years, we have seen a general decline in fishing mortality in the Northeast Atlantic and the Baltic Sea,” explained Kirkegaard. “The stocks have reacted positively to the reduced exploitation and we’re observing growing trends in stock sizes for most of the commercially important stocks.” Read the rest here 19:24