Tag Archives: (International Fund for Animal Welfare)

Another North Atlantic right whale found dead on Cape Cod

Yet another North Atlantic right whale carcass has been discovered, the sixteenth confirmed death of the endangered species this year. The International Fund for Animal Welfare says the carcass was found on Nashawena Island, south of Cape Cod in Massachusetts. The animal welfare organization says the carcass was “very decomposed,” but it is working alongside the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to determine the cause of death. click here to read the story 09:47

Save our seal(er)s – Jim Winter, St. John’s

The population of harp seals off Canada’s East Coast is about 7.5 million. For over 50 years, marine mammal scientists have studied the herd, and from this science annual quotas are set. During this period, the herd has more than tripled in size. The seals we hunt are fully weaned and independent. Harp seal dames feed their offspring for 11 to 15 days and leave them; they are not helicopter parents. The use of anthropomorphic words like “baby” is merely heart-tugging propaganda. The only study portraying the killing as inhumane was paid for by the International Fund for Animal Welfare and conducted by a group of British vets and was never peer-reviewed, as is customary with studies of this kind. Every other study, including one by the International Veterinary Group, has found the hunt to operate as humanely as any slaughterhouse in the Western World. click here to read the letter 16:11

Extremist Anti Canadian seal hunt doc to be seen by Discovery’s millions of viewers

20160818_011004_huntwatch-webThe feature documentary Huntwatch, narrated by actor Ryan Reynolds and produced by the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), will be airing on Thursday, September 22 in the United States on Discovery Impact at 10 pm, and in Canada on Animal Planet at 11 pm ET. The film follows the history of IFAW’s campaign against Canada’s East Coast commercial harp seal hunt, highlighting the unwavering courage and determination of our founder, Brian Davies.  Blending never-before-seen archival footage with more recent interviews, the documentary reveals not only the cruelty and controversy that is commonly associated with the seal hunt, but also shows the beauty and majesty of harp seals in their natural environment, the historical importance of the hunt in eastern Canada, and the political machinations that allow it to continue today. Well. Cumbia! Read the rest here 10:27

The Only People Making Money Off the Seal Hunt Are Anti-Sealing Campaigners – Terry Audla

supereco manI understand that PETA brings in about $30 million annually, the Humane Society of the U.S. collects more than $100 million and their executives make six-figure salaries. They and other groups like the International Fund for Animal Welfare are clamouring for this easy target. Who could blame them? After all, it is good money in a competitive charitable market. huffpo  Read more here  17:29

With the seal population increased to about 8 million, protestors of the hunt should spend time considering the impact on the ecosystem.

If indeed the sceptics have lessened their stance on the cruelty of the seal hunt, then it is on to the sustainability argument, says the provincial fisheries minister. Keith Hutchings was reacting to recent comments made by Sheryl Fink, the International Fund for Animal Welfare’s wildlife campaign director, as she made a visit to Corner Brook this week. Read more here @westernstar  21:48

Fink forecasts end of seal industry

Sheryl Fink is forecasting the demise of the seal industry, but how that happens should be determined by Newfoundlanders and Labradorians.  “It’s not for a group like (International Fund for Animal Welfare) or Pam Anderson or anybody else to sort of provide the solution,” the wildlife campaigns director for IFAW Canada said during an interview at The Western Star in Corner Brook Tuesday. Read more here westernstar  09:46