Tag Archives: Labrador

Ice Assistance Emergency Program – $5M for iced-in fish harvesters, but FFAW says plant workers left out

A Liberal member of Parliament says the federal government has allocated up to $5 million to help fish harvesters who are stuck in port because of heavy ice. Gudie Hutchings, MP for Long Range Mountains, said Friday the money will come under the Ice Assistance Emergency Program for eligible applicants in Newfoundland and Labrador and in Quebec. Some fishermen have been without income for more than two months, as ice socked in the coastline. “Plant workers have been just as impacted by severe ice delays as fish harvesters. Leaving these people out of the income bridging program is unacceptable,” said FFAW president Keith Sullivan in a news release Friday evening.  click here to read the story 20:10

Last-in first-out policy squabble pits Nunavut and Labrador against Nova Scotia

800px-PandborealisindThere’s a danger that Nunavut’s already inadequate share of offshore shrimp quota could get even smaller if the Department of Fisheries and Oceans continues to apply its last in, first out approach to allocating shrimp quotas, Nunavut Senator Dennis Patterson said last week. “All Nunavut asks for is to be treated fairly and to have the terms of their constitutionally protected Nunavut land claim respected,” Patterson said. Patterson’s contribution to the campaign comes at a time when various entrenched interests, especially long-established fishing fleets in Nova Scotia, are fighting to hold on to their total allowable catch in the face of shrimp stocks that are declining because of climate change. “Last-in, first-out,” or “LIFO,” is a federal policy that’s been applied to the northern shrimp fishery since at least 1997. Read the rest here 17:36

LIFO policy: Newfoundland and Labrador will take a major hit if the inshore shrimp fishery collapses

Northern_Pink_Shrimp“In 2015, the inshore shrimp fishery contributed $250 million to the economy of rural Newfoundland and Labrador,” Phil Barnes said. “Economic hubs like Gander, Grand Falls-Windsor, Corner Brook and St. John’s all benefit from the inshore fishery. “Inshore harvesters buy vehicles, groceries, fuel, gear and repair services. Plant workers also spend their income at local businesses,” he said.  Barnes said the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) has to scrap its  “last in-first out” (LIFO) for the Northern shrimp fishery. “Our inshore fleet has access to one area (Area 6) for a few months of the year while the offshore trawlers are in multiple areas all year round,” he said. “Someone is always there and this has to stop. Read the story here 12:57

Report suggests snow crab in decline

canadian snow crabJamie Rose hopes the numbers are as wrong as he thinks they are. That was the St. Anthony fisherman’s reaction to a snow crab report that was recently released by the Canadian Science Advisory Secretariat. The annual report examined fishing areas 2HJ3KLNOP4R and it paints a bleak future for the upcoming season. The index-based report suggests exploitable biomass – large male crab – has declined to its lowest observed level in the last two decades of study, dropping from a highpoint of nearly 70 in the mid-‘90s to a all time low of around 10. Recruitment appears to have bottomed out. The index level is sitting around three points, which dropped from around 15 over the last five years. Read the rest here 11:26

Keith Sullivan – Leave scarce shrimp to the inshore fishery

The inshore owner-operator northern shrimp fishery, which is confined to the waters adjacent to the northeast coast of Newfoundland and south coast of Labrador, is being threatened with destruction as a result of poor management and a sharp decline in the stock. In 2015, the directly contributed approximately $250 million to the Newfoundland and Labrador economy. Much of this value originates in rural communities, paying wages to thousands of harvesters, processing workers and truck drivers, and providing profits to processing companies. Indirectly, the economy of the shrimp fishery keeps schools, businesses and municipalities sustainable. Read the rest here 09:41

Fishery the ‘economic giant’ of the province, says FFAW leader

Just weeks before Newfoundland and Labrador’s provincial election, the fisheries union is starting a campaign to promote rural issues.  The campaign is called Rural Works, and it is focused on the importance of the fishery to rural towns around the province. “The reason we were settled here is because of the fishery. The reason we remain here is because of the fishery,” said Fish, Food and Allied Workers president Keith Sullivan at a news conference Thursday.   “It remains a primary economic driver …worth over $1 billion to our province. We think it can be worth much more,” said Sullivan. Read the rest here 19:09

Newfoundland and Labrador Economy: Fishing on Solid Ground

cod-fishAmidst the recent volatility of oil and mineral production, the fishery has been a steadfast economic driver for Newfoundland and Labrador, particularly in rural areas. Many thought that the collapse of key groundfish stocks in the early 1990s was the death knell for rural Newfound- land and Labrador. Now, two decades later, even a trade as ancient as the fishery is showing that it’s capable of change in modern markets. “We fished mainly cod back then, but when the moratorium came on,,, Read the rest here 17:37

“It’s almost like a special run of crab.” Labrador crab fisherman ‘awestruck’ at size of this year’s catch

A Labrador crab fisherman says this season is shaping up to be the best he’s seen in over 20 years on the water. William Larkham Jr. fishes off the north coast near Makkovik and said he is amazed by the size of the crab being caught this season. “We’ve seen some big crab through the years, but nothing compared to what we are seeing this year,” he said. “You’re kind of awestruck, they’re that big,” he said. Video, Read the rest here 20:54

FFAW says Shrimp Quota Cuts Having Noticeable Impact on Communities

The FFAW admits the average person may not fully understand the impact cuts to shrimp quota could have on rural parts of the province. This year the inshore took a 27 per cent cut while the offshore only saw a three per cent quota reduction. Audio, Listen here 09:34