Tag Archives: lobster

Fishermen’s group grateful DFO lays charge stemming from lobster raid

A fishermen’s association is pleased to see the Department of Fisheries and Oceans lay a charge against the owner of lobster pound in southwest Nova Scotia who is accused of selling lobster caught under an Aboriginal communal fishing licence. Colin Sproul, vice-president of the Bay of Fundy Inshore Fishermen’s Association, said he’s grateful DFO is taking action this summer. “Last summer, there were an incredible amount of lobsters poached in southwest Nova Scotia,” Sproul said on Thursday. “They weren’t First Nations people poaching these lobsters. They were just being poached by poachers under the guise of the FSC [food, social and ceremonial] and sold. >click to read<10:28

Extremely rare white lobster turns up in Bantry Bay

The whole country may have spent the past month basking in sunshine and getting as red as the proverbial lobster but for west Cork fisherman Donagh O’Connor, the warm weather has brought a rather more unusual example of the species: a very rare white lobster. The whole country may have spent the past month basking in sunshine and getting as red as the proverbial lobster but for west Cork fisherman Donagh O’Connor, the warm weather has brought a rather more unusual example of the species: a very rare white lobster. >click to read<11:47

The secret life of lobster (trade): Could we be in hot water?

In a paper published in Frontiers in Marine Science, researchers, including lead author Joshua Stoll of the University of Maine School of Marine Sciences and the Mitchell Center for Sustainability Solutions, map the global trade routes for lobster and quantify the effect they have on obscuring the relation between those who catch the valuable crustacean and those who ultimately eat it. The team’s findings indicate that in today’s hyper-connected world, a growing number of nations are acting as “middlemen” in the supply chain. This makes it increasingly difficult to trace where seafood goes and difficult to anticipate changes in market demand. >click to read<10:30

Lobster-Hauling off Maine Becoming a Less Popular Livelihood

Chipper Zeiner has been hauling American lobsters off the East Coast of the United States since 1973, when he was just 11 years old, but in recent years he has noticed a decline in the number of people taking up the practice to earn a living. Chipper, who has about 600 pots in various sections of the waters off the coast of Maine, heads out into the Atlantic Ocean at 6 am six days a week, hauling in about 200 lobsters each day. “You have to love it to do it. If you don’t love it you won’t be doing it for long. Many kids today won’t do it, it costs too much to get into it,” Chipper said. >click to read<, video, photo’s, >click here<08:39

Florida Keys fishermen talk impact of President Trump’s tariffs

Jeff Cramer is a longtime Keys commercial fisherman who operates a fish house in Marathon. He buys lobster from as many as 20 different boat captains and then sells them all to his Chinese buyer. “I’m just hoping our president can resolve this little trade war he’s got going with Europe and China. A lot of us voted for him and maybe this will work out in the long run, but for the short term, it’s really going to devastate us after we had that hurricane last year. A lot of guys are living off the SBA loans that they have to start paying back in a little bit,” Cramer said. “Let’s see what happens. He got Rocket Man to back down, let’s see if he can get the Chinese president to back down,” Cramer added. Gary Nichols also voted for Trump and is standing by him. >click to read<11:44

He’s not shellfish: N.L. fisherman gets catch of a lifetime, and lets it go

Most fish harvesters like to keep what they catch, but a fisherman in the Bay of Islands decided it was his patriotic duty to let one particularly impressive catch go. Reg MacDonald of Summerside caught an unusual lobster in late June — one bigger and older than most he’s seen in his traps over his four decades on the water.,,, MacDonald couldn’t be sure exactly how old the lobster was, but he estimated it at around 140 years of age. After fishing for 45 years, MacDonald has learned that the darker the colour of the shell, the older the lobster, as it’s an indication that the lobster hasn’t molted in a number of years. >click to read<10:34

Forget Lobster: The Scallop Is the Real Seafood King

When I tell people that I’m a part-time resident of Maine, I often get an enthusiastic, “Wow, you must get sick of lobster.” And, yes, it’s true. I do get sick of lobster. But not from eating too much. I get sick of lobster cultists, that roving band of hard-shelled Hare Krishnas who loudly express devotion to the crustacean as they wander the Maine coast in search of shrines they call “pounds.”,,,   The central tragedy of their endless rovings is the long and pernicious shadow they cast over the region’s true and absolute delicacy. I am talking, of course, about big, flavorful sea scallops, which are the north’s bona fide maritime royalty.,,, Fundy scallops are massive; some are the size of filet mignons. Often, two or three scallops per person are enough for dinner. >click to read<12:56

Marshfield lobsterman ‘living the dream’

Pregnant female: toss. Notch in the fin: toss. Jonah crab: toss. Legal lobster: Keep.  Shell smaller than 3¼ inches: toss. Shell hasn’t hardened after molting: toss. This is the sorting method lobsterman Steve Carver follows as he pulls in his lobster traps — 200 per day — in Green Harbor. He can have up to 20 lobsters in a trap and throw all of them back into the water to comply with fishing regulations. And that’s only part of what makes lobster fishing a brutal profession. “We redefine ‘tired,’” Carver, 46, of Marshfield, said on a recent Thursday out on the water. “It takes a certain kind of person. All in all, it’s just a lot of hard work. I don’t see how you could do it if you didn’t love it.” Photo gallery >click to read<10:04

New DFO orders ‘hard pill to swallow’ for N.B. lobster fishermen

Lobster fishermen off the coast of Miscou Island, N.B., will spend Sunday morning hauling gear from the waters in order to comply with the latest fishing zone closures imposed by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. On Friday afternoon, the DFO re-opened four areas previously closed to fishing due to the presence of right whales. But with more closures being imposed on Sunday, frustrations continue to mount. Carl Allen, president of the Maritime Fishermen’s Union, organized the most recent protest and met with LeBlanc on Friday.,,”I have a lot of respect for Minister LeBlanc, but we just don’t agree with the basis of the whole plan — it’s a hard pill to swallow,” he said.,, LeBlanc did offer the fishermen an alternative, however. He offered a paid training program for crew members and plant workers affected by these closures. >click to read<18:20

LeBlanc offers fall season to fishermen squeezed by right whale measures

The federal fisheries minister says he has offered lobster harvesters from New Brunswick and Quebec a previously unscheduled fall fishing season, to make up for measures aimed at protecting endangered right whales. Dominic LeBlanc said he told the Maritime Fishermen’s Union that he plans to open a harvesting zone in the last half of September because of the 15-day closure of a 1,400-square-kilometre portion of ocean that begins Sunday. LeBlanc said the offer will go to about 62 fishing vessels in New Brunswick and 60 from the Gaspe Peninsula whose lobster harvest will be largely shut down as the whales pass through. >click to read<18:45

Forget Maine, Jersey fisherman catch quality lobsters

As the sun begins to set over Shark River, the boat “Fully Loaded” approaches the dock. As the name suggests, it’s fully loaded with lobsters. “It’s like gold mining. When you come in with the boxes full, it’s gold,” said Joe Horvath, co-owner of Jersey Shore Lobster Brothers. It’s a family business for Joey and Adam Horvath. How do they catch the lobsters? “Well, people think you just throw a trap out there and get them like a crab, but they’re totally not like a crab. You have to go out, you have to find what water depth they’re in, you have to find where they’re at. At certain times of the season they’re shallower, they’re deeper,” said Joey. >click to read<11:59

Book questions Maine lobster fishery’s future

Author Christopher White will explore Maine’s lobster industry at an author talk and book signing for “The Last Lobster: Boom or Bust for Maine’s Greatest Fishery?” at the Jesup Memorial Library on Thursday, June 21, at 7 p.m. In the last five years, Maine lobstermen have annually caught more than 120 million pounds, six times what was caught annually in the 1980s.,,, Over the course of a year, White followed three lobster captains — Frank, Jason and Julie — as they hauled and set thousands of traps off the coast of Stonington and fought a warming ocean, volatile prices and rough weather to keep their livelihood afloat. >click to read< 11:39

MLA says P.E.I. fishermen getting around $5 per pound for lobster

Souris-Elmira MLA Colin LaVie wants to know what the provincial government is doing to help increase lobster prices. During Thursday’s question period, LaVie, who is also a fisherman, raised the issue of lobster prices he said were as low as $5-$5.50 per pound. “Do you consider that a good price for lobsters?” The spring lobster season has been underway for more than a month and the P.E.I. Fisherman’s Association raised similar concerns about prices last month. >click to read<08:11

Bearfoot Bistro cutting out the middle man this lobster season

Lynn Albert still remembers when lobster didn’t have quite the same cache as it does today. “I remember when I was in school and very young, (some underprivileged students) would bring lobster in their lunchbox and we would eat bologna,” said Albert, 50, president of La Renaissance des Iles de la Madeleine, a seafood supplier based on the small Quebecois archipelago in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. It’s safe to say lobster has enjoyed a renaissance since those days, and especially the lobster of the Magdalen Islands, known for its high quality and distinct flavour. >click to read<19:26

Fisheries minister casts line to Ottawa for lobster poaching task force

Fisheries Minister Keith Colwell says he’s “very concerned” about the possibility of violence related to lobster poaching in southwest Nova Scotia and he’s proposing an idea he says worked in the past. Last week, representatives from several lobster associations raised the issue of poaching on the eve of the season’s close, saying they feared an escalation of tensions that last year saw several boats set on fire and threats exchanged between fishermen. >click to read<14:29

Suffocating lobster: Licence suspended for Quin-Sea operation in Southern Harbour

Seafood inspectors with the provincial fisheries department converged on the Quin-Sea Fisheries operation Tuesday, fastening yellow caution tape to the wharf with the words “under detention” in black letters. Tethered just outside the wharf and floating on the surface were more then 100 plastic crates, each capable of handling up to 100 pounds of live lobster. Sources say thousands of pounds of lobster have died recently at the site because of what was described as an “overcrowding” of lobster stored in a nearby holding pen. >click to read<17:23

Lobster processing bill OK’d by Mass State Senate

“Massachusetts has the second largest lobster catch in the country,” Tarr said in a statement. “To keep from being left behind, we should expand our ability to process raw and frozen lobster parts. American lobsters are being harvested here and should be prepared for market here instead of Canada or Maine.” The expansion of allowed processing practices, according to Tarr, would enhance local economies in Massachusetts coastal communities such as Gloucester, which is the state’s most lucrative lobster port, and provide local restaurants and food stores with “superior access to the best lobster parts for their customers.” >click to read<19:26

Trawl limit plan divides lobstermen at hearing

A Department of Marine Resources proposal to change the way some lobstermen fish in a large swath of water around Mount Desert Rock drew vocal opposition at a meeting in Ellsworth May 22 despite a unanimous vote in the Zone B Lobster Management Council. At issue is a proposal to limit the number of traps that can be linked together in a single “trawl” in an area of about 300 square miles. The roughly rectangular area in waters that are part of Lobster Management Zone B stretches about 10 miles seawards from a line drawn six miles off the coast that extends roughly between Schoodic Point in the east and the southern end of Marshall Island in the west. >click to read<11:54

P.E.I. lobster buyers vote to suspend collecting lobster levy

Island lobster buyers are not collecting the one cent per pound levy this year, but fishermen will continue to pay theirs. P.E.I. was the first province in the region to introduce the two cent levy in 2016. The levy took one cent per pound from Island fishermen for lobster they brought in and another cent per pound from the buyers. The money was used for marketing lobster products with the fishermen’s levy going toward the Lobster Fishers Marketing Board and the buyer’s share to the P.E.I. Lobster Marketing Authority Inc. Francis Morrissey, former acting president of the P.E.I. Lobster Marketing Authority Inc., said buyers voted earlier this year to suspend collecting the levy in 2018. >click to read<22:53

Turf War: Cooler heads need to prevail in Lobster disputes

One thing’s for certain — things need to calm down, and soon, in an escalating dispute between two area families that’s already resulted in charges being laid for assault causing bodily harm, mischief causing danger to life (after a ramming at sea) and uttering threats. There have also been allegations of an attempted ramming and anonymous telephoned death threats. A DFO vessel and the coast guard were off Ecum Secum on Thursday in response to “civil disobedience and local unrest,” a DFO spokesman said. No trouble was reported that day.  >click to read<12:01

South Shore lobstermen finally put traps in water

South Shore lobstermen are back on the water this week after more than a three month ban on lobster fishing, aimed at protecting endangered whales. The ban was supposed to be from Feb. 1 to April 30, but an additional two weeks was added because whales were spotted close to the shore last month. In all, local lobstermen have gone 15 weeks without pulling a trap or making a sale. “We’re going into the season broke, let’s put it that way,” fisherman Dana Blackman said Wednesday morning, the day after lobster fishing resumed.,, The ban affects about 75 lobster boats in Marshfield and Scituate alone. >click to read<17:46

Court dismissal ends lobster dealer’s potboiler

A saga involving allegations of skullduggery by a Mount Desert Island lobster dealer on the waters of Blue Hill Bay reached its final chapter last week in Ellsworth. A Superior Court judge dismissed a single charge against Donald Crabtree of failing to keep required records or not reporting all of his lobster purchases. The story began in the summer of 2015 with an investigation by Maine Marine Patrol officers who had heard complaints that Crabtree was buying lobsters on a barge moored outside Seal Cove in Blue Hill Bay but wasn’t filing the required landings reports with the Department of Marine Resources. >click to read< 11:39

Injunction sought against lobster buoy lines

On Friday, Richard Maximus Strahan filed the emergency motion in U.S. District Court for a temporary restraining order to stop either the licensing or deploying of vertical bouy lines, arguing they routinely entangle the endangered whales, causing serious injury and death. The restraining order should be in effect until marine fisheries officials and the Massachusetts Lobstermen’s Association could show there are no more right whales, a migratory species, in the states coastal waters, according to the motion. >click to read< 08:58

Lobster prices high, but dropping as summer approaches

Lobster prices are high in the U.S. right now, but members of the industry expect them to come down soon as the Canadian catch creeps up and America’s summer haul gets going. One-pound lobsters, which Mainers call “chicks,” are selling for about $12 per pound to consumers, which is a couple of dollars per pound more than six months ago. The U.S. lobster industry, based heavily in Maine, is in a slow mode as fishermen get ready to pull traps in the summer. >click to read<13:10

Fishing lobster aboard the Jaxton Brock in the Northumberland Strait

The piercing sound of a winch shattered the predawn ocean calm as a yellow trap was hauled up from the Northumberland Strait’s pitch-black waters onto the Jaxton Brock’s deck at about 4:20 a.m. It was the first catch of many on Wednesday and inside the traps were a true Pictou County delicacy: lobsters..,, The Jaxton Brock is a brand-new vessel that still smells of fresh paint and is named for Warren and Suzanne’s grandson, expected later this year. Warren was proud of their boat’s performance. “It turns on a dime,” he said. >click to read<10:10

Right whale rules trap fishermen

The federal government’s decision to extend rules protecting right whales to P.E.I.’s lobster fishermen sent waves of anxiety through the industry last week. The fishermen were reacting not only to the poor timing of the decision — coming just days before the lobster season’s opening on May 1 — but, more urgently, the prospect that their livelihood may dwindle if a right whale is spotted near a fishing vessel. Of course, the reasoning for these federal measures isn’t really at issue — no one is saying right whales shouldn’t be protected. >click to read<09:53

Lobster fishermen rescued after boat hung up on sandbar in western P.E.I.

Northeast winds and low tides made setting day a challenge for some lobster fishermen on P.E.I. Monday. A fisherman and four crew had to be rescued in Hardy’s Channel in western P.E.I. at around 11 a.m. when their boat got hung up on a sandbar and water started coming in, according to Lloyd Phillips, the president of the Hardy’s Channel Fish Co-op. And at Covehead Harbour, fishermen said about half a dozen boats ended up docking in Rustico because a sandbar prevented them from getting back into Covehead. >click to read<23:13

Fishermen prepare for lobster season

Warren Francis and his family were in high spirits as they readied their brand-new fishing boat at Pictou Landing’s wharf under a sunny spring sky for the upcoming lobster season starting next Monday.,, But fisherman Ronnie Heighton, who sits on the Gulf of Nova Scotia Fleet Planning Board, said that fishermen plying the Northumberland Strait for catches can “live quite happily.” “There’s never a bad day when you fish lobster,”,, However, Heighton states that danger lies ahead for fishermen who rely on the Strait for their livelihoods.>click to read<12:00

New rules sprung on lobster fishermen to protect whales

Parts of the water off the coast of New Brunswick will be closed to lobster fishing this season to protect the North Atlantic right whale, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans has told lobster fishermen.,, But Tuesday’s notice reveals many of the same measures announced in late March for the crab fishery will be applied to lobster fishing in the gulf as well. Lobster fishermen reacted with surprise and disappointment and suggested the new rules were mostly about the federal department’s public image. >click to read<17:48

Debt, determination and hope mingle during dumping day in Larrys River

“To hell with it, let ’er go,” Damien Delorey called back from the wheelhouse. At his command, Robert Hart threw the buoy, waited for the water to draw it taut, and then shoved the trap over. “You’ll never learn if you never try,” the captain murmured quietly to himself. For reasons only he understands, the handful of traps he dumped at this nameless point in the water a few kilometres off Larrys River are a bigger gamble than the rest of the 250 he and his crew set on Thursday. >click to read<08:03