Tag Archives: maine

It’s tough being a seafood lover living in landlocked central Pennsylvania.

Shaun Knight and Christa Stofferahn are changing all that. In August 2017, they opened Maine Bay & Berry, and since then, Knight has been making the 12-hour trek to Maine three or four times each month to bring back fresh seafood straight from New England to State College. How fresh is it? “I literally go onto the boat and pull the lobsters out of the water myself,” Knight says. Born and raised in Winter Harbor, Maine, Knight taught in the Smeal College of Business at Penn State for 15 years. During that time, he would bring back seafood for his colleagues whenever he went back to visit family in Maine.,,, “Christa has always told me I should be doing this as a business.”>click to read<18:40

Maine lobster catch dips to lowest level in 6 years in ’17

The state that dominates the U.S. lobster haul saw the catch fall to its lowest level since 2011 last year, yet the industry is still strong and the crustaceans remain easily available to consumers, regulators said Friday. Maine fishermen caught a little more than 110.8 million pounds (50.3 million kilograms) of lobster last year, following a stretch of five consecutive years in which the state topped 120 million pounds (54 million kilograms) annually, the state Department of Marine Resources announced. Fishermen in Maine, who typically catch about 80 percent of America’s lobster, also made slightly less money. >click to read< 09:57

“The Bomb Cyclone Storm” (explosive cyclogenesis) – Its a Mess Everywhere!

Gloucester – Water and whiteouts: Homes, businesses flooded; thousands without powerclick here00:41

New Bedford – Carlos Rafael continues to give Feds headaches as boat breaks freeclick here

Maine – Storm triggers Maine’s worst tidal flooding since historic Blizzard of 1978click here

PHOTOS: Massachusetts Flooding During Blizzard 2018click here

New Hampshire – Bomb Cyclone Pounds Seacoastclick here

Nova Scotia – Powerful storm surge rips up roads as it slams into Nova Scotia coastclick here

Maine Elver lottery gets under way Wednesday

For the first time in more than four years, a few new Maine residents will get a chance to participate in the elver fishery. On Wednesday, the Department of Marine Resources will open a lottery for at least seven new licenses to be issued for the 2018 elver fishery. The season begins on March 22. Each new license holder will be allotted a minimum of 4 pounds of the state’s aggregate elver quota. Based on the average price for the 2017 season that ended in June, that would be worth some $6,000. click here to read the story, details, and good luck! 17:18

Maine lobster catch on track to hit lowest value this decade

Maine’s 2017 lobster harvest is on pace to hit its lowest value this decade, due to an unfavorable combination of a dwindling catch and falling prices, according to lobster industry officials. The statewide haul for this year could plummet below 100 million pounds for the first time since 2010 — a decrease of more than 30 million pounds from 2016, said David Cousens, president of Maine Lobstermen’s Association. “This year we’re having is one of the worst we’ve had” in recent memory, Cousens said.  click here to read the story 08:19

First half of Maine’s lobstering season ‘painfully slow’ for fishermen

A cold spring, high bait prices and a stormy summer are adding up to a slow lobstering season in Maine. Every fisherman and every lobstering port along Maine’s 3,500-mile coastline is different. But as of Oct. 1, the midpoint in the industry’s peak season, most Maine lobstermen and the dealers who buy from them agree the catch is down. They disagree on whether the industry will be able to land enough lobster to recover and keep up with the last few years of record harvests. click here to read the story 07:46

Years of high lobster landings spark resurgence in Maine’s boat building industry

A lobsterman’s biggest expense is the boat. Analysts say Maine’s boat-building industry has made a remarkable recovery since it bottomed out during the Great Recession of 2008, when many of the state’s boat builders, including Young Brothers Boats of Corea, decided to get out of the business. Inside Mike Light’s boat shop in Steuben, a 44-foot Calvin Beal lobster boat is getting a major face-lift that its owner hopes will keep him fishing for another 6-10 years. The seas take a toll on these hardworking vessels, and when the time comes for repairs, Light says, some fishermen are choosing to upgrade. click here to read the story 21:00

Police identify body found in Portland Harbor, investigating circumstances of death

Portland police have identified the body found Thursday morning in Portland Harbor as that of Paul J. Kirchhoff, a Portland fisherman. The state medical examiner’s office determined that Kirchhoff, 42, died from drowning, with no other source of physical trauma, according to Martin. Kirchhoff’s body was found in the water near Long Wharf.,,, Anyone with information about Kirchhoff’s final hours is encouraged to call the Portland police at (207) 874-8575. click here to read the story 09:27

Racing the past in Jonesport, Maine: 5 days aboard the world’s fastest lobster boats

The lobstermen who make up this strange party compete all summer long on a race circuit that takes them and their boats to 11 fishing communities up and down the Maine coast. A 26-foot boat really only needs a 250-horsepower engine, but in order to race, lobstermen and women trick out boats of that size with 350-500 horsepower and open up their throttles for little more than pride. Some of the vessels are over 40 feet long and pack over 1200 horsepower. The winnings are negligible; first place takes home $150, second place nets $100, and third wins $50. That’s nothing for people who pull in hundreds of thousands of dollars a year catching lobsters. The money doesn’t matter. The real prize is bragging rights.  Video, click here to read the story 10:29

NMFS Proposes State Water Exemptions for Scallop Fisheries in Maine and Massachusetts

The National Marine Fisheries Service is seeking comment on a proposed rule that would revise the State Waters Exemption Program under the Atlantic Sea Scallop Fishery Management Plan. Under this proposed rule, vessels holding both a Massachusetts state scallop permit and either a Limited Access General Category (LAGC) Individual Fishing Quota (IFQ) or LAGC Northern Gulf of Maine (NGOM) Federal scallop permit could continue to fish in state waters once the Federal Total Allowable Catch (TAC) for the NGOM Management Area has been fully harvested. This action would also modify the State Waters Exemption for Maine, which already has this exemption for vessels holding state scallop permits and LAGC NGOM permits, to include vessels that have both a state scallop permit and an LAGC IFQ permit. Read the notice in the Federal Register 12:17

Maine’s rebuilt scallop fishery is enjoying high demand from the culinary world

scallopMaine’s rebuilt scallop fishery is enjoying high demand from the culinary world for its prized meaty mollusks, and the 2016 season that ended last month is likely to go down as another strong year. All sea scallops have been growing in value over the past 15 years, and while Maine’s catch is a small fraction of the national total, they are a premium product for which restaurants and consumers pay top dollar. The Maine scallop fishery dwindled to just about 666,000 pounds in 2009 before rebuilding to more than 3 million pounds in each of the last three years. State fishing managers credit new regulations, including a rotational management system that protects localized areas from being too heavily fished. Read the rest here 16:30

Maine shrimp – get ’em while they’re hot!

Thanks to a study being conducted by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) and the states of Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts, four trawlers and two trappers have been selected to collect samples of northern shrimp from the Gulf of Maine. Each participating trawler is required to conduct five research trips in one region, and is being compensated $500 per trip. Each would be allowed to sell up to 1,800 pounds of shrimp per trip. Good article! Read the article here 17:30

Maine: Lobster license squatting

lobsterDM0811_468x521Maine has a fairly complicated system for limiting entry into the lucrative lobster fishing industry. As presently constructed, some would-be fishermen might wait a decade or more for the chance to have a license of their own. Currently, more than 300 people are waiting. No new licenses are issued in many lobster management zones until someone surrenders one. In other zones, entry is based on the number of trap tags that are surrendered.  Read the article here  10:06

Maine Department of Marine Resources approves reduction to scallop fishing days

mkThe Department of Marine Resources has voted in favor of a 10-day reduction for the upcoming season. Scallop season runs from early December to mid-April, at a time when lobster fishing is not as lucrative. The area that will see a change this year, called Zone 1, runs from New Hampshire to the Penobscot River. Last season, scallop fishing in that zone was allowed on 70 days. This season, it’ll only be allowed on 60. Last year, though, the fishery saw an 18-year high in terms of profit. Maine scallops were worth almost $7.5 million.  Read the rest here 07:36

Northern Shrimp fishery could re-open on a limited basis

Members of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission are taking comments from a series of public hearings and compiling them into recommendations. The shrimp fishery closed in 2013 and has yet to reopen because of concerns about shrimp population levels. Fishermen from harvested Maine shrimp prior to the collapse of the fishery.
Some of the guidelines being considered include establishing a system of state-by-state quotas and shortening the season to only 90 days. Video, Read the rest here 11:31

Maine – Bill to reduce scallop daily catch limit sunk by committee

mkA bill that, if voted into law, would allow fishermen with lapsed licenses back into the rebuilding scallop fishery was not well received by a standing room only crowd at a public hearing Wednesday afternoon. The bill, LD 908, also would have reduced the daily scallop catch limit in most of Maine by about 30 percent and would have reduced the maximum size of drags used in inner-island areas and bays to 5½ feet. Read the rest here 22:13

Where have all the ice smelt gone? N.H. ice shanties are empty, the catch in Maine is down, environmentalists struggle for answers

surveys smelt fishingThe fishermen are gone now because the smelt are gone. Catches of 60, 70, 100 smelt on a tide — the six-hour period between low and high tides — were routine. What happened? Some say it’s just a cycle, though the decline has been steady since the state began smelt surveying in the early 1980s. Studies blame the high levels of nitrogen washing into the bay from septic systems, lawn fertilizer and sewage treatment plants. The nitrogen prompts algae blooms that smother the grass and quite possibly smelt eggs clinging to the bottom in tidal headwaters. Read the rest here 09:48

Proposed fishermen’s academy aims to keep teens in school

ROCKLAND, Maine — The Class of 2015 at Oceanside High School started with 203 freshmen in the fall of 2011, but by this year only 158 seniors remain, a decline of nearly 25 percent. The Oceanside principal is proposing the school offer a fishermen academy to keep young fishermen in the classroom instead of dropping out without a high school diploma. Read the rest here 17:45

Maine has a dangerous lobster dependence, without a Plan B

ICEHARBOR021715-13.jpgMaine is in the midst of a lobster boom. But Maine’s dependence on the lobster, almost to the exclusion of other species that used to deliver significant value, is cause for concern in the same way as a small town’s heavy dependence on a paper mill for employment and economic activity. Read the rest here 11:25

Federal regulators consider lessening ban on single lobster pots

New regulations set by the National Marine Fisheries Service ban the use of lobstering equipment from Feb. 1 to April 30 off the Massachusetts coast. The goal is to reduce the chances of whales becoming entangled in the gear.The also ban single pots – or one trap per buoy line – outright starting June 1. Lobstermen would therefore have to tether multiple pots along a single line. But the state Division of Marine Fisheries is challenging the federal rules to allow single pots close to shore in three areas. Read the rest here 11:41

Maine to host public hearings about fish habitat plan – Tonight 6PM, Brewer – Tomorrow 6PM, Portland

NEFMC SidebarMaine will host two public hearings this week about a long-anticipated fishery management plan for New England waters. The New England Fishery Management Council is working on a habitat management plan for federal waters from Maine to Rhode Island and is considering many options to balance conservation with commercial fishing interests. A public comment period about the management plan ends Jan. 8. Locations here 07:42

Rome Packing Co., Inc., of East Providence Recalls Crab Meat

 A company is recalling crab meat they sold to several states after finding it was contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes bacteria. The Rhode Island Department of Health said on Friday that Rome Packing Co., Inc., of East Providence, issued the voluntary recall of several kinds of fresh and frozen crab meat sold under the Ocean’s Catch brand. The meat was distributed in Florida, Maine, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois and California to retail stores including but not limited to: Shaw’s Supermarkets, Legal Sea Foods, and Harbor Fish Market. Read the rest here 20:06

SCARBOROUGH, Maine: Lobster boat Seven Seas to the rescue! Pulls father and son aboard.

lobster boat scetchRough seas are being blamed for capsizing a 20-foot boat, stranding a father and son, who were rescued by a passing lobsterman who heard the U.S. Coast Guard’s call for help. The driver of the vessel Seven Seas heard the emergency call, issued at about 7:15 a.m., and was the first to arrive, with two Scarborough Fire and Rescue boats and a Coast Guard ship on his heels, Read the rest here  14:27

Maritime lobster industry watches Maine vote on boost for processors

Knife FightThe lobster industry in the Maritimes faces a new competitive threat from south of the border. People in the industry in Eastern Canadian are watching closely as Maine awaits the outcome of a November vote that could see US$7 million of public money pumped into lobster processing. Read the rest here 18:01

November referendum would dedicate $7 million in public money to Maine seafood and lobster processing.

lobsterDM0811_468x521THE US state of Maine has decided to challenge Canada’s historic and long held  dominance of the North Atlantic lobster business. The New England community will decide through a referendum in November whether to spend $7-million of public funds on its  seafood and lobster processing sector. Read the rest here 15:02

Islesford, Maine – Lobsters are on the move, but most lobstermen can’t be

“We know the water’s warmer,” Thomas said in the pier’s office this spring, noting what’s believed by scientists to be a key reason behind the lobsters’ expansion. “There’s no thought on that one.” “If the water keeps warming, one theory is the lobsters will just keep going north,” he added. “I don’t know. That’s the scariest part in my mind. We don’t know what’s gonna happen.” Read more here 21:02

Maine’s shrimp fishery may face new restrictions

Federal regulators (ASMFC) may limit the number of fishermen allowed to catch northern shrimp in the Gulf of Maine once the depleted fishery reopens.,,considering restrictions that could limit the number of licenses to fish for shrimp or the number of vessels allowed in the fishery. (catch shares?) The number of vessels in the fishery has fluctuated since 2000, with a low of 144 in 2006 and a high of 342 in 2011. Maine issued an average of 463 licenses per year from 2001 to 2011. The shrimp section also sets a total allowable catch limit every year. Read more here 07:30

A Climate of Change video series: Ocean Acidification in Alaska

In the second chapter of our series of videos on the effects of climate change on fisheries, Island Institute media specialist Scott Sell explores the effects of ocean acidification on the shellfish industry in Alaska — and what that might mean for Maine: Watch, and Read more here   17:19

Lobster, Lobster Lobster!

BDNMaine gears up to address looming lobster problem: the high number of inactive lobstermen – “Our industry’s changing. We need to be able to change with it,” Bob Baines of Spruce Head, who chairs the DMR’s lobster advisory council, said. “This is going to be a tough one — but you can’t keep kicking the can down the road. It needs to be dealt with.” Read more here

As the ocean gets warmer, are the lobsters heading to cooler northeast waters? – The lobster catch in zone A, from Schoodic Point east to the Canadian border, is seven times more now than it was just 10 years ago, Train said. “It’s good for them, but zone A, that’s our last zone,” he said, suggesting that maybe 10 years from now the majority of lobsters will have migrated even farther east — to Canadian waters. Read more here 09:01

Scalloping season kicks off along Maine coast in three zones from Kittery to Lubec

Maine scallop fishermen are kicking off a season that’ll last 70 days along most of the coast. But fishermen in the scallop-rich waters of Cobscook Bay along the Canadian border in far eastern Maine will be limited to a 50-day season. The season opened Monday in three zones from Kittery to Lubec. [email protected]