Tag Archives: Maine Aqua Ventus

Maine coastal town’s leaders vote to oppose offshore wind project

The St. George Select Board voted Monday to oppose an offshore wind project taking shape about 12 miles away, standing with local fishermen who say the project and its transmission cable would harm their livelihoods. The unanimous vote follows a recommendation made by an advisory committee created last month by the five-person Select Board to weigh the impact the Maine Aqua Ventus offshore wind project would have on the local community. “I think it’s a good idea we sever ourselves from [Maine Aqua Ventus] and that we support the fishermen in any way we can,” Select Board member Randy Elwell said Monday. click here to read the story 21:39

Afraid my way of life may be replaced by wind turbines

My name is Dustin Delano. I’m a 27-year-old lobstermen from Friendship. I find myself at a loss of words today. Completely frustrated and lost in which direction to go next. Last night, I attended a selectmen’s meeting in St. George as they were seeking public comment on allowing a cable to come ashore in Port Clyde which will connect commercial wind turbines located south of Monhegan Island to the mainland. The fishing heritage in the gulf of Maine is incredibly magnificent. For generations, my family and other families along the coast have worked together and made a living from the fruit of the sea. Now, in the year 2017, this generational way of life is at risk and could possibly be ruined. click here to read the story 19:52

Gulf of Maine: What happens when a small Maine town and an offshore energy project collide

A project taking shape about 12 miles offshore from the village of Port Clyde is creating a rift in the tight-knit fishing communities on the St. George peninsula. On one side is Maine Aqua Ventus, a pilot project to test floating turbines as sources of renewable energy. On the other side are fishing families concerned that the turbines and cables used to transport the energy ashore could disrupt fishing habitats on which they rely.,,, “Our largest concern is what is going to happen after this,” said Randy Cushman, 55, a lifelong fisherman and resident of Port Clyde. “I’m worried about the next generation of fishermen, that’s what I’m worried about. I could really see them being eliminated by this. I really can.” click here to read the story 08:13

Maine coastal villagers say cables from offshore wind project will wreck their way of life

Opponents of an offshore wind project slated for development off Monhegan Island will take their fight to a new level Tuesday, when they plan to file a petition designed to prevent cables delivering electricity from the project to the mainland from passing through St. George. The group Preserve Our Remarkable Town, or PORT, says it has collected more than 300 signatures from residents of St. George, which includes the villages of Tenants Harbor and Port Clyde, who fear the the project will harm the local fishing industry and undermine the quality of life and property values in their communities. click here to read the story 19:39

Bill to move Monhegan wind power project draws crowd to legislative hearing  

Lawmakers heard passionate, conflicting testimony Tuesday from dozens of people on a bill aimed at moving a nationally significant wind energy test site farther from Monhegan Island. Supporters said views of two massive floating turbines would jeopardize tourism, lobster fishing, migrating birds and the sense of serenity associated with Monhegan’s wild beauty. Some said island residents were being bullied and divided by the University of Maine and the partners of Maine Aqua Ventus, a project that is testing new technology for offshore wind turbines about 3 miles from the island. The project initially promised a small, brief test, but has now expanded it beyond anyone’s expectations. Opponents of the bill, which would move the test site at least 7 miles farther out to sea, said it is unneeded and unwelcome, adding that it would short-circuit the process by which islanders are evaluating the project’s potential benefits. Both sides said much is at stake. But representatives of the Maine Lobstering Union, which represents 500 fishermen, said wind power has no place on the Maine coast. Other lobstermen, though, spoke in favor of the turbines. Mary Weber, whose husband, Matt, fishes around the island, said they didn’t think the turbines would deter tourists, and might even draw a new set of visitors interested in clean energy. click here to read the story 15:30

UK Fishermen Offer Maine Counterparts Offshore Wind Advice

Some commercial fishermen from Great Britain are offering their Maine counterparts advice on protecting their interests, as the state’s first offshore wind development moves forward. Maine Aqua Ventus needs to secure a nearly $47 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy before it can begin construction on a 12-megawatt, two-turbine development off Monhegan Island. At a meeting in Rockland, the UK fishermen said the industry here needs to have a seat at the table with developers as the Maine project moves forward. Read and [email protected]   Shut this shit down. 18:41 They don’t want it.

Monhegan residents voice concerns over proposed offshore wind project – worry about noise and visual impacts, as well as effects on lobstering.

Some residents of Monhegan aren’t ready to trade their cherished natural sanctuary for cheaper electricity. Residents and visitors to the island have submitted their concerns to the Maine Public Utilities Commission, which is considering the merits of a pilot wind-power project called Maine Aqua Ventus. The project could lead to a 50-turbine wind farm in the Gulf of Maine that could produce enough power for 6,000 homes and slash the cost of electricity on Monhegan, which is 16 miles off the mainland. Read more @portlandpress  12:06