Tag Archives: Maine lobster industry

Trade Deals: Maine Lobster industry fears lost sales from ramped-up Canadian exports

A new trade deal looming between Canada and the European Union is setting off alarm bells in the Maine lobster industry. The deal between Canada and the EU – the largest seafood consumer market in the world – would eliminate tariffs on Canadian lobster exports into Europe and give the Maritimes a competitive advantage over their American counterparts, who would be stuck selling lobsters with tariffs ranging from 8 percent for a live lobster to 20 percent on processed or cooked lobster. A weak Canadian dollar, which is now valued at about 75 percent of a U.S. dollar, will only make Canadian lobster that much more attractive to importers in the 28 member nations of the European Union, which is the second biggest importer of American lobsters, second only to Canada, according to trade data. In 2016, the EU imported $152 million worth of lobsters from the U.S., most of it from Maine. continue reading the story here 08:07

Maine lobstermen’s group weighs in on death of entangled whale

right-whale-statsThere are signs the ropes were from fishing gear not used for lobstering, an official says, as others discuss regulations that protect the endangered animal. The death of a 45-ton right whale found entangled in fishing line about 12 miles off the Maine coast over the weekend has caught the attention of the Maine lobster industry even though it’s not clear whether the whale’s demise was related to lobster fishing. The right whale is endangered and protected by the federal government. Patrice McCarron, executive director of the Maine Lobstermen’s Association, said preliminary indications appear to show that the ropes found on the whale were much larger than those typically used by lobstermen. The larger ropes would instead more often be found in deep-sea fishing, she said. Read the story here 17:18

Maine lobster industry wary as warm waters suggest repeat of disastrous 2012 season

For those in the lobster industry, any sign of a return to the conditions of 2012 is cause for high anxiety. Researchers say the industry needs to be prepared for that possibility because warming trends are laying the groundwork for a potential repeat of the disastrous season of four years ago. “We learned a hard lesson in 2012,” said Patrice McCarron, executive director of the Maine Lobstermen’s Association. Because of warm waters in the Gulf of Maine, peak harvesting started in May that year, weeks ahead of schedule. The catch jumped more than 20 percent, from 104 million pounds in 2011 to 127 million pounds in 2012. The shedding season,,, Read the article here 10:29

The enigma behind America’s freak, 20-year lobster boom

lobster discardEven as biologists puzzle over Maine’s strange serendipity, a more ominous mystery is emerging. A scientist who tracks baby lobsters reports that in the last few years their numbers have abruptly plummeted, up and down Maine’s coast. With the number of breeding lobsters at an all-time high, it’s unclear why the baby lobster population would be cratering—let alone what it portends. It could reflect a benign shift in baby lobster habitats. Or it could be that the two-decade boom is already on its way to a bust. To form a clearer picture why, we first need to unravel the possible causes of the current lobster glut. Read the rest here 09:23

Maine lobster industry – Long winter boosts lobster prices

The unusually cold winter may finally be over, but the lobsterDM0811_468x521 is still feeling its effects. The current wholesale market price of lobster is up to an average of $9 a pound, even higher in some places. Those high prices could last into the midsummer season before soft shell lobsters hit the menu. “The water temperature right now is 38, last year at this time it was around 42, 43. So we’re behind in the temperature. We might make it up if the spring gets a lot warmer, we might get caught up,” said sale manager of Beal’s Lobster Pier in Southwest Harbor, Rob Bauer. Read the rest here

Maine Lobster industry grateful for ‘normal’ summer

holland 38 botwIf there is anything commercial fishermen in Maine have learned over the past several years, it is that things aren’t the way they used to be. Dean Crosman, owner of Little River Lobster Co. in Cutler, said landings have intensified in recent weeks. He agreed with Carver, saying cold water temperatures this spring led to the later molt and have helped keep prices afloat. Read the rest here 07:23

Maine lobster industry encouraged to plan ahead for likely fishery decline

BDNPatrick Keliher, commissioner of the Maine Department of Marine Resources, stressed that message Tuesday to a few dozen lobstermen and other people who attended an industry meeting at the local Neighborhood House.  Read more here  07:29

Maine Lobster Industry Transitions As Lobster Harvesting Continues to Surge

Mark Murrell of GetMaineLobster.com discusses the Maine lobster industry and improvements he and others in his line of work believe should be made to processing facilities and marketing campaigns in the state. more@prweb.com 11:48

Letters to the editor – New fee will add to lobstermen’s woes, lobsterman Nelson King, East Boothbay

A recent article (“Maine lobster industry supports new fee,” March 6)  is  incorrect. The article states that the majority of lobstermen are  in  favor of L.D. 486 and L.D.182, requiring lobstermen to pay 74  percent of  the Lobster Promotion Council’s budget increase. They are  not. continued