Tag Archives: New Bedford

Fishing vessel sinks in New Bedford Harbor

The fishing vessel Challenge sank early Wednesday on city’s waterfront, officials said. Fire Chief Michael Gomes said the Fire Department found the 65-foot fishing vessel had sunk by its stern and was leaking diesel fuel and lube oil into the harbor when they arrived. The Fire Department was notified about 4:30 a.m. Fire officials deployed 600 feet of containment boom to contain the spill and multiple bundles of absorbent to absorb the oils once they were contained inside the booms. click here to read the story 12:50

Coast Guard oversees fuel spill cleanup in New Bedford Harborclick here to read the story 17:43

Don Cuddy: Port of New Bedford needs more dredging if it’s going to grow

It remains hugely frustrating that no one at the state level seems to recognize just how important this port is. When the Seastreak ferry recently broke down, it had to tie up at the State Pier for repairs. This in turn displaced the Voyager, a 130-foot fishing vessel, which had to move to Leonard’s Wharf, where boats are already moored five-deep. “We need updated infrastructure. When you have a 130-foot boat tied to a pier designed for 70-80 foot boats your infrastructure isn’t going to last long,” Ed Anthes-Washburn, the affable executive director of the Harbor Development Commission, told me as we toured the working waterfront in a HDC launch last week. “We also need to activate the rest of our waterfront.” click here to read the story 13:01

New Bedford launches seafood branding campaign and website

For generations New Bedford fishermen withstood the elements to do their jobs. Through rain storms they fished. In choppy waters they fished. Against harsh winds they fished. So it was fitting that the unveiling of the city’s newly-created seafood brand was delivered in the rain at the Custom House Square in downtown New Bedford Thursday evening. “We are the biggest, the baddest, the most comprehensive fishing port in America,” Mayor Jon Mitchell said. “We are going to scream from the mountain tops that we are the biggest fishing port in America. We are a real seaport and real fishing port. We want everyone to know that.” click here to read the story, click here to visit www.NewBedfordSeafood.org 09:31

Fire in the fo’c’sle: Heavy smoke but no injuries on scallop boat in New Bedford

The bunk room of the scallop boat Double Diamond caught fire on Leonard’s Wharf Tuesday afternoon, probably from welding, firefighters said. No one was injured. Smoke was coming from the vessel’s interior when New Bedford firefighters arrived, according to District Chief Steven Beaulieu, the incident commander.  “There was heavy smoke pouring out of the back hatch, just below the pilot house,” he told The Standard-Times. “We had heavy smoke pouring from the forward vent on the fo’c’sle. The guys advanced lines. We had talked to the workers. They were working forward doing welding operations, and something must have started.” The fire was reported around 2 p.m. Maurice Lemieux of Dartmouth owns the 84-foot scalloper; click here to read the story 21:52

New Bedford Mayor Mitchell sends NOAA letter requesting Rafael permits stay in New Bedford

Mayor Jon Mitchell penned a letter to NOAA regarding Carlos Rafael’s permits, (click here to read the letter) a day after Maine’s congressional delegation signed a letter regarding the permits. In an argument consisting of four pages, Mitchell provided legal precedent for the Department of Justice and NOAA to punish Rafael, while also keeping the 13 fishing permits in question in New Bedford. He likens Rafael’s case to those cases involving wrongdoing by the head of a large business. He states, “It is common for the government to tailor punishment so as to avoid harm to others who were not involved.” Rafael’s business employ 285 fishermen. Mitchell suggested Rafael sell his entire business to other New Bedford companies, forfeiting the proceeds to the government. It would entirely exclude Rafael from fishing despite possessing more permits than the 13 in question.  click here to read the story 11:33

Can offshore wind revive America’s ports? This town hopes so

New Bedford – This salt-caked fishing port has been flush with wind prospectors ever since Massachusetts legislators passed a law for massive wind development in the shallow waters south of Martha’s Vineyard.,,, States up and down the Atlantic coast are rushing to become the capital of America’s burgeoning offshore wind industry, hoping the massive turbines will breathe new life into ports mired by a shrinking fishing industry and a flagging industrial base. Maryland officials last month approved renewable energy credits for two developments totaling 368 megawatts off their shores in a bid to transform Baltimore and Ocean City into the industry’s manufacturing and maintenance hub in the Mid-Atlantic (Climatewire, May 12). Lawmakers in New Jersey are counting down the days until Gov. Chris Christie (R) leaves office early next year, when they plan to restore their own credits for offshore wind developments (Energywire, June 9). In New York, Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) wants to bring 2,400 megawatts of wind power online by 2030 (Energywire, Jan. 11). But few places are betting on offshore wind quite like New Bedford. click here to read the story 11:58

Devon fishing port invited to twin with America’s top port

America’s top fishing port has approached Brixham, which was recently crowned the UK’s port of the year for the second year running, to see if it would be interested in twinning. The port of New Bedford, in Massachusetts, USA, has much in common with the South Devon port. Torbay councillor Vic Ellery gave a presentation to Brixham Town Council at its meeting on Thursday evening. Cllr Ellery said he had been approached by South Western Fish Producers Organisation chief executive Jim Portus, at the request of the director of New Bedford Harbour Development Commission, to enquire whether Brixham Town Council would be interested in setting up a twinning arrangement. “The mayor’s office of this city of New Bedford is very keen to arrange a civic, tourism and economic partnership to the benefit of both ports.” click here to read the story 09:48

What’s next for Carlos Rafael’s fishing permits?

New Bedford – Almost a week ago, City Council members asked for their names to be attached to a late file agenda pertaining to Carlos Rafael’s groundfish permits. Behind Ward 4 Councilor Dana Rebeiro, Council President Joseph Lopes and Ward 5 Councilor Kerry Winterson, the council requested “that the Committee on Internal Affairs meet with Attorney General Maura Healey and NOAA to discuss how current owners and mariners operating in New Bedford have the first right of refusal to acquire licenses to be auctioned as result of the plea agreement in the case of The United States vs. Carlos Rafael… The written motion was a bit premature. Following Thursday’s council meeting, Rebeiro acknowledged the measure was “to get ahead of the ball” in terms of where the permits may land. So what’s next? click here to read the story 19:11

Series of coral protection hearings planned for New England

Federal fishery managers will hold a host of public hearings in New England and New York about a plan to protect corals in key East Coast fishing areas. The New England Fishery Management Council is hosting seven public hearings about alternatives it is considering about the protection of corals in the Gulf of Maine and Georges Bank. The hearings will take place from May 22 to 25 in Montauk, Narragansett, New Bedford, Gloucester, Portsmouth, and Ellsworth. There will also be a web-based hearing on May 26. The fishery council says it wants to collect feedback from fishermen and other stakeholders about the coral protection Link 21:28

New Bedford among crowd staking claim to Carlos Rafael’s permits

Before Carlos Rafael uttered the word “guilty” last month, the judge made the New Bedford fishing mogul aware of the possibility of forfeiting his assets, which means permits, too. About two months remain before Rafael’s sentencing date, but cities and states have started to acknowledge that possibility as well. “The goal for me is to get ahead of the ball to make partnerships with people that have the same interests, which is keeping the licenses local,” Ward 4 Councilor Dana Rebeiro said. John Pappalardo and Maggie Raymond, the executive director of Associated Fisheries of Maine, expect the status of Rafael’s permits to be decided on the sentencing date. Still, Raymond is already lobbying for any forfeited permit to go to Maine. click here to read the story 08:16

Not exactly a breeze: Offshore wind still faces challenges

Amid all of the challenges that could face offshore wind power along the East Coast — legal disputes from commercial fishing advocates, construction plans altered by whale migrations, President Donald Trump’s emphasis on revitalizing fossil fuels and more — some promising news for renewable industry supporters arrived in mid-March. That’s when a telling indication of how offshore wind power might fare under President Trump was delivered, after an uncertain, wait-and-see winter. Following months of silence about offshore wind, a statement by Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke gave an early glimpse of the administration’s tone. click here to read the story 09:22

From Port to Plate: A journey of New Bedford’s most profitable product

Who knew that a silver dollar-sized scallop could provide such bang for a buck? As the most profitable item turned over in the most profitable port in the country, this milk-colored mollusk has almost been solely responsible for the re-birth of New Bedford’s working waterfront since the turn of the century. While other New England ports have shrunk or been gentrified from a working waterfront to high rise condos and upscale restaurants, New Bedford has thrived. OUT AT SEA- Captain Earl Chor Sr. described an early 12-day April trip to the Elephant Trunk Flex Access Area as “smooth” despite working around a few days of harsh weather.,, TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER- In the damp and hollowed display room of BASE there are dozens of tall cardboard bins filled with ice and bagged scallops, known as lots, lining the room.,, SPANNING THE GLOBE- click here to read this big story 08:51

More than 8,000 pounds of stolen scallops circulated through New Bedford port

More than 8,000 pounds of stolen scallops valued at the time at $192,050 circulated through multiple seafood houses last December, according to court documents obtained by The Standard-Times. New Bedford police began investigating the disappearance of the scallops from Continental Cold Storage in February. A warrant was issued for the arrest of Antonio Vieira and Michael Caton, claiming 8,350 pounds of scallops were stolen from Seatrade International and that Viera attempted to sell them to a number of seafood houses in New Bedford. Vieira is a resident of Tiverton, Rhode Island, and Caton, formerly a resident of Riverside, Rhode Island, now resides in California. An employee of Continental Cold Storage at the time of the incident, Vieira was charged in March for larceny from a building, uttering false pretenses, forging a document and conspiracy. In a 24-page narrative, New Bedford Police Detective Barry J. Pacheco detailed his investigation,, continue reading the story here 19:06

Trivia: Sail back to the early days of New Bedford fish dealers

Chatham-born Linus S. Eldridge went to sea as a teenager. By the time of his marriage in 1902, however, he had left fishing to become a fish dealer. He and his wife, Harriet Nelson Dexter, settled in her hometown of Mattapoisett, operated a fish trap there, and began dealing in seafood. They bought scallops and quahogs from local fishermen, stocked the goods in their garage and resold them to wholesalers. Years later, to break into the New Bedford market, the Eldridges had to outmaneuver the politically connected J. S. Childs family, who ran the New Bedford Fish Company on Pier 4, eventually buying them out. Boats began landing fish there for Eldridge in 1928. Read the story here 09:53

New Bedford again tops nation for dollar value of fishing catch

new-bedford-top-value-portThe city’s port has again topped the country for dollar value of its fishing catch, NMFS reported this week, citing 2015 landings worth $322 million. That marks 16 years in a row that New Bedford has held the top-value title, which is thanks largely to scallops. Dutch Harbor, Alaska, again was tops for total volume of catch, landing 787 million pounds last year.  “The scallop industry has put New Bedford at the top of the food chain, as it were, of fishing ports for the last 16 years — that’s a very impressive streak,” said Ed Anthes-Washburn, port director for the city’s Harbor Development Commission. “It really shows the impact of scallops but also the impact of cooperative research.” In the 1990s, SMAST scientists Brian Rothschild and Kevin Stokesbury pioneered innovations in counting scallops, with cameras tested and used on local scallopers. The resulting data affected stock assessments by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), ultimately leading to larger catch quotas and helping secure steady catches for waterfront businesses. Read the rest here 19:52

New Bedford: John Linehan, synonymous with the fishing industry, dies at 94

If any one person would be the face of the fishing industry during the last half century or more, it could well be John F. Linehan, who died Aug. 14 at the age of 94. Not a fisherman himself, the Lewiston, Maine native arrived in New Bedford in 1951 after serving in the military and graduating from Bates College, class of 1953. Linehan wore many hats in his long career, first as general manager of the New Bedford Seafood Producers Association, a fisheries adviser in Korea, and the first director of the Harbor Development Commission. He was later operations manager at Frionor Corp., vice president and general manager of Maritime Terminal, Inc., and 12 years as the industry liaison officer for the National Marine Fisheries Service. His friends, who visited him regularly until the end of his life, say they admired Linehan for being not only intelligent but funny, always ready with a wisecrack. Read the story here 22:05

New Bedford to unveil Fishermen’s Tribute Monument at 6 p.m. June 30 in Tonneson Park

AR-160626934.jpg&MaxW=315&MaxH=315New Bedford will celebrate the installation of the Fishermen’s Tribute Monument at 6 p.m. June 30 located in Tonneson Park on the New Bedford waterfront. The installation of the bronze statute will serve as a public tribute to the generations of commercial fishermen and their families. The Fishermen’s Tribute Fund Committee, lead by chairperson Deb Shrader, fundraised for more than 10 years to make the monument a reality. The Fishermen’s Tribute Monument is a bronze statue that depicts the scene of a fishing family; a mother stands near her fisherman husband, who is down on one knee, his daughter in his lap hugging him, his hand on the shoulder of his son who holds a crew cap. The sculpture is the work of New Bedford artist Erik Durant. The passing of the cap to the son signifies the continuation of the fishing tradition, while the clinging daughter expresses the regret of separation that her mother must hold in. The woman is located in the back of the scene, standing tall, representing the wives and mothers who stay behind to hold their families together while fishermen are at sea. Link 21:38

New Bedford becoming hub for emerging “blue tech” industry

camera_view_of_skate_catchOn a March afternoon at The Black Whale restaurant on New Bedford’s waterfront, steps away from docked fishing boats, Chris Rezendes signaled to waitstaff as his party gathered for lunch. He was going to need more tables. Guests included Ed Anthes-Washburn, port director for the city’s Harbor Development Commission; Kevin Stokesbury, chairman of the Department of Fisheries Oceanography at UMass Dartmouth’s School for Marine Science & Technology (SMAST); John Haran, manager of fishery Sector 13 and newly elected member of Dartmouth’s Select Board; and Rezendes, founder of INEX Advisors and an affiliated Internet connectivity company, IoT Impact LABS, based in New Bedford. Read the rest here 13:59:01

Rep. Bill Straus — Impact of the federal fisheries arrests in New Bedford

wstrausBy now the local reaction to the waterfront arrests in New Bedford of one of the port’s major figures has begun to shift to inevitable questions of the role of the federal government in the regulation of commercial fishing. Operating under federal law, the current groundfish system of control, the so-called “catch shares” plan, began with Amendment 16 in 2009 by vote of the New England Fishery Management Council. This intricate system of allocating by fish species what can be caught and landed by licensed federal permit holders has clearly changed the market economics for New England fishing; a rapid concentration of fish permit holders has led to what functions as a government-created near monopoly. Read the rest here 07:43

Mayor Jon Mitchell: New Bedford would be great home for Northeast Fisheries Science Center

If NOAA Fisheries should decide to move the Northeast Fisheries Science Center out of Woods Hole, Mayor Jon Mitchell said New Bedford would be just right for a new home. Mitchell calls the city “the best place in the Northeast by far.” For about a year, the Commerce Department, which contains NOAA, has been assessing the adequacy and the condition of the various buildings that constitute the laboratory. NOAA spokeswoman Teri Frady said repairs, renovations or replacement are all possible options and any definitive direction is still a long way off. Read the article here 08:00

Just Now!! The first loads of Mackerel are being unloaded in New Bedford!

enterprise unloading at norpelThe first loads of Mackerel are being unloaded in New Bedford by the Midwater pair Enterprise and Retriever. The fish are rumored to be high quality and should provide a nice bit of money for crews whose livelyhood has been beleaguered by increasingly difficult regulation and closures. With the recent bit of bad weather subsiding expect most midwater vessels to depart for sea in search of some holiday cheer after a very poor herring year. 07:43

Our View: Fishery science will make all the difference

On Tuesday, the top administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Dr. Kathryn Sullivan, visited New Bedford to meet with local members of the fishing community and spoke in a way that suggests the regulators understand the industry’s perspective. “We are committed to working with the best science and trying to find the right way forward to sustain the health of the fisheries and the fishing community,” she said following a closed-door meeting, a harbor tour and a discussion at the School for Marine Science and Technology in the South End. Read the rest here 08:34

How Gloucester won lion’s share of fishing aid

cashAll things considered, it could not have gone much better. The small working group assembled by Mayor Sefatia Romeo Theken in February was tasked with helping identify and contact city waterfront businesses that might be eligible to receive some of the $750,000 in federal funds set aside to help Massachusetts shoreside businesses damaged by the ongoing groundfish disaster. The committee identified 15 Gloucester businesses willing to go through the application process. By comparison, consider . The historic whaling city on the state’s southeast coast — and now, thanks to its burgeoning scallop fleet, the state’s most lucrative port — had 10 of its shoreside businesses collectively receive $246,430. Read the rest here 08:21

New Bedford top port again thanks to scallops

New Bedford was the  in 2013, landing $379 million worth of seafood, according to a new report. The finding by Icelandic Bank Research marks the 15th consecutive year the city has been the nation’s most prosperous port, even as the total volume of fish harvested statewide has declined. Local fishermen and officials say the reason for New Bedford’s success is due largely to scallops, the state’s most valuable species. Read the rest here 15:19

New Bedford: Frozen Fishing From a New England Port

Mark Abraham, who has fished the New England coast for decades, kept a sharp eye on his catch as the slimy haddock spilled onto a dockside conveyor belt. He had just returned from 10 frigid days at sea, among the most brutal he has spent. “It’s probably been the worst winter in 10 years,” he said as workers sorted the fish by weight and slid them into bins. “It’s not even the ice that’s stopping you, it’s the wind. It’s too rough to fish. If it’s rough like that, you don’t catch anything.” Read the rest here 16:58

New Bedford welcomes US Coast Guard Cutter Katherine Walker to ease storm impact

The backing up has arrived in New Bedford to help the city break through ice forming in the harbor. Weeks of cold temperatures and snow have caused plenty of issues here in New Bedford, but ice jamming the harbor has trapped fishing boats and encased piers.”New Bedford’s the largest commercial fishing port in America,” Mitchell said. “It’s one of the busiest ports in America.”   Video, Read the rest here 09:11

This Morning, in New Bedford!

new bedford feb 2 storm08:49

New Bedford again leads the nation in value of seafood catch, Gloucester takes huge losses

War Cry Scallop dredgeFor the 14th year in a row, New Bedford ranked first in the nation for the commercial value of fish landed in 2013, NOAA Fisheries announced Tuesday. New Bedford landed 130 million pounds of seafood last year but, boosted by the highly valuable sea scallop, its value was $379 million. Gloucester’s catch also declined significantly, dropping from 83 million pounds in 2012 to 62 million last year, sinking its value to $42 million from $57 million. Read the rest here 12:12

New Bedford: Winners showed their skill at waterfront festival

mlappOn Saturday ,groundfishing skills were highlighted with a net-mending competition emceed by net designer Tor Bendiksen of Reidar’s Manufacturing, and a rope splicing contest emceed by Barbara Merry of Marlinspike Artist. Winners of the net mending competition were Meghan Lapp, Geoffrey Hatfield and Sarah Fortin, while Kevin Curole of Grand Isle, Louisiana, won the splicing contest. Read the rest here 09:47

New Bedford!! – Complete Guide to the 2014 Working Waterfront Festival – September 27th, 28th

The nation’s number one commercial fishing port hosts the annual Working Waterfront Festival, a free, family friendly celebration of commercial fishing culture. The 2014 event takes place on the working piers of New Bedford’s historic waterfront on Saturday, September 27th and Sunday, September 28th. Read the rest here, and get to the festival! 07:08