Tag Archives: Nordic Aquafarms

Letter: Open-net pen aquaculture is a failed technology

From the letter, The key question is whether the future of salmon aquaculture in the North American market will be closed-containment land-based (CCLB) or open-net pen (ONP). The government of Newfoundland and Labrador is betting $30 million that projects like the environmentally disastrous Grieg ONP project planned for Placentia Bay will carry the day and Couturier agrees. ACOA is in for another $10 million grant, not loan, according to its website. Meanwhile, as The Telegram article demonstrates, companies like Nordic Aquafarms in Belfast, Maine, are forging ahead with CCLB projects in Maine and many other U.S. locations. These projects use Recirculatory Aquaculture Systems (RAS), by Leo White >click to read< 09:08

Nordic Aquafarms Set to Ask County for ‘Financial Incentives’ Before Committing to Indoor Fish Farm Project

In the five-plus months since Norwegian aquaculture firm Nordic Aquafarms announced plans to build a large-scale, land-based fish farming facility on the Samoa peninsula, we’ve heard a lot about the potential benefits to the local community, including dozens of jobs and hundreds of millions of dollars in revenues and local investments. But wouldn’t you know it? There’s a catch!  >click to read< 12:02

Attorneys continue municipal law debate in case against Nordic Aquafarms

As the lawsuit against Nordic Aquafarms, Inc., the City of Belfast, and other parties-in-interest continues the slow procession through the legal system, the amount of evidence submitted for the case has grown to require two two-inch binders, holding stipulation exhibits 1-36, which include emails, public notices, and City of Belfast Answers to Interrogatories, etc. The binders are in addition to a legal file also nearly an inch thick filled with court dates, motions, objections, and other legal documents.  The suit, brought by Eleanor Daniels and Donna Broderick, has been one of many issues Nordic has encountered on its quest to build one of the world’s largest land-based salmon farms in the small coastal city. >click to read<12:27

Belfast Conflict Waves A ‘Red Flag’ For Dutch Firm Looking To Add A Third Fish Farm In Maine

The Dutch entrepreneur who would like to build a land-based yellowtail fish farm somewhere in Maine said that the relentless opposition that some have shown to Nordic Aquafarms’ proposed Belfast salmon farm has made him proceed here with caution. Ohad Maiman of Kingfish Zeeland said in a phone interview last week that company officials believe they have found two viable sites on the Maine coast after reviewing 22. But he does not want to identify those communities yet in hopes of avoiding the same kind of response that Nordic, a Norwegian-based company that is working to build a $500 million facility, has grappled with since announcing its plans in January 2018. >click to read<11:13

Maine Voices: Nordic Aquafarms isn’t acting like a good neighbor to Belfast residents

Its continual changes of plan and apparent misrepresentation of its land rights should raise questions among regulators.,,, For instance, As time went on, the company dropped and changed one after another of the plans that had made it sound like a clean and responsible business for our community. The company’s effluent pipe, it turned out, would be dumping 7.7 million gallons a day of warm (59 to 64.4 degrees Fahrenheit) wastewater in the bay – more than neighboring Bayside is authorized to dump in a year. This water, containing 1,484 pounds of nitrogen per day, as well as another 400 pounds of suspended solids and other chemicals, would be discharged through a pipe that has been shortened by over a third and will be many miles away from any “deep ocean currents.” >click to read<15:47

So This Pipe Is Just Spewing Blood And Fish Guts Into The Open Water – >Video, click to read<

Land Based In Name Only? Belfast lobstermen fear Nordic Aquafarms’ discharge pipes will harm fishery

Some Belfast lobster fishermen told the local Harbor Advisory Committee that they were concerned that dredging for installation of Nordic Aquafarms’ discharge and intake pipes along submerged lands could release mercury in the ocean sediment and pose a hazard to navigation. “The fishermen have concerns,” advisory committee member Dan Miller told the council. The committee doesn’t have any purview over Nordic Aquafarms’ proposal, he noted. “Our place is to ask you to make sure those concerns are in some way addressed by the appropriate agency.” >click to read<15:10

Maine is running out of lobster bait. Is salmon the answer?

Genevieve McDonald fishes out of Maine’s largest lobster port aboard the F/V Hello Darlings II. Last November, she became Maine’s first female commercial fisherman (“fisherman” and “lobsterman” are the strongly preferred terms for both women and men in the industry, she says) elected to the Maine House of Representatives, representing a district that includes Maine’s two biggest lobster ports. Not surprisingly, McDonald ran on a platform many in the fishing industry support. But above all else, one issue stood out. “Our biggest issue is the bait crisis,” she said in November,,, >click to read<11:51

Harbor district, energy authority looking to create a ‘clean’ industry future with aquafarm, offshore wind energy

The Humboldt Bay Harbor, Recreation and Conservation District and the Redwood Coast Energy Authority outlined plans Friday at the Humboldt County Economic Development Summit for infrastructure upgrades on the Samoa peninsula to build a land-based aquafarm and offshore wind energy project with an anticipated completion date of 2025 or 2026 — renewable energy projects that could have a significant positive impact on the county’s workforce development. >click to read<10:07

Let’s Take a Closer Look at This Big Fish Farm Proposal for the Samoa Peninsula

There have been lots of ideas in recent years for how to maximize the economic potential of Humboldt Bay. “More cruise ships!” some suggested. “More oysters!” “Less-restrictive zoning!” “How about a new railroad or two?” But as far as we can tell, no one even dreamed of suggesting that the Samoa peninsula could host one of the world’s largest indoor fish farms. No one imagined that Redwood Marine Terminal II, a contaminated brownfield site still littered with the rubble of an abandoned pulp mill, could be chosen to house a 600,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art aquaculture facility capable of supplying the West Coast with nearly 60 million tons pounds of fish per year. That concept, and the Norwegian company that plans to bring it to fruition, found us. >click to read<20:20

Harbor District Approves Lease for Massive Fish Farm

The Humboldt Bay Harbor, Recreation and Conservation District today approved a 30-year lease with Norwegian company Nordic Aquafarms to build a massive fish farm at the former pulp mill after hearing concerns the deal was ushered through without public review. The plan is to build a land-based aquaculture facility that would eventually produce some 25,000 tons of fish a year – likely salmon or steelhead – to serve as the West Coast hub for Nordic Aquafarms, which is currently in the process of developing an East Coast equivalent in Belfast, Maine.,,, Included in the terms is the right for the company to discharge 6 million gallons of wastewater per day using the site’s ocean outfall pipe, which extends 1.5 miles offshore.>click to read<11:51

Proposed salmon farm rattles some in Belfast. Another in Bucksport draws few objections.

Belfast and Bucksport are separated by just 24 miles, and both are closely connected to the Penobscot River and Penobscot Bay. But you would never know that from the very different way that two proposals for large, land-based salmon farms have been received by members of their respective communities over the past year. In Belfast, opposition to Nordic Aquafarms’ proposed $150 million salmon farm is fierce and outspoken,,, In Bucksport, there is virtually no vocal opposition as Whole Oceans works on building its own $250 million indoor aquaculture facility on the site of the former Verso paper mill. >click to read<12:42

The Visionaries of Evolution: The Future of Fish Farming May Be Indoors

If it catches on, indoor aquaculture could play a critical role in meeting the needs of a swelling human population, Nordic CEO Erik Heim says. He believes it could do so without the pollution and other potential threats to wild fish that can accompany traditional aquaculture—although the indoor approach does face environmental challenges of its own. “There’s always some risk, but the risk of the land-based system is a small percentage of the risk of an outdoor system,” says Michael Timmons, an environmental engineer at Cornell University who has studied aquaculture for more than 20 years and is not involved in the Nordic project. >click to read<16:54

Norwegian company to build large, land-based salmon farm in Belfast

A Norway company intends to build a land-based salmon farm in Belfast, initially investing $150 million and creating 60 jobs within two years. Nordic Aquafarms, an international developer of land-based aquaculture, has signed agreements to purchase 40 acres on the outskirts of Belfast, where it will build one of the world’s largest land-based salmon farms, according to a release from the city.,,, It chose Maine because of the state’s pristine environment, cold water conditions,,, >click here to read< 13:06