Tag Archives: Northwest Atlantic Marine Alliance

Northwest Atlantic Marine Alliance – Fisheries policy is breeding an industry beset by corruption

AR-160309730.jpg&MaxW=650As an organization led by commercial fishermen, we have long been concerned that the drive to consolidate the industry would lead to the kind of collusion and corruption alleged in the case of a local fishing mogul  Fisheries policy makers have claimed that programs such as catch shares would lead to fewer, more easily regulated fishing operations. Not surprisingly, fewer players, such as New Bedford-based , who was arrested in an IRS-led sting operation, now own and control more of the fishing industry, including permits, quotas, and shoreside facilities. Read the rest here 15:15

Former Patriot Jarvis Green stumps for small boat fishermen

Former says federal fishing managers need to do a better job of protecting the futures of New England’s community fishermen. Green joined a group called the Northwest Atlantic Marine Alliance on Wednesday to lobby regulators to urge them to consider small fishermen when setting policy. Green relayed his experience growing up around shrimpers in his home state of Louisiana and talked about the challenges faced by today’s fishermen around the country. He says fishermen “mean a lot” to New England’s economy and they deserve support. Read the rest here 17:07

Fishermen Plan Demonstration during NEFMC Meeting in Plymouth Wednesday, 2 to 4 p.m.

The Northwest Atlantic Marine Alliance is the group spearheading Wednesday’s demonstration, which is scheduled for 2 to 4 p.m. outside the fisheries council meeting at the Radisson hotel on Water Street in Plymouth. Stephen Welch, who lives in Hanover and fishes out of Scituate and Hyannis, plans to be at Wednesday’s demonstration. “I used to have two boats and eight employees. Now I have one boat and one employee,” said Welch, a member of Northwest Atlantic Marine Alliance, a fishermen-led organization. Read the rest here 07:52

Niaz Dorry of Northwest Atlantic Marine Alliance – Top 10 Myths About Seafood, Fisheries, and Marine Conservation

To me, from the start it was these similarities that were the untold story of the ocean and fisheries work. Some of the items on the list – like #1 – were clear to me from day one. Others emerged as I learned more. My convictions about this list are a manifestation of my instincts that are often reinforced through experience and information. 10. We need stability, so we can’t change the current system. This is code word for maintaining status quo. In some ways, they are right; we can’t change the current system. At least not in ways that will matter, so at some point we will need to start from scratch. It’s like a bad batch of dough. Nothing you do is going to fix it. In the end, you’ll have a loaf of brick. Time to start anew. And this time,,, Read the rest here 15:17

Being ignored at the Council or being publicly called an “asshole” by the Council Chairman doesn’t often make the news

nefmc_feb1Catch Shares Take Toll Council Called To Task – At the April New England Fishery Management Council meeting in Mystic, Conn., a dozen university students from New England, members of fishing families, other fishing organizations, and community organizer Brett Tolley were in attendance. About a dozen people among this group wore orange “Who Fishes Matters” T-shirts. Continue reading  An Open Letter to Tom Nies from a Fishing Family Member – Dear Mr. Nies, As Executive Director of the New England Fishery Management Council you should know how fishermen and the public experience the Council’s so-called “democratic process.” Read the letter here 18:10

‘Who Fishes Matters Tour’ comes to Portsmouth

PORTSMOUTH — The Who Fishes Matters Tour is coming to the Port City tonight. “In every industry where consolidation has taken place, we have seen rapid signs of ecological, social and economic degradation. The fishing industry is proving to be no different,” said Brett Tolley of the Northwest Atlantic Marine Alliance. “Most at risk are the fish and the family fishermen, particularly those with the smallest ecological footprint and less capital to buy or lease access to fisheries.” Read more