Tag Archives: Oceana Canada

Disappointed by cut to cod quota, FFAW president says stocks can handle larger harvest

The president of Newfoundland and Labrador’s largest fishermen’s union says the province’s cod stocks can handle a greater harvest and didn’t need to see this year’s commercial quota cut. Keith Sullivan of the Fish, Food & Allied Workers’ Union told CBC Radio’s The Broadcast that the 25 per cent cut to this year’s quota will hurt Newfoundland and Labrador communities that are heavily reliant on the fishery. “It doesn’t really take into consideration the livelihoods what people depend on the fishery, whether you’re a fish harvester or you work in a plant or the entire economy of coastal communities,” said Sullivan. >click to read<20:13

Fisheries Act must include legal duty to rebuild stocks: Oceana Canada

For the first time since the Fisheries Act was created in 1868, there are provisions within it that focus on the rebuilding of fish stocks. But as they’re currently worded, they fall short of what international experience has shown is required to actually help a stock rebuild.  Simply, they must mandate that the federal government respond, not just consider responding. That was the word from Josh Laughren, executive director of Oceana Canada, at the House fisheries committee earlier today. He said the language contained in Bill C-68 will also have to go further if it’s going to fulfil Canada’s international agreements and ensure this country’s laws are commensurate with other nations. >click to read<16:06

ENGO Oceana Canada says Canada’s fishery’s are in severe decline

cod_fisherman_la_poile_canadaA leading ocean conservation group sounded an alarm over the state of Canada’s fishery Thursday in a new report that reveals that less than 25 per cent of the country’s fish stocks are considered healthy and the status of almost half is unknown. In the most comprehensive public study ever conducted on the state of Canada’s fish, the report outlines the extent to which overfishing and decades of poor management practices have severely depleted Canada’s fish populations. The status of a whopping 45 per cent of stocks couldn’t be determined due to an absence of basic or up-to-date information, which the report attributed to a lack of transparency in Canada’s fisheries. The report called the latter a “long-standing problem, exacerbated by the previous federal government’s cuts to Canada’s once world-class fisheries science capacity and by the rigorously enforced policy of discouraging scientists from speaking about their work. Read the rest here, and hang on. 20:40