Tag Archives: Oregon

‘Waves of tears’

When Angie Chase got the phone call that a fishing boat had flipped near the Tillamook coast, she “just knew.” Todd Chase was on the fishing boat that capsized near the mouth of Tillamook Bay on Saturday. He was one of the two fishermen who died. They raised their four boys — Zach, Cord, Bowen and Brayden — in Tillamook and Astoria. Cord looks most like his father, but as his brother Brayden explains, each brother takes after their father in one way or another. “We have the waves of lots of tears, and we have moments of laughter, and moments of reflection,” Angie said. Video, >click to read< 09:16

A Fundraiser for Commercial Fisherman Todd Chase – Supporting Chase Family

Please support my sister and her boys after the tragic loss of Todd Chase, beloved husband, father, and friend to so many. Todd Chase was among the four local fishermen on the Coastal Reign that capsized 2/20 in Garibaldi, OR. His body was recovered on the jetty rocks. One of the best men in this world was lost too soon yesterday evening. He is survived by his wife Angie Chase, his four boys, Zach, Cord, Bowen, and Brayden Chase. He also had so many family and friends in Oregon. He will be deeply missed. Jacque Jacobsen is organizing this fundraiser  >click to read, and please donate if you can< 08:04

F/V Coastal Reign: At least one has been declared dead after fishing boat capsized along Oregon Coast

At least one of four crew members pulled from a capsized fishing boat on Saturday has died, according to the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG). A 38-foot fishing boat capsized at about 4:40 p.m. at the Tillamook Bay bar entrance, just a few miles south of Rockaway Beach. A representative for the Coast Guard said within about half an hour, rescue crews were able to retrieve all four people who were on board. Two of the four people were unresponsive,,, The USCG confirmed Sunday one had been declared dead soon after the rescue. Another was flown to a hospital in Portland for more care. >click to read< 15:03

Fishing boat capsizes near Tillamook coast – 2 of the 4 rescued were unresponsive

A 38-foot fishing boat capsized near the mouth of the Tillamook bay at around 4:40 p.m. Saturday,,, All four people aboard the vessel were rescued but two were unresponsive. They were all transported to local hospitals. The boat is still overturned on the south jetty at the Tillamook bar entrance. Tillamook County Sheriff’s Office deputies are assisting the Coast Guard with the incident. photo’s, >click to read<  4 rescued after boat capsizes   near Tillamook bar – Four people were on board. Coast Guard crews initially only pulled three people from the water and put out an alert that a fourth was missing. Within the hour, the last crewmember was found. >click to read<,and >click here< 10:26, Four recovered after fishing boat capsizes at Tillamook Bay bar entrance – The U.S. Coast Guard recovered four people, two who were unresponsive,  on Saturday after a 38-foot commercial fishing boat capsized at the Tillamook Bay bar entrance. The Coast Guard was watching the F/V Coastal Reign as the Warrenton-based vessel crossed the bar. >click to read<

Federal lease allows Oregon State’s offshore wave energy testing facility to move ahead in 2021

The lease for PacWave South is the first marine renewable energy research lease the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management has issued in federal waters off the West Coast. The estimated $80 million facility will be located offshore southwest of Newport, Oregon. The project still must receive licensing approval from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission before it can move forward. Obtaining the lease is an essential component of the licensing requirements. >click to read< 12:22

Oregon commercial crab fishery to open north of Cape Falcon Feb. 16

This area has remained closed to commercial crabbing to coordinate an orderly start with the Washington coastal Dungeness crab fishery. Results from recent domoic acid testing of crab viscera (guts) conducted by the state of Washington indicate that levels of the marine biotoxin domoic acid are still elevated in the viscera of crab. Until further notice, all crab harvested from Point Chehalis, Wash. to the Washington/Oregon border will be required to have the viscera (guts) removed ,,,  Prior to the opener, crab vessels in this area will be allowed to set gear from Feb. 13 onwards, >click to read< 07:43

New crab boat faces the harsh realities of a tough season

The commercial Dungeness crab season is well underway and there’s a new boat in town. When a retired school teacher looking for a hobby and well-established fishermen in Charleston get together, a boat is built. “He said he just bought some plans and he showed them to me, and they were exactly the kind of boat I was looking for,” said Bill Lucero, an owner of the Michelle Marie Fishing Vessel. “So, one thing led to another and we decided to build this boat.” video, photos, >click to read< 08:06

Coast Guard Motor Lifeboat Victory placed on restricted duty

For more than 60 years, one name was the best hope for large commercial vessels stranded or imperiled at sea off the central Oregon coast. Victory. The 52-foot motor lifeboat Victory came to Newport’s Station Yaquina Bay in 1956 (although it remained nameless until the 1970s). It was the first of four steel 52-foot vessels built by the U.S. Coast Guard to replace its aging wooden lifeboats, Invincible and Triumph, and was joined in the early 1960s by the Intrepid, Invincible II and Triumph II, stationed at Grays Harbor, Coos Bay and Cape Disappointment, respectively. The four boats are the only named vessels smaller than 65 feet in the guard’s fleet. “Right now, we’ve basically restricted the use of all four of our 52-foot special weather boats here in the Pacific Northwest,” >click to read< 11:18

Stanley Clarence Hasbrouck of Tillamook, Oregon, has passed away

Stanley C. Hasbrouck, loving father of six, passed away on Jan. 7, 2021 at the age of 88. Stan was born on May 3, 1932 to Fred and May Hasbrouck, he was the youngest of 5 children. He joined the army in 1952 and served his country during the Korean War. Stanley was a commercial fisherman most of his life. He was also a mechanic, heavy equipment operator and the airport manager in Dutch Harbor, Alaska. >click to read< 09:55

It’s good to see crab season finally underway

The people who make up the commercial crabbing fleet work in some of the worst weather Mother Nature can throw at them. And this year is proving to be no different. The area is experiencing some pretty heavy rainfall, and during the first part of this week, there was also a high wind warning and a high surf advisory. Crabbing is generally a lucrative fishery, but they certainly earn their pay. We offer prayers for a safe and bountiful harvest for all of them. Speaking of the fishing industry,,, >click to read< 07:14

Del Norte County commercial fishermen will drop their pots Thursday

The first Dungeness crab of the season is expected to hit Citizens Dock on Saturday,,, Following a meeting Monday morning, fishermen in Oregon and California and wholesalers agreed on $2.75 per pound of Dungeness crab,,, Seafood processors, including Pacific Choice Seafood, Bornsteins Seafoods and Hallmark Fisheries had offered $2.50 per pound,,, The discussion Monday involved fishermen in Brookings, Crescent City, Trinidad, Eureka and Fort Bragg, Shepherd said. Fishermen agreed to set their pots starting at 8 a.m. Thursday for a 48-hour soak and bring their catch in on Saturday, he said. >click to read< 07:39

Rough Seas Delaying Crab Pot Deployment – A gale warning from the Eureka office of the National Weather Service, in effect now until 3 a.m. Wednesday from Point St. George to Cape Mendocino, states “strong winds will cause hazardous seas which could capsize or damage vessels and reduce visibility.” >click to read<

Oregon: Dungeness crab season a go as fisherman, California Crab Fishermen Reduce Asking Price

After more than three weeks on strike, commercial Dungeness crab fishermen accepted an offer of $2.75 from Oregon processors. But Pacific Seafood’s offer has strings attached. “All the boats that are delivering to Pac Choice have to deliver their first two offloads to Pac Choice guaranteed,” said Tyler Leach “Which means they can’t go to an alive buyer, they can’t go to anybody else whose offering a better price at that point in time.” The fleet was hoping to be offered upward of $3,,, “We sat for a very long time so hopefully it will go up shortly after we get fishing.” >click to read< 07:50

California Crab Fishermen Reduce Asking Price To $3.10; Representative for Processors Says COVID-19 Effects On Dungeness Market Continue>click to read<

Oregon: Commercial Dungeness crab fishermen reject another offer from processor

Commercial Dungeness crab fishermen declined another offer from Pacific Seafood on Wednesday.,, It’s been three weeks since the commercial Dungeness crab season started. With prices still in question, boats continue to float at the docks. Russell’s Marine Fuel and Supply hasn’t sold fuel to the commercial fleet in two weeks. “Everybody can be off work for a month, but you start getting into month two, month three and you do start seeing that effect,” says operations manager Curtis Green. >click to read< 07:04

What? No Fresh Oregon Crab? Oregon crab fleet remains in port 2 weeks after open of Dungeness season

The commercial Dungeness crab season, Oregon’s most valuable fishery, opened at 12:01 a.m. on December 16. Two weeks later, the fleet remains tied up in port as crabbers and processors squabble over a price. Both Pacific Seafood and Hallmark Fishers have offered $2.50 per pound. Crabbers started at $3.30 but reduced their offer to $3.20 earlier this week. So far, no deal. And that means: so far, no fresh Oregon Dungeness crab. Crab boat captains have speculated that processors have decreased demand due to restaurant closures,,, >click to read< 17:05

Oregon: Commercial Dungeness crab season not starting as fishermen hoped

Wednesday signifies the official start of the commercial Dungeness crab season, but it’s not starting out the way fishermen had hoped. This is the day they would normally be pulling crab pots out of the water and getting crab to the processors. But the boats are all still tied to the docks. That’s because market prices are still in question. Two processors have put an offer on the table of $2.50/pound, but Pacific,,, >click to read< 20:39

Dungeness Crab Season opens Dec.16th From Cape Falcon to the California border!

Fishing vessels can start setting gear for the pre-soak period as soon as Dec. 13 and see their first pulls hit the docks on opening day. The season is normally scheduled to open Dec. 1, but is often delayed for quality assurance reasons and toxin testing. Testing this year showed a low meat yield in crab specimens, prompting the two-week delay to allow the crabs to fill with meat. Last year’s opening day was delayed until Dec. 31 for similar reasons. Domoic acid levels in crab across the coast were found to be safe for human consumption,,, >click to read< 12:55

Delay in Dungeness crab season the latest in long string of delayed seasons

The Oregon Dungeness crab season has been delayed two weeks with a start date now set for December 16. It’s the latest in a long string of delayed seasons. The season start date is supposed to be December 1, but for six consecutive seasons it’s been delayed. “It’s a moving goalpost all the time with the Dungeness crab fishery and yeah, I guess were used to waiting here because the state makes the decision when we get to open the season,” says Nick Edwards, owner of F/V Carter Jon. >video, lick to read< 10:36

A thriving fishing industry

An article on the front page of the Aug. 4, 1966, Western World told the story. “Fishing activity in the Port of Bandon has definitely been on the increase during the past two weeks, reports Graydon Stinnett, owner of Bandon Seafood Market. “From an average of 21 fishing boats per day in July, mid-week count yesterday indicated 50 boats, and this number is apt to be raised by five or more per day, while the present season is in progress, said Stinnett. “Attracting a large number of California fishermen, Stinnett is now working at a peak capacity,,, >click to read< 08:13

“Challenging,” “Inconsistent,” “Strange” – Rotten tuna season comes to a close

It’s been a stinky season for Washington and Oregon commercial tuna fishermen. The final albacore tuna landings are offloading at local ports this week, ending was has been a tough overall 2020 fishery. “Challenging,” “Inconsistent,” “Strange” and “Worst ever” are some of the words used to sum up the season by local processors, commercial and recreational fishermen. Catch coast wide this season has been about two-thirds of the 20-year average, according to Western Fishboat Owners Association Executive Director Wayne Heikkila, who monitors the commercial tuna fishing season coast wide from California to Washington as part of non-profit group representing 400 albacore fishermen on the West Coast. photos,  >click to read< 18:25

Crab industry, Oregon continue plans to avoid whale entanglement

New regulations for commercial Dungeness crab fishermen in Oregon aim to get boats on the water earlier in the season and reduce the amount of gear to avoid tangling with endangered whales. “Our fleet is made up of 400 individual businesspeople who each bring a different perspective to the issue,” said Hugh Link, the executive director of the Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission. “For over three years, they have been given the opportunity to weigh in on how best to mitigate the whale entanglement risk,” he continued. “But it is an ongoing process. These upcoming meetings are the next important step and we hope they take the opportunity to have their voices heard.”

A Stunning Transformation: More Than a New Shell

Like many fishermen, Justin Yager has a strong interest in responsible harvesting. Similarly, he saw the common sense of rebuilding the Gulf shrimper BJ Thomas after the boat had a serious fire at Newport, Oregon. Built in 1976 at Marine Builders in Mobile, Alabama the boat found its way to the west coast where Justin’s wife, Sara’s grandfather, owned it for some time before selling it on to the next generation. Justin fished the boat for a few years with the crab and shrimp permits that the couple also purchased from Sara’s grandfather. The fire was the impetus for the rebuild that the owners had planned for the boat. ‘We cut off the bow, part of the stern, and the house. We took it right down to the engine room and the fish holds he explained. photos, >click to read< 12:05

In Coastal Oregon, Fishing Gear Makers Strive for Sustainability

Sara Skamser makes and modifies commercial fishing nets in Newport, Oregon. The co-owner of Foulweather Trawl got her start in the commercial fishing business  as a crew member on small crab and salmon boats. Net skills, like sewing and splicing, became one more thing to help Sara land a gig. “In the late 70s and early 80s, I was bucking to get on a big boat,”,,, That dream hit a dead end when Sara asked some of Newport’s larger operations to let her join their crews. “These guys just absolutely turned purple,” she says. “And so the bottom line to that is I invoice those people now,” she laughs., About a half hour south on the coastal highway, Leonard Van Curler is also making fishing gear. Some of the tools he uses are similar to Sara’s, such as the shuttle-like “needle” he uses to knit mesh. But what he’s making are crab pots,,, >click to read< 15:43

In Newport, a coronavirus outbreak spreads to local economy

Pacific Seafood ceased operations at all five of its Newport plants. The Oregon Health Authority said the outbreak is contained to Lincoln County and that risk to the public is low. But Newport Mayor Dean Sawyer said most of those who tested positive are locals. The town’s economy is hurting again without a major fish buyer and supplier. And businesses are shutting back down to try to slow the spread of the virus. “They live here, they work here, they’re community-based people,” Sawyer said. “And, of course, the problem with that is that people live and work with people that work in other industries.” >click to read< 12:16

Oregon Fishing Industry Tells Lawmakers Of Economic Hardships – Murkowski pushes for an another Billion in federal fisheries relief funds

The coronavirus has hit Oregon’s commercial fishing industry hard. That was the message to state lawmakers during a recent meeting of the House Interim Committee on Natural Resources. Anthony Dal Ponte is with Pacific Seafood, which is based in Clackamas and has several facilities on the Oregon coast. He said the company had to lay off more than 500 employees after their restaurant and hospitality industry markets dried up virtually overnight. >click to read<  Meanwhile, Murkowski pushes for an additional $1 billion in federal fisheries relief funds – Additional money could    be on the way for the fishing industry. Senator Lisa Murkowski said that she is working to add more fisheries funding in the next round of pandemic relief legislation. “As we think about the impact to our fisheries, $50 million is not going to be sufficient to address the need,” she said. “I have been working with colleagues to urge us in this next round of relief to include $1 billion in fishery assistance funds.” >click to read< 15:07

Salmon fishermen in Oregon to face brief closure that could help them later in the year

The commercial salmon season started just two weeks ago, but Tuesday is your last day to fish until the season opens up again May 26th. The executive director of the Oregon Salmon Commission says the season normally sees closures but at a different time. Because of the coronavirus pandemic, fishermen are catching Chinoock salmon but having a hard time selling them. That was behind the push to change the closure time from Cape Falcon south to the California border for this season. “Were basically closed for the markets in May,” said Nancy Fitzpatrick, the executive director of the Oregon Salmon Commission. “But it gave us more open days in July and August when we might typically be closed.” >click to read< 08:54

Coronavirus: Restaurant Closures Put Oregon Seafood Industry In Limbo

Commercial fisherman Clint Funderburg should be on the ocean right now, catching Dungeness crab on his fishing boat, the Widgeon. When crab prices tanked a few weeks ago, he shifted gears to his off-season side gig. So, he’s building a refrigeration system for one of the many fishing boats that are stuck at the dock right now. Mandatory restaurant closures during the coronavirus pandemic have sent shock waves through Oregon’s $700 million seafood industry. The overwhelming majority of the seafood that lands on Oregon’s docks gets eaten in restaurants, and no one knows when that market will return. In the meantime, fishermen are parking their boats as seafood prices plummet. >click to read< 18:04

Dungeness crab: Central California numbers rise to average of five times that of past decades

Fishermen from California to Washington caught almost all the available legal-size male Dungeness crab each year in the last few decades. However, the crab population has either remained stable or continued to increase, according to the first thorough population estimate of the West Coast Dungeness stocks. “The catches and abundance in Central California especially are increasing, which is pretty remarkable to see year after year,” The secret to the success of the Dungeness crab fishery may be the way fishing regulations protect the crab populations’ reproductive potential.  >click to read< 14:34

Feds reject removal of 4 US Northwest dams

The four dams on the lower Snake River are part of a vast and complex hydroelectric power system operated by the federal government in Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana. The massive dams, built in eastern Washington between 1961 and 1975, are at the center of a years-long battle that pits the fate of two iconic Pacific Northwest species — the salmon and the killer whale — against the need for plentiful, carbon-free power for the booming region.,, Snake River sockeye were the first species in the Columbia River Basin listed under the Endangered Species Act in 1991. Now, 13 salmon runs are listed as federally endangered or threatened. Four of those runs return to the Snake River. >click to read< 08:17

Sea lions are cash cows in the Bay Area. Farther south, fishermen say, ‘Shoot ‘em’

Sea lions are increasingly living in parallel universes along the California coast, a disparity best observed amid the noisy, stinking spectacle that rolls out daily at San Francisco’s Pier 39 shopping center. There, hundreds of these enormous, mostly male California sea lions bark, defecate, urinate and regurgitate, but are immensely popular with tourists.,, Officials in Washington, Oregon and Idaho are so irate at marauding sea lions that they have asked for federal permission to shoot certain ones identified as feasting on salmon and steelhead,,, >click to read< 10:01

Water Under the Bridge: Dec. 24, 2019 – 10 years ago this week, 2009 in Oregon

Derrick Ray has survived two divorces and 23 grueling winters crabbing in the Bering Sea. He steered boats through 40-foot breakers and stayed up for five days straight — watching imaginary pink elephants fall from the sky — while his boat pulled in a half-million-dollar haul of king crab.Thirty-five years of commercial fishing has taken a toll,,, and other stories, >click to read< 06:36