Tag Archives: P.E.I. fishermen

Fishermen finding carapace increase hard to swallow

Fishermen returning to port in Miminegash on Wednesday were not so much concerned with the size of their catch as they were with what they were throwing over. “It’s scary,” said Peter Hustler, a fisherman’s helper with captain Michael Myers. He estimated the amount of lobsters he had to return that would have been legal size last year, would have meant eight to 10 more pans of canners. The carapace measure was increased by two millimeters this year following a one-mm increase last year, and Myers had plenty to say about that. “The measure is not going to prove out,” he said, suggesting Federal Fisheries Minister Dominic LeBlanc should have listened to P.E.I. fishermen’s pleas and trimmed the carapace increase to just a millimeter this year. click here to read the story 11:35

New safety regulations frustrating Island fishermen

Some P.E.I. fishermen say new federal safety rules that came into effect Thursday has forced them to spend thousands of dollars unnecessarily. Under the new Transport Canada regulations unveiled in 2016, fishing vessels are required to have specific safety gear on board, including a life rafts, survival suits and a location signaling device.,,, “Nobody wants to be seen as anti-safety,” explained one fisherman. “But this isn’t about safety, it’s about reasonability.” “We’ll spend $5,000, and never need [the gear],” said another. “I can understand if you’re fishing on your own 50 miles out. But for us, there’s always 10 boats within a two mile radius.  If you’re in trouble, by the time you get out the gear, somebody is next to you.” click here to read the story 13:08

P.E.I. Fishermen hope for the best – first lobsters of the 2017 season will be hauled in on Monday

P.E.I. Lobster fishermen will be crossing their fingers as they head out onto the waters this morning for the first landing day of the 2017 fishery. Long-time fisherman, Norman Peters, also known as the Bearded Skipper, went out from North Rustico Saturday on his boat Silver Wave with his brother Keith and son Corey. Peters, who has been fishing for longer than 55 years, said the day went well, although it was impossible to tell what the landings will be like. Like many others, Peters was remaining cautiously optimistic. “We’ll have to wait and see,” said the 75-year-old Peters. “No doubt there’s going to be lobster, a pound or two to a trap would be nice, but whatever we get, we get.” click here to read the story 08:11

P.E.I. lobster levy will launch this spring

When the lobster fishery begins this spring, P.E.I. will become the first province in the region where a two-cent-per-pound levy will be collected. The levy will take one cent per pound from P.E.I. fishermen for lobster they bring in and another cent per pound from the buyers. The money will be used for marketing. Nova Scotia and New Brunswick are expected to launch their own levies in 2017. A lobster marketing board — comprised of six executives from the P.E.I. Fishermen’s Association (PEIFA) and six lobster fishermen — has been established to decide how to spend the harvesters’ half of the money. Read the story here 08:06

Low-interest loan expands to all lobster fishermen, ‘Takes pressure off’ P.E.I. fishermen, says association president

863a4ac9dc_64635696_o2In an ideal world, the loan program wouldn’t be needed because fishermen would be making enough money, said Mike McGeoghegan, president of the P.E.I. Fishermen’s Association. However, the announcement comes as welcome news, he said. Read [email protected]  07:54

P.E.I. fishermen, processors still in disagreement about price of lobster

The Canadian Press – CHARLOTTETOWN — A meeting between Prince Edward Island fishermen and seafood processors ended in frustration Sunday as the contentious dispute over the price of lobster continued. Michael McGeoghegan, president P.E.I. Fishermen’s Association, said his organization could not reach an agreement with the P.E.I. Seafood Processors Association after meeting in Charlottetown for about two and a half hours. continued