Tag Archives: Pacific Fishery Management Council

Good Lord. Pacific Fishery Management Council Closes 200 Miles Of West Coast To Salmon Fishing

About 200 miles of the West Coast will be closed to ocean salmon fishing this year to protect a record-low run of Klamath River chinook. Fishery managers with the Pacific Fishery Management Council voted Tuesday for a total closure of ocean salmon seasons from southern Oregon to northern California. Commercial troll fishing seasons will be closed from Florence, Oregon, to Horse Mountain, which is south of Eureka, California. Sport fishing seasons will be closed from Humbug Mountain south of Port Orford, Oregon, to Horse Mountain in northern California. The rest of the coast will have limited fishing seasons. West Coast salmon runs have been hit hard in recent years by drought conditions in their native rivers and El Niño conditions in the Pacific Ocean that reduce their food sources. While fishermen up and down the coast are in for a tough year, those who depend on Klamath River salmon are already calling for help. Fishing groups and Native American tribes plan to ask California Gov. Jerry Brown to declare a fishing disaster so they can receive federal assistance. click here to read the story 18:03

California likely to shorten chinook salmon season

With chinook salmon at its lowest population in years, West Coast fishery managers are considering a proposal to strictly limit the commercial season and to delay its start around the San Francisco Bay from its usual May date to August. A final decision will be made on Tuesday. “You’re probably going to find it only in your upscale grocery stores and upscale restaurants, and it’s not going to be always available. It’s probably not going to be cheap,” said Dave Bitts, a Eureka fisherman and adviser to the Pacific Fishery Management Council, which manages fisheries in the federal waters off California, Oregon and Washington. Click here to read the story 08:55

Pacific sardine fishery closed for the third year in a row

The Pacific Fishery Management Council on April 10 announced the continued closure of the Pacific sardine directed fishery through June 30, 2018. This is the third annual closure in a row for this fishery. Council members heard from scientists that the abundance forecast for the 2017-18 season, scheduled to start July 1, was significantly below the 150,000 metric ton threshold for a directed fishery. They also considered testimony from fishery participants and environmental groups before reaching a decision to close the directed fishery. click here to read the story 19:33

D.B. Pleschner: Study: No correlation between forage fish, predator populations

On April 9-10, the Pacific Fishery Management Council is meeting in Sacramento to deliberate on anchovy management and decide on 2017 harvest limits for sardine, two prominent west coast forage fish. Extreme environmental groups like Oceana and Pew have plastered social media with allegations that the anchovy population has crashed, sardines are being overfished and fisheries should be curtailed, despite ample evidence to the contrary. Beyond multiple lines of recent evidence that both sardines and anchovy populations are increasing in the ocean, a new study published this week in the journal Fisheries Research finds that the abundance of these and other forage fish species is driven primarily by environmental cycles with little impact from fishing, and well-managed fisheries have a negligible impact on predators — such as larger fish, sea lions and seabirds. This finding flies directly in the face of previous assumptions prominent in a 2012 study commissioned by the Lenfest Ocean Program, funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts, heirs of Sun Oil Company. The Lenfest study concluded that forage fish are twice as valuable when left in the water to be eaten by predators and recommended slashing forage fishery catch rates by 50 to 80 percent. click here to continue reading the article 20:39

Pacific Fishery Management Council meeting in Sacramento April 6-11, 2017

The Pacific Fishery Management Council and its advisory bodies will meet April 6-11, 2017 in Sacramento, Ca. at the DoubleTree by Hilton Sacramento to address issues related to salmon, groundfish, coastal pelagic species, Pacific halibut, and habitat matters. For agenda item topics, please click to see the April 2017 meeting notice with a detailed agenda. The Council meeting will be live‐streamed. Click here to Listen to the Live Audio Stream For more details, click here 19:58

Commercial fishermen on south coast fear salmon season could be cut short

Commercial fishermen on the south coast say they’re worried this year’s fishing season could be cut short or even become obsolete. According to the Pacific Fishery Management Council, salmon numbers are down the past couple of years and this year doesn’t look to be much better.  “If the fish don’t show, our season–salmon season–would be over and a lot of guys will make very little money,” said one fisherman of 42 years at a public meeting Monday night. “A lot of markets, restaurants won’t have salmon.” The PFMC took public comment Monday in Coos Bay on proposals for the season and talked about the effect on the salmon fishery. Click here to watch video, read the rest here 17:50

PFMC: Ocean salmon fishing options unveiled

Ocean salmon fishing season this summer off the Washington and northern Oregon coasts likely will be similar or slightly better than in 2016. The Pacific Fishery Management Council on Monday in Vancouver adopted three options for ocean seasons. Following a series of public meetings in Washington, Oregon and California, the council will select a final alternative April 6 through 11 in Sacramento, Calif. Here is a look at how the three options would apply for the Columbia River ports of Ilwaco, Chinook, Hammond, Astoria and Warrenton: Read the rest here 10:39

The Pacific Fishery Management Council meeting in Vancouver, Washington. March 7-13, 2017

The Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) and its advisory bodies will meet March 7-13, 2017 in Vancouver, Washington. Advisory bodies will start Tuesday, March 7. The Council session will start on Wednesday, March 8 to address issues related to salmon, groundfish, highly migratory species, ecosystem, Pacific halibut, and habitat matters. For agenda item topics, please see the March 2017 meeting agenda. The March 2017 Council meeting will be live‐streamed. Click http://www.gotomeeting.com/online/webinar/join-webinar Enter the Webinar ID – The March 8-13, 2017 Webinar ID is: 897-986-459 Please enter your email address (required) Click here for details 20:43

Ocean conditions appear improving for salmon

Warm water temperatures in the north Pacific Ocean are starting to cool after three years, but their effect on Northwest salmon will persist for another year or two. “Strange times, but things are looking up, that’s the message,’’ said Marisa Litz of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. Litz made her comments on Tuesday at the agency’s annual unveiling of Columbia River, coastal and Puget Sound salmon forecasts. She recently completed her doctorate from Oregon State University in Fisheries Science, focusing on how variable ocean conditions affect growth and survival of young salmon in the Northwest. Tuesday’s meeting began a six-week process that concludes with the Pacific Fishery Management Council adopting ocean salmon fishing seasons in mid-April. continue reading the story here 11:31

D.B. Pleschner: ENGO Extremists manufacture anchovy ‘crisis’ where none exists

northern anchovyWhen the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) recently reapproved the 2017 annual catch limit for the central stock of anchovy at 25,000 metric tons (mt), environmental extremists immediately cried foul. Press releases with doomsday headlines claimed that the anchovy catch limit is now higher than the total population of fish in the sea. Environmentalists claim the anchovy resource has “collapsed” and the current catch limit is dangerously high. But is the anchovy population really decimated, or are these alarmists simply manufacturing another anti-fishing crisis? In reality, anchovies are now amazingly abundant from San Diego to Northern California. Scientific data as well as fishermen’s observation bear this out: Read the op-ed here 12:22

Pacific Fishery Management Council Meeting in Garden Grove, California November 15 – 21

PFMC Sidebar

The Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) and its advisory bodies will meet starting Sunday, November 13, 2016 in Garden Grove, California. Advisory bodies will start Sunday, November 13.  The Council session will start on Wednesday, November 16, 2016 to address issues related to salmon, groundfish, highly migratory species, coastal pelagic species, Pacific halibut, and habitat matters. Click here to read the Agenda. Click here to listen to the Live Audio Stream 19:37

Pacific Council on proposed Marine Monument

Today, the pfmc waterPacific Fishery Management Council sent a letter to President Obama expressing concern about “how these National Monument designations would impact our fishery management efforts in the west coast Exclusive Economic Zone.” In it, the Council stresses: 1. All of the areas proposed for designation already have significant protections from specific fishing activities.  For example – Essential Fish Habitat requirements under the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act; and Cowcod Conservation Areas off the Southern California coast. 2. Fishery management decisions are best done in a thoroughly transparent public process rather than being done with limited involvement of certain stakeholders. 3. The social and economic importance of those areas cannot be understated. Read the letter from the PFMC, and the letter from the Council Coordination Committee by clicking here 07:44

Pacific Fishery Management Council Meeting in Tacoma, Washington June 21-28, 2016 Listen Live

PFMC SidebarThe Pacific Fishery Management Council and its advisory bodies will meet June 21‐28, 2016 in Tacoma, Washington at Hotel Murano, 1320 Broadway Plaza, Tacoma, WA 98402. Download the June 2015 Meeting Notice WITH Agenda (includes full logistics for public comment deadlines). Listen to the Live Audio Stream  Enter the Webinar ID – The June 23-28, 2016 Webinar ID is: 157-423-659 Please enter your email address (required) http://www.pcouncil.org/ 17:56

D.B. Pleschner: Pacific Sardines are not collapsing, may be in recovery

pacific sardineOn April 10, the Pacific Fishery Management Council closed the West Coast sardine fishery for a second straight year. The council followed its ultra-conservative harvest control policy and relied on a stock assessment that does not account for recent sardine recruitment. But in fact, there are multiple lines of evidence that young sardines are now abundant in the ocean. In addition to field surveys, fishermen in both California and the Pacific Northwest have been observing sardines – both small and large — since the summer of 2015. And California fishermen also provided samples of the small fish to federal and state fishery managers. Read the rest here 19:29

As Pacific sardine collapse worsens, scientists worry about possible ripple in the ecosystem

pacific sardineNearly a year into a West Coast sardine fishing ban enacted to protect the collapsing population, the fish formerly worth more than $8 million to Oregon’s economy have shown no signs of a comeback. New federal research indicates numbers of the small, silvery, schooling fish have plummeted further than before the fishing moratorium, dashing any hope of lifting it in 2016. With the current sardine population hovering at 7 percent of its 2007 peak, fishermen now say they expect to wait a decade or more to revive the fishery. “I don’t want to take a pessimistic view, but I would think we’ll be shut down until 2030,” said Ryan Kapp, a Bellingham, Washington, fisherman who advises the Pacific Fishery Management Council on sardines and other fish. Read the article here 15:33

Ocean salmon seasons set by PFMC, pending NMFS final approval

20140891-largeThe Pacific Fishery Management Council struggled through week-long negotiations over widely contrasting salmon outlooks before setting sport and commercial rules for coastal Oregon, Washington and California on Thursday afternoon. Its decisions still require approval by the National Marine Fisheries Service. Chinook salmon fishing will be allowed from all ports, with reduced commercial seasons bearing the brunt of cutbacks in southerly waters. The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission will adopt ocean salmon regulations for state waters at its April 22 meeting in Bandon. The commission typically matches regulations set by the Management Council. Read the article here 11:19

West Coast sardine fishery shutdown continues for 2nd year

pacific sardineWest coast sardine fishermen for a second straight season will have to keep their boats moored or find something else to catch. The Pacific Fishery Management Council on Sunday closed the sardine fishery off Oregon, California and Washington following the second straight year of sardine population estimates that fall below the minimum abundance required to allow fishing. There are fewer than 65,000 metric tons adult sardines in the ocean this year, federal scientists estimated. West coast fishery rules require sardine fishing to cease once the adult stock drops below 150,000 metric tons. Read the article here 11:58

Pacific Fishery Management Council Meeting in Vancouver, Washington April 8-14, 2016

PFMC SidebarThe Pacific Fishery Management Council and its advisory bodies will meet April 8-14, 2016 in Vancouver, Washington, at Hilton Vancouver Washington. Download the June 2015 Meeting Notice WITH Agenda (includes full logistics for public comment deadlines). Listen to the Live Audio Stream, Enter your email, and the Webinar ID – The April 8-14, 2016 Webinar ID is: 105-442-547. 13:56

Salmon fishing season likely to be shorter in 2016

North Coast fishermen may have plenty of free time on their hands this summer if regulators adopt any of three proposed alternatives for this year’s commercial salmon seasons. With the outlook suggesting diminished abundance of two key Chinook salmon runs, fishery managers have structured a season with lots of gaps, especially in the Fort Bragg region, where the fishery would be all or mostly closed in June and completely shut down in July. North Coast Rep. Jared Huffman, D-San Rafael, and other bay-delta representatives said the proposed cuts would reduce commercial fishing boats’ time on the water by at least 20 percent overall — and by up to 45 percent along a stretch of the North Coast from Point Arena to Horse Mountain, located north of Shelter Cove in Humboldt County. Read the rest here 11:22

Pacific Fishery Management Council considers closing ocean salmon seasons due to projected poor coho returns

Poor forecasts for returning coho salmon are prompting state and tribal fishery managers to consider closing all salmon fisheries in Washington’s ocean waters this year as part of a federal season-setting process for the West Coast. State, tribal and federal fishery managers have developed three options for non-treaty ocean salmon fisheries that reflect the anticipated low coho returns. Two options would permit some salmon fishing this year, but one would close recreational and commercial ocean fisheries for. Those alternatives were approved Sunday for public review by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC), which establishes fishing seasons in ocean waters three to 200 miles off the Pacific coast. A public hearing on the three alternatives for ocean salmon fisheries is scheduled for March 28 in Westport. Read the rest here 14:17

Pacific Fishery Management Council Meeting in Sacramento, California March 8-14, 2016 Listen Live

PFMC SidebarThe Pacific Fishery Management Council and its advisory bodies will meet June 10-16, 2015 in Spokane, Washington, at the DoubleTree by Hilton Sacramento. Download the June 2015 Meeting Notice WITH Agenda (includes full logistics for public comment deadlines). Listen to the Live Audio Stream March 9-14. 12:51

What’s eating at Dr. Ray Hilborn today?!! Dr. Geoff Shester from Oceana

CFOODLast week Dr. Geoff Shester, California campaign director for the nonprofit advocacy group Oceana criticized the Pacific Fishery Management Council for the persistence of low numbers of California Sardines. The lack of a population recovery may cause the commercial moratorium to last until 2017. The author explained this sardine population decline as being 93 percent less than it was in 2007. Dr. Shester does not believe this is because of environmental causes like climate change, El Nino, or natural fluctuations in forage fish species however – instead he blames the management body. “They warned of a population collapse and the fishery management body basically turned a blind eye and continued moving forward with business as usual.” Response Comment by Ray Hilborn, University of Washington, Read the rest here 11:49

Dan Bacher – Sacramento Salmon Ocean Abundance Forecast Is Half Of Last Year’s

800_bodega_bay_sceneryThe federal government last week released its data on the projections for the upcoming ocean and river salmon seasons in California and Southern Oregon — and it’s not looking good.  Commercial and recreational anglers are bracing for further fishing restrictions this season, based on relatively low abundance estimates for Sacramento River and Klamath River fall-run Chinook salmon, the two drivers of the West Coast fishery. The estimate of Sacramento River salmon that can be found in the ocean in 2016 is less than half of last year’s forecast of 652,000 fish. The Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC), a quasi-governmental body that crafts the seasons and regulations for salmon, groundfish and other fisheries,,, Read the rest here 11:01

West Coast sardine populations, long sinking, look even worse in forecast

pacific sardineSardines off the West Coast have continued on a steep decline, with populations this summer forecast to be down 93 percent from a 2007 peak, according to a draft assessment from the National Marine Fisheries Service. The sardines are a key forage food for sea lions, salmon and many other species, as well as a source of income for commercial fishermen. Last year, the sardine implosion was so severe that the Pacific Fishery Management Council voted to call off the season that was scheduled to start in July for West Coast fleets, including those in Washington state. Oceana shrew Geoff Shester throws his dogma into the conversation. Read the rest here 13:33

Pacific Seafood Group sues National Marine Fisheries Service – calling fishery quota restrictions illegal

California-based groundfish catcher and processor Pacific Seafood has sued the US government seeking to overturn what they say are “illegal” regulations that threaten the company’s future. A company subsidiary, Pacific Choice Seafoods, which operates a processing plant as well as vessels that fish the Pacific Coast groundfish limited-entry trawl fishery, filed suit on Dec. 4 in a northern California federal court against the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and its ultimate overseer, US commerce secretary Penny Pritzker. Read the article here 13:50

D.B. Pleschner: Anchovy collapse simply a manufactured ‘crisis’

northern anchovyIf you follow news about the Monterey Bay, you’ve undoubtedly heard the recent outcry by environmentalists in the media claiming the anchovy population in California has collapsed and the fishery must be closed immediately. The current controversy stems largely from a study funded by environmental interests that claims an apocalyptic decline of 99 percent of the anchovy population from 1951 to 2011. However, fishermen have seen a surge in anchovies in recent years. Read the rest here 20:19

Pacific Fishery Management Council and Enviro’s Cripple California Swordfish Driftnet Fleet.

The measure approved by the Pacific Fishery Management Council would cap at two over a two-year period the number of creatures such as sperm whales and loggerhead turtles that could be injured or killed after becoming entangled in gillnets, said Kit Dahl, staff officer with the council. The measure was lauded by environmentalists who have waged a years-long battle with gillnet fishermen who harvest swordfish mostly in Pacific waters off San Diego and Los Angeles. It was unclear how often fishermen capture endangered species in the gillnets. Read the rest here 20:19

The Pacific Fishery Management Council will meet September 9‐16, 2015 in Sacramento, California,

PFMC SidebarThe Pacific Fishery Management Council and its advisory bodies will meet September 9‐16, 2015 in Sacramento, California,  to address issues related to management of groundfish, highly migratory species, ecosystem management, salmon, Pacific halibut, and habitat matters. Download the September 9-16, 2015 Meeting Notice WITH Detailed Agenda (includes public comment deadlines and other logistic information) Download the September 9-16, 2015 Detailed Agenda (agenda only) Join the meeting  by visiting this link: Click here  Webinar ID is: 141-257-515   10:26

Pacific Fishery Management Council Meeting in Spokane, June 10-16, 2015

PFMC SidebarThe Pacific Fishery Management Council and its advisory bodies will meet June 10-16, 2015 in Spokane, Washington, at the DoubleTree by Hilton Spokane City Center. Download the June 2015 Meeting Notice WITH Agenda (includes full logistics for public comment deadlines) Download the June 2015 Agenda, Listen to the Live Audio Stream (starting on Friday, June 12, 2015) 21:06

West Coast sardine decline: Science vs. politics, By D.B. Pleschner

The federal Pacific Fishery Management Council has shut down the remainder of the current sardine season and has canceled the 2015-16 fishing season altogether. Fishermen supported this action. Why the closure? According to environmental groups like Oceana, it was to stop overfishing and save starving sea lions deprived of essential sardines. Neither reason is true, but many in the media have trumpeted this hyperbole put forth by groups whose political agenda is to shut down fishing completely. Read the rest here 08:40

Pacific Fishery Management Council votes to halt this seasons West Coast sardine fishery as soon as possible

PFMC SidebarMeeting outside Santa Rosa, California, the Pacific Fishery Management Council voted to halt the current season as early as possible, affecting about 100 fishing boats. The season normally would end June 30. Earlier this week, the council shut down the next sardine season, which was set to begin July 1.  The council did not take Wednesday’s decision lightly and understood the pain the closure would impose on the fishing industry, said council member Michele Culver, representing the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. Read the rest here 22:15

Valuable west coast fishery to close July 1

sardine shut downPoor recruitment, thought to be the result of unfavorable ocean conditions, has resulted in a perilous drop in the Pacific sardine of the Pacific sardine off the U.S. West Coast.  Just to note, contrary to recent claims and reports – the Council’s Scientific and Statistical Committee states the fishery is NOT overfished nor is it subject to overfishing. Read the rest here 10:39

Pacific Fishery Management Council Meeting in Rohnert Park, California April 10 – 16, 2015

PFMC SidebarThe Council and its advisory bodies will meet April 10-16, 2015 in Rohnert Park, California to address issues related to salmon, Pacific halibut, groundfish, coastal pelagic species, and essential fish habitat matters. The action starts Saturday!  April 10-16, 2015 Meeting Agenda ,  Council Meeting Internet Live Audio Stream Click here to register 18:03

Con Group Oceana wants West Coast Sardine Fishing shut down immediately!

West Coast fisheries managers will likely shut down sardine fishing this year in the face of evidence that the stock is declining. The commercial fishing fleet hopes that the Pacific Fishery Management Council will not be so concerned that they shut down other fisheries, such as mackerel and anchovies. However, the conservation group Oceana wants an immediate shut down. The group says this would leave food in the ocean for sea lions and other wildlife and speed the rebuilding process for sardines. Read the rest here 13:43

Ocean Salmon Season Will Open April 4 by Dan Bacher

The recreational salmon fishing season is slated to begin in the Fort Bragg, San Francisco and Monterey South regions of the California coast on Saturday, April 4, 2015. In spite of the record drought, the outlook for this year’s season is promising, due to an abundance of both Sacramento and Klamath River Chinook salmon. On March 12, the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC) adopted three public review options for the 2015 recreational and commercial salmon seasons off the West Coast. Read the rest here 10:01

West Coast waters shifting to lower-productivity regime, new NOAA report finds

PFMC SidebarLarge-scale climate patterns that affect the Pacific Ocean indicate that waters off the West Coast have shifted toward warmer, less productive conditions that may affect marine species from seabirds to salmon, according to the delivered to the Pacific Fishery Management Council. Read the rest here 11:41

Pacific Fishery Management Council move to protect tiny ocean fish

PFMC SidebarWest Coast fishery regulators on Tuesday banned fishing for huge swaths of species at the base of the ocean’s food chain, a major step toward ocean conservation that was hailed by environmentalists and fishermen alike. Most people probably never have heard of the hundreds of species protected by Tuesday’s vote at the council’s meeting in Vancouver, Washington. They fall into seven broad categories: Pacific saury, Silversides, round and thread herring, Pacific sand lance, Osmerid smelts, mesopelagic fishes and pelagic squids. Read the rest here 07:30

Pacific Fishery Management Council – Meeting in Vancouver, Washington March 6-12, 2015

PFMC SidebarThe Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) and its advisory bodies will meet March 6-12, 2015 in Vancouver, Washington to address issues related to salmon, Pacific halibut, highly migratory species, ecosystem based management, and habitat matters. Info page, Click here Download a PDF version of the Meeting Notice and Agenda Join the meeting in “listen-only” mode, Click here 10:14

Eco Zealot Oceana to feds: sea lions starving due to overfishing

Marine con group Oceana says thousands of sea lion pups that have died on the West Coast this year are succumbing to starvation from a lack of forage fish. Sardines – a preferred fish of sea lions – are more scarce than they have been in 15 years. Oceana is calling upon the Pacific Fishery Management Council to put a moratorium on new forage fisheries at its meeting next month. Read the rest here 14:00

Nominees sought for Pacific Fishery Management Council

PFMC SidebarThe Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is currently accepting nominations for a seat on the Pacific Fishery Management Council. The deadline to request nomination materials is Feb. 13. The three-year term begins in August. The successful candidate must work collectively with other council members, often making difficult decisions and fulfilling the standards set forth by the Magnuson-Stevens Act. Serving on the council is a substantial time commitment. Read the rest here 17:53

Pew Enviro Fueled Legislative Witch Hunt: An end to ‘curtains of death’?

California Assembly and Senate have asked federal fishery managers to end drift gillnets, which some call “curtains of death.” California remains the only state where drift gillnet fishing are legal. The legislature has authority over remaining gillnet permits. Recently lawmakers sent a letter to Pacific Fishery Management Council and National Marine Fisheries Service, demanding a transition to alternative fishing methods. Read the rest here 08:08

Higher Pacific sardine limits urged over environmental objections

The higher limits were proposed unanimously by the 14-member Pacific Fishery Management Council, one of eight advisory panels around the country that oversee commercial and recreational fishing for U.S. waters in their regions. Read the rest here 09:55

Pacific Fishery Management Council meeting November 12-19, 2014, Costa Mesa, California – Listen Live!

PFMC SidebarThe Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) and its advisory bodies will meet November 12-19, 2014 in Costa Mesa, California to address issues related to coastal pelagic species, groundfish, Pacific halibut, salmon, highly migratory species management, and habitat matters. Agenda and Meeting Notice here  One-Way Live Stream webinar Available here  Webinar ID, 430-417-591 More info here 15:11

Pacific Fishery Management Council Meeting September 10-17, 2014, in Spokane, Washington

The Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) and its advisory bodies will meet September 10-17, 2014 in Spokane, Washington to address issues related to management of groundfish, highly migratory species, coastal pelagic species, salmon, ecosystem management, and habitat matters. Download a PDF copy of the September 2014 meeting notice and agenda  Listen to the Meeting here  Enter webinar ID #: 143-975-167 and your email address (required) www.pcouncil.org

Fishermen Divided Over New Lingcod Limit Rules

mike hudsonA recent decision to increase the legal harvest limit of lingcod, a popular West Coast fish species, has sparked debate and some disagreement among fishermen and scientists. The lingcod population is higher than it’s been in several decades, according to the , the Portland-based panel of scientists and fishermen that approved the regulation change in late June. Read more here 04:03

Forage fish management key to protecting Pacific Ocean ecosystem health

Pacific sardine populations have shown an alarming decline in recent years, and some evidence suggests anchovy and herring populations may be dropping as well. The declines could push fishermen toward other currently unmanaged “forage fish,”  Read more here 10:35 The Forage Fish Farce

 

Washington and Oregon: Commercial salmon fishery open until Tuesday

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Fisheries, NMFS in consultation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, representatives from the commercial troll fishery, and the Pacific Fishery Management Council, has taken in-season actions with respect to the commercial troll salmon fishery. Read more here 09:41

Stronger restrictions adopted affecting California’s drift gill net fishery

West Coast fishery managers on Monday adopted stringent regulations against California’s swordfish and thresher shark drift gill net fishery, laying the framework to more aggressively limit its bycatch of endangered ocean species. Read more here 12:03

Pacific Fishery Management Council will meet June 18-25, 2014 in Garden Grove, California Listen Live!

Download a PDF copy of the June 18-25, 2014 Council Meeting Notice and Agenda – Join the meeting in “listen-only” mode by clicking this link,  Enter the Webinar ID – The June 20-25, 2014 Webinar ID is: 675-991-863 Please enter your email address (required) More info here 11:12

Pacific bluefin tuna deemed in danger – Centre for Biological Diversity

superecoman

The Centre for Biological Diversity filed a legal petition urging the National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA) to prohibit fishing for Pacific bluefin tuna, which is reported to have suffered a 96 per cent decline since large-scale fishing began. Read more here  12:09

California drift gill nets escape legislative ban; new technology promises to reduce bycatch

Local fishers have won a hard-fought battle against environmentalists working to ban the use of controversial gill nets, which are notorious for snagging unintended victims in their underwater synthetic webs. A bill in the state Legislature that would have likely shut down a local swordfish and thresher shark drift gill net fishery failed its first committee hearing despite widespread support from ocean and environmental advocates. Read more here  15:04

Bay Area commercial salmon fishing season begins

Expectations for the season hover between optimism and pessimism. The Pacific Fishery Management Council, a regulatory body, estimates there are 634,700 adult salmon in the Pacific Ocean that were born in the Sacramento River system, which is lower than the estimates from 2010 to 2012 but much higher than the figures from 2006 to 2009, when the fishery collapsed. Read more here  08:38

Pacific Fishery Management Council has good news for both Oregon sport anglers and commercial troll salmon fishermen

Recreational and commercial troll Chinook salmon fishing this year looks to vary from good to great based on forecasted adult returns destined for key river basins of the Columbia River, the Central Valley in California, and the Klamath River. Read more here dailyastorian 21:34

The Columbian: In Our View: Small Forage Fish a Big Deal

The-Columbian-01The Pacific Fishery Management Council is expected to have a big conversation this week about some small things. Well, small in size but large in importance. As part of a weeklong series of meetings, council members are scheduled Thursday morning to tackle the issue of “forage fish”,,Read more here  13:48

Fish and Future by Carmine Gorga  Read more here

Starts Tomorrow! The Pacific Fishery Management Council Meeting in Sacramento – Listen Live!

The Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) and its advisory bodies will meet March 7-13, 2014 in Sacramento, California to address issues related to salmon, Pacific halibut, groundfish, coastal pelagic species, highly migratory species, and habitat matters. Key agenda items for the March meeting include Council considerations can be read here. Council Meeting Internet Live Audio Stream information here  10:21

Big runs of Columbia River chinook, coho highlight 2014 salmon forecasts

OLYMPIA – Salmon fishing in the ocean and the Columbia River this summer could be great thanks to an abundant run of hatchery coho and a potentially historic return of chinook, according to state fishery managers. Read more here  wa.gov 22:38

Magnuson-Stevens reauthorization: Fisheries debate likely to heat up soon

seattle workshop CSF #2NEW BEDFORD — The fledgling Center for Sustainable Fisheries takes its message to Seattle, Wash. in February to stoke discussion of changes in the way commercial fisheries are regulated. The delegation will be led by Dr. Brian Rothschild, dean emeritus of the UMass School for Marine Science and Technology. He will be joined by CSF chief operating officer Kate Kramer, who told The Standard-Times on Wednesday, “People on the West Coast have different ideas about the Magnuson-Stevens reauthorization.” Read [email protected]  10:01

Indepth – A controversial decision: Fishery Managers Scale Back 2014 Pacific Sardine Harvest

A controversial decision by the Pacific Fishery Management Council (PFMC) would set catch limits during the initial phase of the 2014 Pacific sardine season well below traditional recommendations. [email protected]  17:10

Pacific Fishery Management Council slash’s sardine harvest along West Coast

The Pacific Fishery Management Council voted 7-6 Sunday in Costa Mesa, Calif., to set the commercial harvest level for California, Oregon and Washington at 5,446 metric tons for the first six months of 2014, down from 18,073 metric tons for the same period in 2013. [email protected] 11:51

Pacific Fishery Management Council – deep cuts for Sardines

The decline in West Coast sardine populations saw regulators on Sunday approve sharp cuts on commercial fishing for the species in 2014. The Pacific Fishery Management Council set a catch limit of 29,770 metric tons for 2014 – less than half the limit last year. Stay tuned. 21:33