Tag Archives: Pebble mine

Pebble mine opponents at Dillingham meeting hammer EPA for changed course

In close to four hours of public testimony, dozens of people told EPA staffers that large-scale mining threatens a fishery and way of life in Bristol Bay. The unanimous opinion given during Wednesday’s meeting in Dillingham, held in the middle of the work day, was that the EPA should finalize preemptive Section 404(c) Clean Water Act restrictions, not withdraw them and wait for an environmental impact statement. click here to read the story 09:30

Pebble rising?

Once thought to be on the verge of death, Alaska’s proposed Pebble prospect copper and gold mine seems to be taking on a new life. First came the July announcement by the Environmental Protection Agency of President Donald Trump that it planned to lift a proposed ban on the mine ordered by the EPA of President Barrack Obama.,,, The Pebble Limited Partnership sued the Obama administration and the EPA of Trump – taking a page from the playbook of enviromental organizations fond of filing lawsuits to leverage legal settlements – in this case negotiated an agreement allowing Pebble to apply for the necessary permits. click here to read the story 09:37

Gold vs. Salmon: How Pebble Mine Threatens Alaskan Salmon

The environment and natural resources have been a topic of great controversy in the United States and throughout the world, especially in recent years. We have always had a battle between industrialism and conservation. From one end, profits must grow, jobs must be made, and mouths must be fed. Yet from the other end, we must protect our planet, the environment, and the many species of wild animals that roam the globe.,,, In Alaska there is a hot debate going on between which is more important, salmon or gold. In 2001 a Canadian mining company called Northern Dynasty Minerals began exploring and testing an area of Alaska that is located East of Bristol Bay, North of Lake Iliamna and South West of the Lake Clark Natural Reserve. They were going off of data provided by Cominco Alaska Exploration, who in 1987 discovered a site of possible mineral wealth in the region.,,, If this article has moved you, then please do not sit idly by. Thank you Nikolai!  click here to read this excellent article 14:23

Fishermen’s voices will not fall silent

As we look to the summer ahead, the Bristol Bay commercial fishing fleet again faces a season of uncertainty. To be sure, our fishermen face unknowns every year: be it the price per pound, strength of the run, or the possibility of dangerous weather. For over a decade though, our fleet has been living with an uncertainty more dangerous than them all. After 10 years of actively fighting the prospect of a mine that could end our centuries-old commercial fishery, we go into this fishing season with the proposed Pebble Mine as close as it has ever been to permitting. The issue weighs heavy over the fleet, and there is no denying we are more than a little tired of the fight. But that is what this foreign mining company is waiting for, us to get tired and quit fighting. That’s why I am excited about a new effort; Sustaining Bristol Bay Fisheries (SBBF), founded to represent commercial fishermen in the fight to protect our livelihoods. Click here to read the rest 09:16

Not Good. Alaska approves key permit for Pebble copper-gold mine, with conditions

Shares in Canadian miner Northern Dynasty Minerals (TSX:NDM) were soaring Wednesday morning following Alaska’s Department of Natural Resources (DNR) approval of a long-awaited land-use permit that clears the way for the company’s vast, but stalled Pebble copper-gold-silver project. The permit, issued late Tuesday, allows Northern Dynasty’s subsidiary — Pebble Limited Partnership — to conduct reclamation and monitoring activities at hundreds of boreholes for the next 12 months. The company, which applied for such permit in October last year, was hoping to get it until 2018. The land use permit comes after months of reviewing the application and over 1,000 public comments, the authority said. grrrrrr. click here to read the story 10:24

It’s good business to keep Bristol Bay protections

Regulations are in the crosshairs in Washington, D.C. these days. Those elected officials and appointed agency leaders have been clear in their goal to get rid of regulations they say are blocking jobs and economic activity. I humbly suggest that in this flurry to slash red tape, one Environmental Protection Agency protection should stay in place: the one protecting the Bristol Bay fishery in Alaska from the controversial Pebble Mine. I guarantee you the EPA’s plan to restrict mine waste disposal in Bristol Bay waters protects jobs and economic activity: those of my family and the 14,000 others who rely on our nation’s most valuable salmon fishery. In fact, we Alaskans call the sockeye salmon that return to Bristol Bay in their annual spawning runs “red gold.” Bristol Bay is the largest wild salmon fishery remaining anywhere in the world. For thousands of years, those fish have represented not just survival, but wealth. continue reading the op-ed here by Kim Williams 09:08

Pebble mine gets no better with time – Danielle Stickman

In early 2006, when George W. Bush occupied in the White House and the Republican Party was firmly in control of Congress, then-CEO of Canadian-based Northern Dynasty Minerals Bruce Jenkins spoke to several communities in Bristol Bay about the company’s plans to construct one of the world’s largest open-pit mines in the middle of the region we have always called home. In his mind, the mine was a done deal. In fact, there was little in the way of consultation or collaboration with the community – Jenkins stated emphatically that Pebble mine would be built. It was just a question of when, not if it would be built. Fast forward 11 years. The GOP once again controls the White House and Congress, promising to open lands to new development and roll back government regulations. Perhaps not surprisingly, a project many believed was dead has been given new life. Some investment blogs and websites are newly bullish on the proposed Pebble project. Northern Dynasty’s current CEO, Ronald Thiessen, is traveling the world to tout Pebble’s prospects, stating the Pebble Limited Partnership, a subsidiary owned and created by Northern Dynasty to develop the mine, will begin permitting this year. Forgive my skepticism about these claims. continue reading the op-ed here 08:59

Kerrisdale Capital Slams Northern Dynasty Minerals Ltd – Pebble Mine shares are ‘worthless’

A New York investment firm tore apart claims by the owners of the Pebble mine project that developing the prospect is economically viable in a no-holds-barred report released Feb. 14. Kerrisdale Capital called Vancouver-based Northern Dynasty Minerals Ltd., “worthless” in its 21-page report, contending sources directly involved in evaluating Pebble before Anglo American walked away from the project in 2013, despite spending roughly $500 million on it, said Pebble would cost close to $13 billion to construct, not the $4.7 billion capital cost Northern Dynasty arrived at in its preliminary project assessment. “In the past decade, Northern Dynasty has hired at least two major engineering firms to prepare preliminary feasibility studies of Pebble laying out its economics in detail, yet it has failed to publish their findings — because they were damning,” Kerrisdale alleges. Continue reading the article here 11:27

Alaskans should have the final say on Pebble Mine – Sharon and Everett Thompson of Naknek, Alaska,

Pebble Mine’s Canadian, would-be developers are ecstatically peddling a story that their mine’s approval is certain. A new Trump Administration, “desires to see Pebble permitted,” Northern Dynasty’s chief executive said Monday. Because of this, investors are piling on, sending the Northern Dynasty stock soaring in recent weeks. All of these outsiders have forgotten one thing: the Pebble Mine is proposed in Bristol Bay, Alaska, not the South Lawn of the White House. Bristol Bay supports the world’s largest run of sockeye salmon that sustains local communities, businesses and the regional economy. Alaskans hate the proposal despite “alternative facts” being pushed by Northern Dynasty in recent days claiming local support. Let the record show that 80 percent of Bristol Bay residents have said clearly that they don’t want the mine. Statewide, 65 percent of residents have said “no mine.” Read the op-ed here  The notion that the Trump Administration will approve Pebble is shear speculation on the part of Northern Dynasty. Read the story here 09:22

Voices of Alaska: Future of wild salmon depends on decisions made today, by Commercial Fisherman Steve Harrison

emmonak salmonOur state is home to the nation’s last stronghold of wild salmon and, for the most part, we have managed our fisheries well. For generations Alaskans have sustainably harvested millions of wild salmon while this amazing fish continues to return to their native streams, spawn and rejuvenate the population every year. Tasked with developing policies that protect our salmon resource, the Alaska Board of Fish uses the basic principles of sustainable yield and conservative management to drive decision-making and, by-and-large, it has worked. But managing the harvest of salmon is only part of the equation. Ensuring our salmon runs remain strong also means protecting the habitat they depend on, from the wetlands at the headwaters of the streams they spawn all the way to the ocean where they spend the majority of their lives. In recent years, pressure to allow mining and damming interests to set up shop in and around our prolific salmon streams has increased greatly, with proposed projects like the Pebble Mine, Susitna dam, and the Chuitna Coal strip mine leading the charge. Read the rest here 17:15

Seafood development association shifts focus away from Pebble Mine

The Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association took another step away from prior efforts to fight Pebble Mine with the election of a new board president. The fishing association, or BBRSDA, is funded by a 1 percent tax on Bristol Bay drift fishermen. Historically it has opposed , including spending at least a fifth of its budget on sustainability and anti-mining efforts over the past several years and a policy statement adopted in 2008 that opposed large-scale mining. But that focus has been shifting away from that work. Read the rest here 21:30

Battle Over Alaska’s Bristol Bay Pits Salmon Against Gold

Commercial fisherman, native Alaskans and environmentalist in Bristol Bay have banded together to fight the building of the mine. Bristol Bay provides 40% of America’s wild caught seafood and $2 billion dollars in commercial fishing. It’s also the single greatest sockeye salmon fishery in the world. Right now, much of the land is protected by either the federal or state governments, but not the one piece where the potential mine would sit. Read the rest here 09:44

Salmon Vs. Gold Splits Alaska GOP

There’s gold in them thar…. swamps. A lot of gold, in fact—up to $120 billion of it, lying within the Bristol Bay watershed in Alaska. Which is why a Canadian company, Northern Dynasty Minerals Ltd., wants to dig one of the world’s largest open-pit mines to get it. Naturally, there’s a fight. Mines are messy, and this one—the —could threaten delicate salmon spawning grounds. But this fight is different—because there are Republicans on both sides. Read the rest here 09:26

Supreme Court says it’s too early to rule on APOC bias complaint

Long-running tensions between a wealthy opponent of the proposed Pebble mine and the Alaska Public Offices Commission continue, with a decision Friday by the Alaska Supreme Court to let an administrative challenge run its course. That already has happened, but the matter is far from settled. Read the rest here 11:56

Guest: Wait for the facts on Pebble Mine

THE proposed Alaskan Pebble Mine, a copper-and-gold mine, has received almost as much attention in Seattle as it has in our neck of the woods in Alaska. Much of the focus has been on how the potential mine could affect large commercial fishing companies, especially in Washington state. Unfortunately, while everyone seems to be focusing on salmon and what’s best for Bristol Bay, our people and our interests seem to have been put on the back burner. In fact, we believe others’ interests are being put ahead of ours, and our voice is not being heard. We thought Seattle residents might want to know how we feel. Read the rest here 11:10

Mine waste storage and salmon runs, what could go wrong?

In a Northern Dynasty submission to the EPA, Knight Piesold, the firm which engineered the , weighed in. “Modern dam design technologies are based on proven scientific/engineering principles, and there is no basis for asserting that they will not stand the test of time.” Well, I guess the test of time was a pop quiz and Knight Piesold flunked it. They also engineered the failed dam at Northern Dynasty . Read the rest here 11:00

EPA rules would likely block Pebble Mine in Alaska

WASHINGTON — The Environmental Protection Agency on Friday announced severe restrictions on the proposed Pebble Mine in Alaska, a move that is likely to block a project the EPA said could devastate the best run of wild salmon left on the planet. Read more here 10:10

Read more here: http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2014/07/18/3757097/epa-rules-would-likely-block-pebble.html#storylink=cpy

Not everyone likes the EPA Pebble decision: EPA goes too far on Pebble mine

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy on Friday did what supporters of the proposed Pebble mine feared she would do: initiate a review process that could preemptively prevent the mine project from proceeding. Read more here  09:25

EPA Moves to Protect Bristol Bay from Pebble Mine

The Environmental Protection Agency today announced that they are using section 404 C of the Clean Water Act to halt development of the Pebble Mine in Southwest Alaska. Section 404 C authorizes the EPA to prohibit or limit projects that would have an unacceptable adverse impact on the environment. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy made the announcement during a teleconference this morning. Read more here  15:43

Pebble Mine Opponents Urge EPA To Kill Project

About 30 opponents of the proposed Pebble Mine met in Washington today with White House and high-ranking EPA staff. They came armed with a new EPA study that found a mine of Pebble’s size would pose a significant risk to Bristol Bay and its valuable salmon fisheries. Now they’re asking the Environment agency to take the next step and kill the project. They didn’t get a definite answer. Listen and Read more here 10:34

A commercial fishermen’s group Plans Ads Thanking Begich for Pebble Stance

A commercial fishermen’s group is running TV ads thanking Sen. Mark Begich for his opposition to the proposed Pebble Mine. Bob Waldrop is executive director of the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association. He says ads will begin running Wednesday. Read [email protected]  12:10

EPA Releases Final Assessment of Bristol Bay Watershed

The EPA’s Region 10 office published the final assessment online Wednesday, but the agency declined to issue any regulatory decisions at this time. – The report concludes, in no uncertain terms, that “large-scale mining poses risks to salmon and the tribal communities that have depended on them for thousands of years.”  Read the document here.   Read [email protected]  16:51

Anti-Pebble Initiative Clears Signature Hurdle

A group opposed to the proposed Pebble Mine has secured enough signatures to get their initiative on the ballot. On Tuesday, the Division of Elections counted 30,210 verified signatures for the Bristol Bay Forever initiative. It needs 30,169 to be put to a vote. [email protected]  21:16

Crushing Pebble: The Pebble copper and gold prospect is drawing fresh heat

Its biggest investor is gone and its staff and contractors have been cut to the bone, but the Pebble copper and gold prospect is drawing fresh heat from a newly formed organization made up of old adversaries of the mine project. The new group is Bristol Bay United, formed by leaders of the Bristol Bay Native Corp., the sportfishing advocacy group Trout Unlimited, and a commercial fishing group called the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association. [email protected]14:10

The “Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment” Discussed During Congressional Oversight Hearing – audio

radio-microphoneMany of the recent policy and enforcement efforts of the Environmental Protection Agency came under fire Thursday during an oversight hearing in the U.S. House of Representatives. Much of the hearing was focused on the EPA’s “Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment”. KDLG’s Mike Mason listened in and filed this report, which is part 1 of a 2 part series. [email protected] 10:15

Thanks, But No Thanks OPINION: EPA intervention not in Alaska’s best interest – Ron Bowers, Dillingham, Alaska

I appreciate the EPA Administrator’s efforts to hear the concerns of local residents on a proposed . However I am totally opposed to inviting a heavy handed and out of control federal agency full of unelected bureaucrats to intervene in this issue that needs to be decided by Alaskans. [email protected]  09:00

Seattle Times Editorial: Vigilance required at Alaska’s Bristol Bay

A major partner in the proposed Pebble mine project in Alaska has withdrawn, but do not assume the giant mine is dead or Bristol Bay is safe. OPPONENTS of a massive gold, copper and molybdenum mining operation proposed for the headwaters of Alaska’s salmon-rich Bristol Bay are not letting their guard down. [email protected] 09:39

This is Fish Radio. I’m Laine Welch – The Pebble Mine is still on track, say developers.

FISH-With-Mic-Logo-GRAPHIC-303-x-400-e1360148757522News on Monday that Anglo-American has withdrawn from the Pebble Mine partnership was greeted with joy by mine opponents. Pebble would be the largest gold and copper mine in North America, and its location looms over the world’s biggest sockeye salmon fishery at Bristol Bay – [email protected]  16:07

Anglo-American pulls out of Pebble Mine project

One of the two companies seeking to build Alaska’s Pebble mine is dropping out of the project as scrutiny grows over its impact on wild salmon. British mining giant Anglo American said Monday it is withdrawing from the Pebble Partnership, a 50-50 venture with Canada’s Northern Dynasty Minerals. Anglo American will take a $300 million charge for dropping out.Anglo American CEO Mark Cutifani said the company wants to focus instead on lower risk projects. [email protected]  14:47

New EPA chief steps into Alaska mine controversy

“No amount of money or jobs can replace our way of life,” Nondalton Tribal Council President William Evanoff told the EPA leader. “The threats are real.” In the Bristol Bay fishing town of Dillingham, everyone who spoke to McCarthy was against the Pebble mine. The town of about 2,300 lives and breathes salmon, with vivid murals on the weathered buildings celebrating salmon and urging their preservation. [email protected] 11:49