Tag Archives: research

NL research shows LED lights draw crab to the pot

While they stopped short of trying a tiny disco ball, a local team of researchers has proven the addition of certain light emitting diode (LED) lights will draw snow crab to offshore traps.
“Fishing enterprises could theoretically reduce bait costs through LED light substitution, or enhance existing catch rates of baited traps by simply adding an LED light,” notes their research report, now available through the journal Aquaculture and Fisheries. A team from Memorial University of Newfoundland’s Fisheries and Marine Institute, and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans completed related work in May and June 2016, with the help of the DFO base in St. John’s and, later, the fishing vessel Atlantic Champion. Click here to read the story 09:33

NOAA and Sea Grant fund $800,000 in research to understand effects of ocean changes on iconic Northeast marine life

620300c1768EDNmainDevelopOAresistantOysters_BeckyZeiberNHSeaGrantNOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program (OAP) and the Northeast Sea Grant Programs joined together to prioritize and fund new research on how ocean acidification is affecting marine life including lobsters, clams, oysters, mussels and sand lance that are so important to the Northeast region. Funding includes $800,000 in federal funds from the two programs with an additional $400,000 non-federal match. NOAA and Sea Grant drew on the work of the Northeast Coastal Acidification Network to set these priorities. The Network is made up of concerned fishermen, scientists, resource managers, and representatives from federal and state agencies who work together to identify critical vulnerabilities in the northeast, including regionally important and economically significant marine resources that are vital to the many livelihoods and the culture of New England. Read the rest here 00:23

What happened to all the Chinook Salmon? New research points to potential predators

salmsharkclsIn the 1960s, king salmon were abundant in Alaska, and it stayed that way through the 90s. After the new millennium, though, Chinook numbers fell — and they’ve remained low since. “People have scratched their heads and said, ‘Where are all the kings? What happened to all the kings?’” said Andy Seitz, an associate professor at the University of Alaska Fairbanks School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences. At a lecture in Unalaska this week, Seitz explained how his research team has studied adult Chinook in the Bering Sea for the last three years. The project relied on pop-up satellite tags, which attach to salmon and measure the water temperature, depth, and ambient light of their environment. Seitz and his team think warm-blooded salmon sharks ate the kings and their tags, and the odd data was recorded when fish were trapped in the sharks’ guts. He also said they found five instances where marine mammals and other unidentified predators could have killed Chinook. Read the story here 18:41

How oil damages fish hearts: Five years of research since the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Scientists with the Ecotoxicology Program at NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle have been working to understand those effects. “Along with our research partners,” said Nat Scholz, the scientist who leads the program, “we’re investigating the more subtle, lingering, and potentially widespread impacts of oil on the health and survival of fish.” Read the rest here 14:19

Woods Hole gets $5.2M to research marine microbes from Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation

FALMOUTH, Mass. (AP) — The Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution says it’s been awarded $5.2 million this year to support research on a critical component of ocean health — marine microbes. Read More