Tag Archives: seals

A Must Read! FishNet USA / Dogfish and seals and dolphin, oh my!

The bottom line is that while commercial fishermen from North Carolina to Maine are at work catching on the order of half a million mt of fish and shellfish a year, it appears as if it takes an annual 20,000,000 tons or more to keep all those marine mammals and low-value spiny dogfish and various other predatory fish going. How much of that 20 million tons is commercially/recreationally valuable species or the forage species that sustain them? No one seems awfully interested in finding that out, but they sure should be. Read the rest here 10:55

Southern Gulf of St. Lawrence – Direct link between the increase in the herd of seals and increased the mortality of cod

A study conducted by researchers from fisheries and Oceans Canada just give reason to those who believe that the grey seal is a real threat to the balance of the cod stocks. For Magdalen Islanders hunters as for Gaspé fishers, this conclusion says and just put an end to a debate that lasts for years. This article was translated from French Canadian Read the rest here 16:49

Sea lions take a big bite out of returning salmon runs

“When the region is directing more than half a billion dollars a year to fish and wildlife recovery and nearly half of the spring run is being consumed by seals and sea lions, then we definitely have a problem,” a member of the Northwest Power and Planning Council said. Read the rest here 14:40

Fishermen Convicted of Improperly Harvesting Seals

Duncan Sharpe of Gander, Kevin Blackler of St. John’s, and Richard Worthman of Heart’s Delight were convicted for improperly harvesting seals in accordance with humane harvesting requirements under the Canadian federal Fisheries Act.  Read more here 07:46

Seals gobble half a million fish – commercial fisheries report almost 500K in losses

Professional fishermen in Finland are up in arms about damages to their catch and equipment from grey seals. Recent figures from the Finnish Game and Fisheries Research Institute estimate that the market value of fish lost to seals is 466,000 euros. (578,820.87 US Dollars)  Read the rest here 09:00

Commercial harvester says seals, not climate change, is the reason for decline of cod in New England

GreySealwebAn Associated Press story recently drew a comparison between the decline of cod in the United States with what happened to the northern cod stocks in the late 1980s and 1990s that impacted Canada’s east coast communities and changed the face of the fishery in this province. Read the rest here 08:20

Return of the seals to Plettenberg Bay

Fishermen have been pointing fingers at seals for decades,,,Despite evidence to the contrary, the fishing industry continues to lay the blame for collapsing fish stocks on seals rather than on its own unsustainable practices. (what say ye?) Read more here 08:06

Cork Fisherman Calls For Seal Cull – YoughalOnline.com

Published on May 25, 2014 – Fisherman Barry Clohessy from Youghal, Co Cork, Ireland is outraged with the Department of Marine for ignoring the seal damage to his livelihood. Seals are a protected species in this country but the damage they are doing to nets and the living of the local fishermen is shocking. Watch video here  16:03

Last-minute arrival to Maine alewives festival: the fish

Now that the alewife run has begun, King said it will accelerate quickly. At Webber Pond on Seven Mile Stream in Vassalboro, he said he counted four fish Tuesday, 1,000 on Wednesday and more than 3,000 by midafternoon Friday. “For the environment, it’s a huge win,” said Jeffrey Pierce, president of the Alewife Harvesters of Maine. However, Pierce said the prevalence of predators raises new questions about wildlife management. Read more here  09:13

We saved the Cape and Islands’ seals from extinction. Now what?

They’re cute. They’re cuddly (or at least they look it). And they were here long before us. But in recent years calls for culling the growing population of seals on the Cape and Islands have become harder to ignore. Read more here  bostonglobe  08:01

Submitted by George Washington – Seals, Sea Lions, Polar Bears, Bald Eagles, Sea Stars, Turtles, King and Sockeye Salmon, Herring, Anchovies, Sardines All Dying

We’ve previous documented that seals, sea lions, polar bears, sea stars, turtles, sockeye salmon, herring, anchovies and sardines on the West Coast of North America are all suffering mysterious diseases … which are killing many. We’ve asked whether this is related  to  massive releases of radiation from Fukushima. Update Sadly, we can now add other wildlife to the list.  George Washington @ zero hedge. I dunno. Interesting read. Catch Radical Marijuana’s interesting comment. Read [email protected]  23:13

The Long Haul, Part 4 – Protected Seals Raise Many Questions

In years past, seal hunters received a bounty of five dollars a nose to keep the population in check. Now, seals are federally protected, and their numbers have been steadily rebounding, with many thousands now living in local waters year-round. They’ve become a major tourist attraction, but local fishermen see the seals as just another threat to their livelihoods. [email protected]

Prey, Predator Doesn’t Equal Cause, Effect

On the surface it seems like a simple and straightforward equation: more seals equals more great white sharks. The connection, however, is likely far more complicated. [email protected]

From the Moderator – The contentious issue of seals, marine mammal population’s and public comment ignorance.

Posting link’s to story’s for fisherynation.com viewer’s today, and over the past few day’s, some issues stand out and I thought I’d address them. These are my opinion’s, and mine only. If you agree, or disagree, you have an opportunity to present your opinion. Submit them through the contact, located on the blue menu bar, and they will be featured. Keep it civil, and on point, please, with no insults or vulgar language. During the week, I posted three articles about “Study shows depleted fish stocks can come back from the brink”, with the claim cod will never recover in Canada because,, continued

Nearly 15,000 seals fill Cape Cod’s beaches as the sea mammal’s population explodes

Nearly 15,000 seals have been drawn to the  beaches of Cape Cod, sunning themselves on the New England shores. Aerial pictures of the coast show the sea  mammals covering the area in brown. continued

 

More Seal Issues from the other side – Grey seals robbing Danish fishermen of their livelihood

FishUpdate.com – From southern Zealand it is reported that 60-70 per cent of the cod is  now either being torn out of the nets by seals or  they are being mutilated,  which means they cannot be landed or sold. In other places up to 30 per cent of the cod is being bitten or mutilated. continued

Too many seals?

In 1991, researchers counted six seal pups on Muskeget Island just northwest of Nantucket. In 2007 they counted 2,096. That, in a nutshell, describes the trigger for this past Saturday’s Outer Cape Seal Symposium. More than 200 scientists, fishermen, and other people involved in coastal activities gathered at the Chatham High School auditorium to learn, share, and work on a process for dealing with what can, at times, seems like a fish-eating flippered invasion. continue reading

Seal Problems Everywhere! Fishermen want cull of New Zealand fur seals around the Coorong Lakes area

“If these populations continue to increase at the levels they have been, the impact on the broader ecosystem will be such that something will need to be done,” Goolwa Pipi Harvest Association chair Roger Edwards said.

“We harvest other native species like kangaroos.

“If the species is not under threat and it is having an impact and there is a viable market, then why should it not be harvested?

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/national/fishermen-want-cull-of-new-zealand-fur-seals-around-the-coorong-lakes-area/story-fndo471r-1226497314088

Cape Cod’s fishermen fret over seals, dogfish and the future

Two areas, 35-miles south and 150-miles east of Chatham have been closed for cod  and other groundfish but the National Marine Fisheries Service is contemplating  re-opening to help fishermen because all fishermen are facing drastic cuts of 70  percent in cod and 73 percent in haddock on Georges Bank. But not all fishermen  are enthused.

Then there’s this insight by someone who can’t be very smart.

Wholesaler Andy Baler of the Nantucket Fish Company noted that huge mid-water  trawlers are catching tons of herring off shore while the National Marine  Fisheries Service looks idly on. “Cod and haddock feed on local herring but they’re starving. That’s why you  see fish so skinny,” he said. “The mid-water trawlers are going to suck every  bit of bait out there. You have one management system for some fish and another  management system that goes and kills all the fish they eat.” Bullard conceded the two plans are un-connected. NOAA takes a fish by fish  approach. “This port is crushed. We’re living on a few dogfish,” Baler declared. “We  need some help. Keep the herring here so we can fish the channel.”

Read more: Cape Cod’s fishermen fret over seals, dogfish and the future – – Harwich Oracle http://www.wickedlocal.com/brewster/newsnow/x1826353094/Cape-Cods-fishermen-fret-over-seals-dogfish-and-the-future#ixzz29O2eBrZ9

The relationship is this. The larvae of the bottom fish need to go to the surface of the ocean in order to obtain food – plankton – and light. While they go up, they become a feast for the pelagics. When those larvae that survive become codlThe relationship is this. The larvae of the bottom fish need to go to the surface of the ocean in order to obtain food – plankton – and light. While they go up, they become a feast for the pelagics. When those larvae that survive become codlings, they want to go back to their friends and relatives. While they descend to their native habitat, they become a second feast for the pelagics.

http://carmine3.newsvine.com/_news/2010/11/04/5408211-fish-and-future

http://jjthefisherman.newsvine.com/_news/2011/09/07/7650662-fish-in-the-northwest-atlantic-are-going-hungry-new-science-from-maines-department-of-marine-resources-helps-to-explain-why