Tag Archives: shrimpers

Shrimpers Still Impacted by Shortage of Workers

Shrimpers in the Rio Grande Valley say they are still experiencing a shortage of workers. Captain Jesus Moreno tells CHANNEL 5 NEWS it’s a tough job. He explains, new shrimpers quit within days and ask to go home. This year, the number of visas issued under the H2B program expanded. Still, only about 15 to 20 percent of the shrimpers received a visa worker. KRGV’s Christian von Preysing spoke with Andrea Hance with the Texas Shrimp Association. She says Texas shrimpers need a total of 750 workers. >click to watch<15:02

Lawmakers urge more FDA inspections of imported seafood, win approval

An effort to increase the amount of imported seafood the U.S. inspects for health issues has crossed a hurdle in the Senate. Louisiana’s two Republican senators, John Kennedy and Bill Cassidy, won approval of a measure that would add $3.1 million the FDA’s budget for such testing. Shrimpers in Terrebonne and Lafourche, joined by their peers in other states, have pushed for the measure,, The group represents shrimp fishermen and processors in Louisiana, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Texas. Video >click to read<17:48

Take shrimper’s concerns seriously

Fourteen years ago Louisiana shrimpers joined those from other Gulf states and pooled their money — along with processors and dock owners — to pay millions of dollars in legal fees to bring a case for tariffs to the U.S. Department of Commerce and the International Trade Commission. The punitive tariffs that were approved, after this costly battle, were the result of findings that China and other nations were dumping shrimp into the U.S. at a below-market price or subsidizing the industry in some nations. The tariffs did some good but not enough. There is ample proof that shrimp were routed through other countries not contending with tariffs to defeat the process. The result has been more shrimp often raised in unsanitary farms and containing chemicals banned in the European Union but allowed in certain thresholds at U.S. docks.  >click to read<17:01

Newly discovered illegal reef off the coast of Lee County impacting shrimpers

An alert for one of Southwest Florida’s biggest industries after an illegal, manmade reef was discovered off the coast of Lee County. A shrimp net worth almost $2,000 was found tangled up in the illegal manmade reef. Fishermen discovered it about 9 miles off the shore of Fort Myers Beach – a place where many drop their nets to catch shrimp. Captain Mark Grunwale with Erickson and Jensen Shrimp Company spends weeks at a time fishing for shrimp with some pretty expensive equipment. “We know where a lot of them are at, but we didn’t know where this one was at,” Capt. Grunwale said. On Friday, divers from the Lee County Sheriff’s Office recovered a shrimp net caught in the illegal reef that not only impacted shrimpers but marine life as well. “There will be no knowing how it got there. This particular site is right in the middle of shrimp trolling lanes when they are coming out of Fort Myers Beach.” The net is believed to belong to a shrimp company out of Texas. Video, read the story here 19:38

Trump victory brings hope for shrimpers

570418_1Roger Schmall’s shrimp boat engine lay in pieces on his deck. After the last one, which cost $35,000 came apart after only one trip out to sea, he’s decided to rebuild one himself to make sure it’s done right. Engines usually last 8 to 10 years, but he got a bad one, he said. He’s just got one boat these days, the Kayden Nicole, so his livelihood is tied to a working engine. Schmall’s spent the last 34 years working in the industry, and one of the few left of his ilk. Schmall is one of many local shrimpers who were hit hard when the U.S. began opening up to international trade through deals like the North American Trade Act (NAFTA), passed in 1994. During his campaign and in his 100 day plan which he outlined in his speech at Gettysburg in October, President Elect Donald Trump pledged to withdraw, or at least substantially change, some of the U.S.’s deals with other countries. Read the story here 10:03

Brownsville Tx. – Shrimpers struggling to compete with imported shrimp

texas shrimpersA slow start to the shrimping season has local shrimpers struggling to compete with imported farm-raised shrimp. Shrimpers are eager to return to local waters after being off for two months. “We have two boats and we’re probably one of the few people that actually jumped into this business without having a family history being in the business,” Texas Shrimp Association Executive Director Andrea Hance said. She’s been in the shrimping business since 2007. She said this season is slow, especially when it comes to their prized catch. “We have a niche market in terms of the large jumbo shrimp. We’re just not catching enough of them right now,” Hance said. She said they’re seeing a lot more small shrimp out in the Gulf which is unusual. A five-pound bag of locally-caught shrimp will cost someone about $30. Imported farm-raised shrimp will sell a similar bag for around $24. Video, Read the rest here 07:23

Commercial fishermen need our support

gulf shrimpIn Dulac and Golden Meadow, Chauvin and Pointesaux-Chenes, shrimpers are readying their vessels for a new season, hoping that nature and the markets will smile on their efforts, and provide not only a bountiful crop but prices that will support their livelihoods. Like the shrimpers, crabbers and oystermen have faced significant challenges, and all are working hard as always to keep afloat. The visible signs of their industry, located as they are in communities where many of us don’t spend time unless recreating, go unseen by most of us. But they are there, day in and day out. They know that their numbers have dwindled, that their infrastructure – the packing houses to which many sell their harvests – is dwindling as well. Read the op-ed here 08:44

Fish, shellfish recovered from Katrina faster than fishermen

As Hurricane Katrina lashed everything above ground, it also caused problems for seafood in the waters of the Gulf of Mexico. With the exception of oysters, seafood does OK during hurricanes,” Caffey said. “The sediment can smother an oyster bed and cause short-term losses. Long term, fishermen don’t do well.” That’s because fishermen rely on boats, processing plants and docks that get walloped by the hurricanes, and that leaves livelihoods in danger. Read the rest here 17:06

Shrimpers, Crabbers Learn New Regulations at Louisiana Fisheries Meeting

Shrimpers and crabbers learned about the newest regulations, techniques and equipment at a Louisiana Fisheries Forward meeting on March 24, organized by the LSU AgCenter and Louisiana Sea Grant. Thu Bui, LSU AgCenter and Louisiana Sea Grant fisheries agent, said the meetings are intended to help fishers learn about new developments before their peak seasons get underway soon. “It makes them more professional and gives them the information so they can become more profitable,” Read the rest here 09:55

Researchers, shrimpers look for black gill shrimp in Georgia

Black Gill in shrimpThis wasn’t your typical cruise. For starters, the day-long journey around Chatham County waterways on the 92-foot R/V Savannah on Thursday was focused on a tiny parasite on shrimp that turns their gills an unsightly and unmarketable black. And instead of scientists researching the problem by themselves and reporting their results in a scientific journal years from now, they invited along shrimpers,,, Video,   Read the rest here

Georgia: Shrimpers caught fishing illegally

Six Georgia fishermen are in hot water for allegedly catching hundreds of pounds of shrimp in state waters before legally allowed to do so. Rangers caught two boats and crews jumping the gun – the first on May 29 and the second on Saturday. Read more here 07:30

Macaluso: Years have changed Louisiana shrimp plan

Back then, as many as 100 shrimpers expressed their opinions on what action the seven-member commission should take for those all-important opening dates. Today, the process is so routine, so accepted, that it drew only two comments, and those came from Vermilion Bay interests, and one was about how much trouble abandoned crab traps cause Vermilion shrimpers. Read more here  18:43

Same Oil Routine – Calhoun County fishermen believe they are left in the dark about oil – “Responses to these incidents are not public events.”

“The fishermen around here think they’re hiding stuff,” said Johnny Williams, 59, of Port O’Connor. “They’ve been giving answers like needles in a haystack.” “They got Coast Guard and everybody in the world down there except the local people,” Williams said. Read more here victoriaadvocate 07:21

Shrimpers stay vigilant after oil spill – Read more here  07:46

Louisiana seeking temporary exemption from TEDs – Shrimpers are fighting the impact of debris left by Hurricane Isaac

In two letters sent to Dr Jane Lubchenco, undersecretary of commerce for oceans and atmosphere and administrator of NOAA, the Washington delegation is asking her for a “temporary exemption from

federal TED requirements for inland and offshore shrimp trawlers.” The letters were signed by members including Senators Mary Landrieu and David Vitter, as well as House Members Cedric Richmond,

Jeff Landry and John Fleming, MD.,,,,,,,,“This impact will last approximately three months until the winter storms can help dissipate the debris,” said Gerica. “Right now, shrimpers cannot work at all. They’ve been dropping test nets  which have been coming up completely full of debris.” Remarkably, openings in the TEDs are getting jammed so quickly that bycatch are unable to escape

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