Tag Archives: Trident Seafoods

At Seattle-based seafood giant Trident, a new generation is at the helm

Joe Bundrant’s first Alaska summer with Trident Seafoods was back in 1979, a tense time for the Seattle-based company founded by his father Chuck Bundrant. The Bristol Bay salmon run was in full swing. But a bitter strike over low prices kept nets out the water, and shut down the regional harvest. Chuck Bundrant had piled up debt to build the Bountiful, a 165-foot processing vessel that was then only a year old. He didn’t want it to sit idle. So, he urged the fishermen to cross the picket line and allow him to freeze their sockeye catch. When the season was over, he pledged to settle with them on a fair market value “He just said, ‘Trust me.’ And those guys went fishing. It was a very powerful lesson for a young guy,” click here to read the story 12:35

Federal Judge Evokes Dr. Seuss in Upholding Seafood Regulations

Invoking Dr. Seuss, a federal judge on Monday quoted from the 1960 classic “One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish” to uphold a regulatory regime intended to cut down on seafood fraud and protect U.S. fishers from unfair competition. Despite a challenge to the rule by a slew of U.S. seafood importers, harvesters and processors, U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta found that the traceability rule, which requires importers to document the supply chain of imports from their origin to their arrival in the U.S., was lawfully implemented by the National Marine Fisheries Service. click here to read the story 18:32

Hiring seafood workers in Bristol Bay has been tough for years. This summer, it’s worse.

Seafood processors in Alaska’s Bristol Bay this summer have had trouble finding enough workers to handle the fish that come through their plants. Those in the industry say a confluence of factors, including a lack of visas for bringing foreign workers to the industry, a hotter economy in the Lower 48, and a record-breaking salmon run in Bristol Bay, was to blame. “There was a significant lack of process workers for some companies in the bay, and it exacerbated the problems of having to deal with high levels of harvest,” said John Garner, president of Seattle-based North Pacific Seafoods, which has locations across Alaska. Some processors couldn’t keep up with the huge amount of fish coming in, which forced them to resort to whatever method was fastest to get the pounds through the plant. click here to read the story 10:03

The Man Who Got Americans to Eat Trash Fish Is Now a Billionaire

Chuck Bundrant was a college freshman with $80 in his pocket when he drove halfway across the country to Seattle to earn a few bucks fishing. The year was 1961. He hasn’t stopped fishing since. And today, Bundrant, the founder and majority owner of Trident Seafoods, is worth at least $1.1 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.,,, Chuck Bundrant’s story is the stuff of industry legend. “He knew nothing about fishing boats, or catching and processing crab and salmon,’’ son Joe said in a corporate video two years ago. “He’d only watched a movie with John Wayne in it called ‘North to Alaska.’ And he heard there was money to be made on the fishing grounds, thousands and thousands of miles from home.’’ After a few years, Bundrant was looking for a way to start a business in the industry. He met two other crab fishermen — Kaare Ness and Mike Jacobson — and in 1973 the three put their money together and built the Billikin, a 135-foot boat that changed the seafood industry, according to Trident’s corporate history. click here to read the story 19:06

Trident Seafoods officially opens $40m East Coast plant, which is expected to employ 175 workers

tridentplant-265x300Seattle, Washington-based Trident Seafoods on Thursday officially opened the company’s $40 million value-added processing and research and development plant in Carrollton, Georgia, the company said. The plant comes as the company said it intends to grow business in the eastern United States. With an 88,000-square-foot manufacturing floor, 18,000 square feet of office space and 20,000 square feet of support area, the plant will produce seafood products cut from pollock, cod, salmon, halibut, tilapia, sole and mahi mahi. Read the rest here 13:31

Odoriferous : Trident engineers address odor issues at plant

Residents throughout town have been noticing the smell since early July. “My wife was commenting on it just the other day,” said Jerry Pirtle, a local gillnetter. “The smell is bad. Especially on a day like today with a westerly wind and you just want to be out enjoying the weather.” Pirtle, whose home is on 1st Street, on the hill over-looking Trident’s plant. “It’s pretty dissatisfying,” he said. Isaacson said the company has received phones calls and emails from residents. At least one local turned to graffiti to send his message. Read the rest here 08:36

Russian pollock sector soon to be as consolidated as US – 2 Foreign Companies OWN 50% of all US POLLOCK

The industry will follow the model of the US pollock sector, with the top five Russian companies controlling 80% of the quota in 2015-2016, states Osadchiy’s presentation from the event, held last week in Bergen, Norway. In the US, Trident Seafoods, Maruha Nichiro, Nippon Suisan Kaisha (Nissui) and American Seafoods Group control 80% of the TAC. Trident has 25% of the TAC, Maruha Nichiro, through its mothership vessels and Westward Seafoods and Alyeska Seafoods processing plants, has 22%; Nissui has 18% through Unisea; with American Seafoods and its fleet of factory vessels harvesting 16%. Read the rest here 18:59

Western Alaska Fisheries cannery in Kodiak Sale Price is $37-Million

   A few weeks ago when KMXT first told you of Trident Seafood’s purchase of the Western Alaska Fisheries cannery in Kodiak, CEO Joe Bundrant declined to reveal the sale price, saying as a privately-owned company, they preferred to keep such information private.  However, the company Trident purchased Western from, Japan-based Maruha Nichiro, is a publicly-traded company, and as such must report its financial dealings.  Read the rest here 11:54

Trident Seafoods to acquire Western Alaska Fisheries’ Japanese owned assets

US-based Trident Seafoods has agreed to acquire the assets of Western Alaska Fisheries in Kodiak, Alaska, from Westward Seafoods, which is owned by Maruha-Nichiro. Trident in an announcement Monday says it has signed a letter of intent to purchase the plant. A purchase price was not announced. Read the rest here 17:44

Trident Seafoods charged for late fish tickets

Alaska state law requires commercial fish processors to record each catch on an AFG-approved fish ticket, which must be submitted to a local representative within seven days after landing. Charging documents indicate Trident’s fish tickets were between five and 12 days late. Read the rest here 09:51

Nets Mended, Boots Packed. Fish Boats Head For Alaska

Big factory ships are heading out to sea, and in coming weeks, 10,000 people from Washington state will head north to the Alaska fishing grounds. Half of all the seafood caught in the U.S. comes from the Alaska fishery. Seattle is its base, and the biggest players are the companies that own catcher-processor ships. They include Trident Seafoods, Glacier Fish Company and American Seafoods Group. Crews have spent the last few weeks getting the ships ready. At Interbay’s Pier 91 on Monday, the Northern Eagle, a ship owned by American Seafoods, prepared for its journey. Read more here 19:53:34

Trident Seafoods and Georgia Governor Nathan Deal on Wednesday announced the company will open seafood processing facility

The plant will create 175 jobs and is a USD 41 million (EUR 30.9 million)  investment in the state of Georgia. morehere

Woman gets jail for embezzling about $500,000 from seafood plant

The U.S. attorney’s office says in a release that 33-year-old Isairis Wolfe of Kodiak was sentenced in U.S. District Court in Anchorage on Monday. Prosecutors said Wolfe claimed methamphetamine use clouded her judgment. [email protected]

Kodiak man gets prison for seafood plant theft

KODIAK, Alaska (AP) — A Kodiak man will serve more than two years in a federal prison for his part of a scheme to defraud the Trident Seafoods plant of nearly a half million dollars. Jeremy Smith, 31, was sentenced this week,  also indicted were Anne Wilson, who is also known as Anne Sorio, of Kent, Wash.; Valerie Olivares, of Corpus Christi, Texas; and Jamie Fathke, of Kodiak. continued @ WestPort News

Two sentenced for roles in Kodiak embezzlement scheme from Trident Seafoods

A Kodiak man and a woman from Corpus Christi, Texas, were sentenced Tuesday in Anchorage federal court for their roles in embezzling more than half a million dollars from Trident Seafoods of Kodiak. continued

Date set for rockfish lawsuit hearing – To my Alaska Connection – ABOLISH CATCH SHARES NOW!

U.S. District Court judge Marsha Pechman has announced that a long-awaited hearing on the fate of the new Kodiak rockfish catch share plan will take place Nov. 19. Pechman, the chief judge in the district court for western Washington, will hear the case that pits Trident Seafoods, Ocean Beauty, Westward Seafoods and North Pacific Seafoods against the federal government. The processors contend that the rockfish program, which transitioned to full operation this year after a five-year pilot program, gives fishermen an unfair advantage in price negotiations. The key point of contention is a clause in the rockfish program that allows fishermen to freely shift among cooperatives that each deliver to a single processor. This allows fishermen to shift their deliveries to the processor offering the best price. Under the pilot program, fishermen were locked into a cooperative and could not shift.

Oh, go CRY ME A RIVER!!!  Why is it the largest and most global fish corporations hate competition, want the ‘stability’ of restraints of trade, and hate to pay “the rational price” (natural prices) – while being given permanent access to public resources without paying a dime for them, just like the IFQ special interests in the Coops?  We all know “why” …  winners and losers, rich get richer … labor gets enslaved… (broken record, sing to choir, …yawn). I predict the judge will rule against the processors (and rightfully so) for their “un-American” filing.  Next, we have to make sure Sen. Murkowski or some other crooked pol doesn’t slip new end-run language in an appropriations bill.

Five Indicted on Charges of Embezzling Nearly $500,000 From Trident Seafoods Five people with ties to Kodiak, Alaska

Five people with ties to Kodiak, Alaska have been indicted on charges of wire fraud related to the embezzlement of almost $500,000 from Trident Seafoods. US Attorney Karen Loeffler made the announcement Oct. 1 in Anchorage.
 According to the indictment, one of the five used her position as a bookkeeper for Trident in Kodiak to write Trident checks to the other four from January 2008 through August 2010. The allegations say the bookkeeper used her check writing authority with Trident to draft some 52 checks on a Trident account and made them payable to those four, as well as to her minor son. The five adults shared the proceeds of the checks, the indictment alleges. It is further alleged that the bookkeeper concealed the fraud by creating fraudulent accounting records so that the payments appeared to be legitimate. Assistant US Attorney Aunnie Steward, who presented the case to the grand jury, indicated that the law provides for a maximum total sentence of 20 years in prison, a $250,000 fine or both for each count, as well as restitution of the embezzled funds. The actual sentence imposed would be based on the seriousness of the offenses and the prior criminal history, if any, of the defendants. The Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Kodiak Police Department assisted in investigating the case. http://fnonlinenews.blogspot.com/2012/10/five-indicted-on-charges-of-embezzling.html