New Jersey Fishermen Demand a Say in Decisions on Offshore Wind Farms

Fishermen insisted Monday to a congressional subcommittee looking at offshore wind energy that they be consulted,,, Fishermen should have been brought into the planning process from the start, Peter Hughes, of Atlantic Cape Fisheries, told U.S. House members from New Jersey and California who were holding a hearing at the Jersey Shore. “Look at these slides,” he said, referring to diagrams of where proposed wind projects would be built. “They’re right smack dab where we are fishing. This is going to put people out of business.” >click to read< 14:26

Federal subcommittee hearing opens lines of communication between offshore energy company and fishers – Photo’s  >click to read<  19:28

Copeland man accused in his father’s death aboard a fishing boat in March sentenced

A Copeland man accused in his father’s death aboard a fishing boat in March was sentenced to just fewer than 10 years in prison at the federal courthouse in Fort Myers on Monday. Casey Hickok, 32, originally faced a second-degree murder charge and was accused of bludgeoning the sleeping Robert Hickok, 54 of Copeland, to death with an alternator aboard the fishing boat No Bitchin’ on March 18.  >click to read< 14:07

Humpy catch ends, coho opener wait for rain

“We still haven’t gotten a lot of rain, so we’re tracking behind in escapement and the (coho) commercial harvest is below anticipated,” said Jeremy Botz, gillnet area management biologist for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game in Cordova. “We had been fishing once a week and now we have been closed for more than a week.” The last opener for coho salmon was Sept. 2. >click to read< 12:59

Offshore Wind Energy Looks More Promising for Oregon

A stretch of the Pacific Ocean off the coast between Humboldt County, California, and Coos Bay, Oregon, has some of the highest wind power generating potential in the country. The area north of the California border looks particularly promising to green energy advocates because the region already has a functioning electric grid. But a past attempt to install five floating turbines off Coos Bay faced rising costs and opposition from the fishing industry, and was eventually moved to California when no one could be found to buy the high-priced power the facility planned to generate. >click to read< 11:24

A no-deal Brexit would likely end access for French boats to British waters

Sophie Leroy, whose Armement Cherbourgeois company operates three fishing vessels off the northwest coast of France, says there have been almost daily checks of their boats by the British authorities. Earlier this month, her boats were stopped for what she described as an interminable set of checks 21 miles off the English coast. Her boats were also surrounded by 15 British fishing vessels, she said. “And they were saying, ‘We are going to do the same as what the French did to us last year’. >click to read<  10:15

A trip with the lone company chasing menhaden in a 140-year tradition on the Chesapeake Bay

It’s an industry that once made the village of Reedville one of the most prosperous in the state — big, brightly-painted three-story Victorian mansions, bedecked with gingerbread woodwork under their generous shade trees line Main Street in testimony to those long gone days. These days, menhaden are at the center of an obscure, if fiercely fought, political battle over who should catch them where, and whether the Omega Proteins fleet that still sails from Reedville is harvesting too many from the Bay. Among the reasons for that concern: Menhaden are an important food source for striped bass. Photo’s >click to read< 07:54

UPDATED: Blockage removed from Skinners Pond harbour entrance

An excavator spent most of the day Saturday on the south block of the Skinners Pond Harbour breakwater, scooping seaweed out of the port’s entrance. That’s after about a half dozen boats got caught up in the seaweed while returning to port on low tide Friday afternoon.,,, “We did it as quickly as we could for the safety of all the fishermen,” Doyle said of Saturday’s cleanup. Sixty-one lobster boats fish out of Skinners Pond.  >click to read< 21:07

State officials to field questions on offshore wind at meetings on LI

The state and wind-farm developers are expected to face questions about cost, views and impacts on fishing and birds at three open-house informational meetings,,,, “I’m petrified of them,” said Mark Phillips, one of the most experienced commercial fishermen on Long Island and one of the last operating out of Greenport. His chief concern, he said, is the turbines’ potential impact on the region’s vital squid fishery.,,, “The potential to lose the whole inshore squid fishery is real to me,” he said. >click to read<  17:02

South Atlantic Fishery Management Council Meeting September 16 – 20, 2019 in Charleston, SC

The public is invited to attend the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council to be held in Charleston, SC, Town & Country Inn, 2008 Savannah Highway, Charleston, SC 29407. >click here< for Agenda details. >click here< for Webinar Registration: >Click here< To visit the SAFMC >click here< 16:03

Legislators say Pebble mine could spark a cataclysmic mistake

Claims of Gov. Mike Dunleavy to a potential investor in the Pebble mine project that the state will actively help defend the project from “frivolous and scurrilous attacks” are drawing a sharp rebuttal from 20 Alaska legislators and the Bristol Bay Native Corp. In their Sept. 9 letter to Randy Smallwood, president and chief executive officer of Wheaton Precious Metals Corp., in Vancouver, British Columbia, the legislators said that while the mine “may provide some economic benefit to Alaska, it sits near the headwaters of the largest salmon run in the world. Dewatering and re-routing these headwaters could devastate our cherished resource, as would a single cataclysmic mistake.” >click to read<  13:28

Aquaculture poses threat to the lobster industry

As president of the Maine Lobstering Union, I know we have struggled with several concerns this summer from right whales to bait shortages to aquaculture leases. We need to take steps now to fix rules and regulations around aquaculture. If we don’t, it will encroach on ocean space for everyone. The lease sizes have gotten so large we are making Maine’s oceans attractive to out-of-state corporations. By Rock Alley >click to read< 11:40

13 years ago, the Nature Conservancy desperately wanted to protect groundfish. Now it wants you to eat them

In 2006, the crash of the groundfish population — bottom-dwelling fish like petrale sole, chilipepper rockfish and sand dabs that used to be common on Bay Area tables — led the Nature Conservancy to buy up 13 fishing permits and some California fishermen’s vessels. The state worked with a handful of the state’s remaining groundfish trawlers to change how they fish and protect vulnerable habitat. Now that groundfish populations have rebounded, the Nature Conservancy wants the public to know they’re OK to eat again. >click to read< (if you don’t get propaganda sick) 10:27

Nation’s first mega-offshore wind project stalled for additional study

On most afternoons in Point Judith, Rhode Island, commercial fisherman Brian Loftus steers his trawler back into port after a 12-hour day. Loftus unloaded some 1,500 pounds of whiting, scup, skate and squid. Estimated revenue: $3,000. Loftus has fished for three decades here, but to him there’s a looming problem: Offshore wind developers plan to plop turbines more than 70 stories high into his fishing grounds. >click to read< 08:46

“We don’t even know what the rules of the road are,” Fishermen unsatisfied with wind turbine plans

Rhode Island commercial fishermen sat down a year ago with offshore wind developers, they say they made it clear that for the sake of navigational safety the minimum spacing of any turbines installed in ocean waters needs to be at least one nautical mile in every direction.,,,“It’s the exact thing we’ve been saying for years,” said Lanny Dellinger, the Newport lobsterman who chairs the board. “That’s the minimal ask for us.”,,,In Rhode Island, representatives of Ørsted were conciliatory and the meeting was generally cordial, but at the heart of the discussions over the South Fork project is a larger clash between two industries, one legacy and the other nascent,,, >click to read<  07:46

Skipper appears in court after trawler is escorted to shore

The fishing trawler, the Mestre Bobicha, was escorted to Castletownbere by the LE Samual Beckett,where skipper Jose Ramon Perez Sampedro was charged with fishing with buoys that were not correctly marked, contrary to European fishery regulations. When the vessel was inspected, it was found to have several tonnes of blue shark on board. >click to read< 17:21

Louisiana Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries: report of loss linked to Bonnet Carre Spillway opening

“This is the worst I’ve ever seen it in my life,” Shrimper Charles Robin said. Robin is a shrimper in Yscloskey. He said his catch dropped by more than half this year compared to last. “Last year on average I’d catch a thousand or 1,200 pounds a day on a slow day. Now, you can’t even catch 500 pounds,” Robin said. According to Wildlife and Fisheries, brown shrimp landings are down 34 to 44 percent compared to the five year average. St. Bernard Parish President Guy McInnis said he’s actively pushing for an Emergency Fisheries Declaration in Washington, D.C.  Video, >click to read<16:33

Fishermen want to see studies from Northern Pulp

A fishermen’s working group, representing fishermen from Nova Scotia, P.E.I. and New Brunswick, is concerned that Northern Pulp (NPNS) has not replied to their written request to share completed reports and studies relating to the company’s proposed new effluent treatment facility. “We emailed Northern Pulp over a week ago, requesting that they send us all completed studies and reports within seven calendar days,” says Jamie Simpson, lawyer for the group, which is based in Pictou, N.S.  “To date, we have not received a response.” >click to read< 13:56

“Why I came to Alaska”, Israeli filmmaker documents fishing experience

The local seining industry is the star of a short video produced by Yonatan Belik, an Israeli filmmaker and traveler who spent the summer working as a skiffman in Kodiak. Belik, 29, said he happened upon Kodiak by chance. While hitchhiking in Israel, a stranger recommended he go fishing in Alaska.,,, Belik worked between June and August on the Abby Jo, a 37-foot seiner captained by Jake Organ. Organ grew up in Chugiak but has spent his summers fishing in Kodiak since his youth. At the age of 28, this is Organ’s first summer as captain. >click to read<  12:58

The Hamptons love green energy. But that wind farm?

This affluent enclave on the East End of Long Island is steeped in eco-conscious pride, with strict water quality and land preservation rules and an abundance of electric cars on the roads. So at first, many happily embraced a plan for an offshore wind farm that would help lead the way as New York State sets some of the most ambitious green energy goals in the country. But then came word that the project’s transmission cable was going to land in Wainscott, one of the most exclusive slices of the already exclusive Hamptons, where homeowners include the likes of the cosmetics billionaire Ronald Lauder and Marci Klein, a former longtime producer of “Saturday Night Live” and the daughter of Calvin Klein. >click to read< 08:21

Boat and 26 chinook seized amid allegations of overfishing off B.C.’s coast by 3 non-residents

Vancouver Island RCMP have seized a nine-metre fishing boat and more than two dozen chinook salmon over what they say are allegations of “significant overfishing.”The RCMP say they received a report Wednesday of possible Fisheries Act violations by those aboard the vessel on the west side of Vancouver Island near Nootka Sound. In a news release, police allege officers with the Fisheries Department found more than two dozen chinook salmon, about 24 kilograms of salmon roe, 18 rock cod fillets and eight ling cod fillets. >click to read<  19:39

Hurricane Dorian: Governor Cooper requests major disaster declaration for NC counties

North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper requested a major disaster declaration from President Trump’s office Friday. The disaster declaration covers Brunswick, Carteret, Craven, Currituck, Dare, Duplin, Hyde, New Hanover, Pamlico, Pender, Sampson, Tyrrell and Washington counties and would trigger FEMA assistance. >click to read< 18:01 North Carolina’s Disaster Relief Fund approaches $6 million>click to read<

FISH-NL – Which Side Are You On?

Click the image to play the video! 14:18

LePage And The Whales

Fisheries managers from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are developing new rules that are likely to fall heavily on the lobster industry in New England, especially in Maine, where fishing activity is greatest.,,, Maine’s lobstermen and lobsterwomen found an ally in former Gov. Paul LePage, who recently wrote an op-ed in The Wall Street Journal decrying the proposed rules as misdirected and unnecessary. >click to read<  13:14

Bahamas: Hurricane Dorian impact a “big setback” for fishing industry

Bahamian fishermen fear that Hurricane Dorian’s destruction in the northern Bahamas will result in the fishing industry losing as much as 30 to 40 per cent in revenue, with the Bahamas Commercial Fishers Alliance (BCFA) vice-president saying “it’s going to be a big setback for the industry”. Keith Carroll told Eyewitness News that at least 95 per cent of fishermen in the northern Bahamas have lost their boats.  >click to read< 11:34

Salmon Tales: Sex, myth and molecular genetics of an iconic fish

A sockeye salmon’s life ends right back where it began, culminating in an anadromous drama of sex, decay and sacrifice. Patty Zwollo says that it’s all part of sexual maturation in salmon: They swim up out of the Pacific into the same streams in which they were born and into the lives, literature and religion of the native peoples of the drainages. >click to read< 10:34

North Carolina Fisheries Association Weekly Update for Sept 13 , 2019

HAPPY FRIDAY THE 13th! May today be your very lucky day! – Legislative updates, Bill updates, Calendar, >Click here to read the Weekly Update<, to read all the updates >click here<, for older updates listed as NCFA >click here<08:48

Salmon collapse hitting workers hard

Don Sananin has loved the sea and fishing since he started in the industry as a 17-year-old.,,,But after more than 50 years working as a commercial fisherman, the Burnaby man hasn’t seen a salmon season as grim as this year’s. Sananin, 70, who holds a licence for the area that includes the Fraser River to the west coast of Vancouver Island, hasn’t been out on the water yet. “There hasn’t been an opening,” he said. “The sockeye is the worst it’s ever been since the 1890s.”,,, “The impacts are on fishermen, plant workers, net menders, and reduction plant workers, from Lax Kw’alaams [in northern B.C.] all the way down to White Rock and all the places in between.” >click to read<  17:21

Does Pew win the Forage fish war for the enviro’s? Final Opportunity to Comment on Herring Protections

“After 10 years of debate, the New England Fishery Management Council has finally accepted the proposals favored by Cape communities and what would keep midwater trawls off our coast year round. It will have benefits for all our commercial and recreational fisheries and the nearshore ecosystem,” said John Pappalardo, chief executive officer of the Cape Cod Commercial Fishermen’s Alliance. The protections were vetted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and were recently published on the Federal Register for final comment. “This is it,” said Pappalardo. >click to read< 15:55

“We’re gonna bomb your bleeping ships”, You understand me? – Coast Guard seeks tips for threatening radio broadcast

The Coast Guard is seeking information regarding a person making threats and hoax calls on marine band radio off the gulf coast of Florida. Coast Guard Sector St. Petersburg command center received the latest threat on Aug. 13, 2019 via VHF channel 22A. In this call, the male caller makes threats against the Coast Guard personnel, aircrafts and vessels. The broadcast sounds like the same person who has made other radio broadcasts that start with MAYDAY three times and then talks about, “scrambling all jets we are under nuclear attack.” >click to read, listen< 13:43

Starkist Hit With $100M Fine in Seafood Price-Fixing Scheme

Starkist must pay a $100 million criminal fine for conspiring to fix packaged seafood prices, a federal judge ruled Wednesday, despite arguments it could bankrupt the company or cause its employees to lose jobs. “I think it’s in the interest of the economy not to bankrupt Starkist, but the court has the leverage to extend the payments out,”,,  Starkist general counsel and senior vice president Robert Scott Meece said the company has about 100 employees at its Pittsburgh headquarters and 2,100 working at a factory in American Samoa. “These employees have had this hanging over their heads for a long time,” >click to read< 12:00