Monthly Archives: September 2020

Coast Guard and Royal Bahamas Defense Force seize more than 12,000 lbs. of IUU Fishing catch off Bahamas

Watchstanders from the Coast Guard’s Operation Bahamas and Turks and Caicos operation center coordinated with RBDF crews to board two commercial fishing vessels, El Ship and Angel Gabriel, which had 83 fishermen aboard. The RBDF boarding team seized more than 12,000 pounds of illegally caught fish and lobster. The partnership between the Coast Guard and RBDF to catch these illegal fishermen came just days after the Coast Guard released a new strategy to enhance global safety, security, and stewardship of the maritime domain by combating Illegal, Unreported, and Unregulated (IUU) fishing. photos, >click to read< 21:51

Northern Fishermen in Norway Want to Go It Alone

Last week, the Norwegian Fishermen’s Association, Division North (NFA North) decided to exit from the Norwegian Fishermen’s Association. The proposal to leave was approved with only one vote against.,, members and local chapters are dissatisfied with the fact that issues they raise are not sufficiently followed up on a national level within the NFA. What kind of issues? According to Hansen, one of the problems is that larger and modern coastal vessels have built up so that they can fish efficiently out in the open seas and also fish in areas near the coast, areas with fish on which the traditional coast-based fleet depends. >click to read< 20:00

Jersey Shore Seafood Made Simple! Shawn & Sue talk fishing and seafood with Jim Lovgren

Like everyone else, our local fishermen have been hit hard by the economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic. Support your local fishermen by purchasing fresh seafood from these participating markets & restaurants. Then, use their own recipes at the bottom of this page to prepare yourself a  delicious meal. This is a great interview, and Jim covers a lot of issues from Coronavirus to offshore wind farms, conservation, and the beginnings of the NMFS, and the 200 Mile limit. >click to listen<, as you scroll though the article for locations and recipe’s! 15:04

Fishing group asks Baker to fight ‘crippling’ monitor measure

The Northeast Seafood Coalition is trying to enlist Gov. Charlie Baker in its campaign against the monitoring measure that it charges has the “strong potential” to financially cripple the state’s commercial groundfish industry. The Gloucester-based coalition sent Baker a letter last Friday laying out its case that Amendment 23, which will set future monitoring levels for sector-based, Northeast commercial groundfish vessels is highly flawed and should be withdrawn by the New England Fishery Management Council. >click to read< 12:47

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 51’X22′ Fiberglass Longliner, Cummins Diesel, Permits Available

To review specifications, information and 5 photos, >click here< To see all the boats in this series, >click here< 12:01

A Lobsterman Slogs On Through the Pandemic

Mike Dawson (self-employed) Location: New Harbor, Maine Employees: 1 Status: Open, essential industry.  During the summer, “catch landings are probably down. But we can gain quite a lot in October, November, and December,” says Mike Dawson, a lobsterman who fishes off the coast of Maine. “August was kind of slow. Not an overabundance of lobster.” But Dawson this year is still grappling with the tepid demand and disruption caused by the pandemic. Lobster recently fetched $3.60 a pound for soft-shell, down from $4.05 a year ago. The occasional hard-shell lobster—which is rarer to catch at this point in the growing season for lobster—got $4 a pound, down about 25 cents a pound from a year ago. >click to read< 09:41

‘Ain’t no hurricane going to stop Joe Patti’s’ – Shrimp boat captains docked behind Joe Patti’s devastated

Joe Patti’s Seafood bore a beating, but the iconic Pensacola seafood market expects to survive the hit dealt by Hurricane Sally. “We got it on the chin,” However, it’s likely a different story for the fishing boat fleet that docks behind the Joe Patti’s warehouse. Seven of the nine shrimp boats — which are primarily captained by Vietnamese immigrants, many of whom lack maritime insurance — were ravaged by the hurricane. Standing on the wharf behind Joe Patti’s on Tuesday morning, it looked like a battleship had turned its guns on the small fishing fleet. Where there had been docks, scraps of driftwood bobbed in the shallow water. Shrimp boats with punctured hauls sat on the bottom of the harbor. 45 photos, >click to read< 08:44

U.S. Coast Guard rescues two fishermen from a grounded fishing vessel in Neka Bay

The Coast Guard rescued two fishermen Tuesday from a grounded fishing vessel in Neka Bay, south of Hoonah. Coast Guard Cutter John McCormick arrived on scene at approximately 8:34 a.m. and launched a small boat crew who rescued the operator and a crew member from the fishing vessel Reluctant. No injuries were reported. The Coast Guard received Reluctant’s initial report about running aground at about 8:30 a.m. photos, >click to read< 07:25

The historic ups and downs of the Acadian-Mi’kmaq relationship

Mi’kmaq fishermen, emboldened by a decades-old Supreme Court of Canada ruling affirming their treaty right to hunt, fish and gather in pursuit of a moderate livelihood, spent another day trying to drop their lobster traps in the waters there. Pitted against them were non-indigenous fishers who claim that the natives are threatening the local lobster fishery’s sustainability, and who have been making their point by cutting First Nation traps, and trying to pressure buyers not to purchase their harvest. Once again, the federal government stood mutely by, unwilling to clarify the question of what constitutes a “moderate livelihood” fishery, and then, by omission, further fuelling a situation that looks like it could turn violent at any moment. It sounds, therefore, strangely like the scene I encountered 21 years ago in Burnt Church, N.B. >click to read< 17:38

Three jailed after being caught with 109 undersized lobsters, out of season stone crab claws in the Keys

Three Lower Keys residents were jailed Friday after state fish and wildlife police said they were found with more than 100 undersized lobsters and a haul of out-of-season stone crab claws. Many of the crab claws were also undersized, police said. Rigoberto Morales, 52, of Stock Island, was the captain on the ESPY vessel, which was headed into shore near Stock Island carrying the illegal catch when officers on patrol decided to check their catch, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Two crew members, Charles William Rahming, 27, of Key West, and Arlem Silva, 34, were also booked into the Stock Island Detention Center along with Morales on a number of charges. >click to read< 13:38

Federal inaction drives lobster feud

A Coast Guard cutter and two helicopters (one RCMP, one DFO) provided little more than backdrop scenery to the boiling tensions on the Acadian shore Monday. Both the First Nations encamped behind a barricade at the Saulnierville Wharf and the predominantly Acadian local fishermen with their own roadblock at the Meteghan wharf 14 kilometres away called on the federal authorities to uphold the law. But whose law do they uphold? Successive federal fisheries ministers have kicked the issue down the election cycle by providing commercial licenses to First Nations bands without negotiating the Supreme Court of Canada acknowledged right of individual Mi’kmaq to make a moderate livelihood off of natural resources. The vacuum left by their inaction is being filled with threats, flares and rubber bullets. >click to read< 10:29

BETA expected to stall inland over Texas – Teddy to bring heavy rain, strong winds, destructive waves to Nova Scotia

Tropical Storm Beta is forecast to weaken and gradually lose tropical characteristics while spreading flooding rains further inland across the lower Mississippi Valley… >click to read< ,, Hurricane Teddy Public Advisory – Interests in Atlantic Canada should closely monitor the progress of Teddy. >click to read<

Hurricane Teddy’s impact on Massachusetts: Coastal flooding, large breaking waves as high as 24 feet and winds as strong as 55 mph in the forecast >click to read<  09:09

Video – A fisherman is rescued after being adrift at sea for three days in an ice box

This is the incredible moment a fisherman was rescued after spending three days drifting out at sea clinging to an ice box. Udin Diman, 46, was found holding on to the orange box off the coast in North Maluku province, Indonesia, on September 17. He had left his home three days earlier to catch some seafood to sell – but he didn’t return that evening. His boat toppled and capsized over so he clung to the ice chest and had drifted in it for days.  >video, photos, click to read< 08:09

Oregon men caught setting stolen crab traps await trial

“Don’t say another word,” he told his friend. “I’ll be right there. Don’t go anywhere and don’t tell anyone.” Two men caught setting stolen crab traps in Cape Falcon Marine Reserve of the north Oregon coast await trial following a joint effort of citizen reporting and solid detective work. Bob Browning has fished Oregon waters all his life. He started fishing off the Garibaldi dock with his family when he was five years old. When he saw a strange object bobbing on the ocean surface, he pointed it out to his client, Dr. Sarah Henkel. Browning steered “The Lady Lee” in for a closer look.,, Browning threaded the rope through his hydraulic lift and started the motor. When a crab pot broke the surface of the water, they knew there was trouble. The line continued. Another crab pot rose from the depths. They reached for their phones to report it. The Investigation,,, >click to read< 18:37

How much like the eel are we?

“The Book of Eels” is as much about origins and meaning as it is about eels. Once people comprehend the eel’s astonishing life journey, it’s difficult not to identify, seek metaphors of association and anthropomorphize. The eels’ mysteries are ours as well. After millennia of study and conjecture, we now know that American and European eels get their start in the Sargasso Sea northeast of Cuba. We also know that the nascent eels – tiny, transparent, flat larvae that are shaped like willow leaves – float off on currents either to America or Europe. Upon arriving at a predestined coast, their transformed little bodies smoothly transition from salt to freshwater. They choose a brook or stream and eventually settle down at some spot – random or not is unknown >click to read< 15:22

Nova Scotia Commercial fishermen turn focus to alleged buyer in Mi’kmaw lobster dispute

Commercial fishermen in southwestern Nova Scotia say they are taking a different approach on Monday in the dispute around the new self-regulated lobster fishery launched by Sipekne’katik First Nation. After several days of hauling in traps belonging to the Mi’kmaw fishers, the commercial fishermen now say they are turning their attention toward those who they believe are buying Mi’kmaw-harvested lobster. “It’s with the federal government and it’s with people from within our own community who are facilitating the buying of illegal fishery products.” A large crowd gathered in protest Monday morning in front of an alleged buyer’s home in the community of Comeauville. >click to read< 13:49

Fishing dispute could close Cape Breton moose hunt

“Our people are angry,” said Rod Googoo, the chief of the Waycobah First Nation,,,  Googoo was among hundreds of Mi’kmaq who spent part of the weekend in Saulnierville, a small fishing port located between Digby and Yarmouth on the province’s southwestern coast. They were there to support to fishers from central Nova Scotia’s Sipekne’katik First Nation who took to the water last week after being issued lobster fishing licenses by their own band.,, The Waycobah chief, who is a key part of the Assembly of Nova Scotia Mi’kmaw Chiefs’ lands, wildlife and forestry involvement, went to social media with the suggestion that his people shut down this year’s moose hunt in Cape Breton. The idea was met with overwhelming support and encouragement. >click to read< 12:27

Teddy to bring ‘a nasty couple of days’ to P.E.I.

Teddy likely won’t be a hurricane when it gets to P.E.I., but its impact is likely to be felt Tuesday into Wednesday. “It’s going to be post-tropical when it gets here, but it’s going to be a nasty couple of days,,,  The rain is expected to start Tuesday morning, first in Kings County and working its way west. It will be breezy, with gusts up to 50 km, and those winds will get stronger as the day goes on. By afternoon winds could reach 50 km/h with gusts to 80. >click to read< 10:49

Coast Guard rescues 2 fishermen from disabled 48-foot shrimp boat

The Coast Guard rescued two people from a commercial fishing vessel Sunday near Lake Borgne. Coast Guard Sector New Orleans watchstanders received a report of two people aboard the disabled 48-foot shrimp boat Sau Nguyen taking on water due to inclement weather. >video, click to watch< 09:50

Nova Scotia Indigenous fishermen not backing down after traps removed

Indigenous and non-Indigenous fishermen have been locked in an ongoing dispute. Both sides say things were heated on the water on Sunday. “A Mi’kmaw fishermen went out to check his gear, and he was swarmed by commercial fishing vessels that were cutting him off and hauling their gear, stealing their traps – preventing our people from fishing,” says Sipekne’Katik First Nation Chief Michael Sack. “One of our boats was chased by a First Nations vessel, and they made an attempt to ram him and to board him,” says Sproul. “He immediately turned around and retreated here to Meteghan.” Sack says, while having their gear hauled up by commercial fishermen slows their operation a bit, they are in it for the long haul – with no plans to stop fishing. >video, click to read< 08:35

One of nature’s miracles: the salmonid species life cycle

This article describes the amazing way these species begin their lives in clear flowing creeks and streams near the coast, anywhere from the northwest to Northern California, travel miles downstream to enter the salty waters of the Pacific Ocean, mature for a number of years while traveling great distances, and then return to their home stream’s birthplace. At the beginning, the following verse from a popular illustrated children’s text titled Salmon Stream sets the scene: The egg of a salmon, born to travel, Hides in the nest of rocky gravel, Far beyond the shady pool,,, >click to read< 20:02

Tied-up fishing boats signal overseas worker crisis for industry

One fishing company is effectively out of business while others are bracing for large financial hits as the deepwater New Zealand industry, unable to get skilled foreign workers into the country, have begun tying up vessels. At least three New Zealand-flagged big autonomous trawler reefer (BATM) deepwater vessels associated with Canterbury based Independent fisheries have been tied up at Lyttleton as it repatriated its Russian and Ukranian crew following the end of their visa periods. Sealord now urgently needed 160 skilled fishers to crew the two vessels  >click to read< 18:49

Fishermen say they are removing Indigenous lobster traps in western Nova Scotia

Non-Indigenous fishermen say they are in the process of removing lobster traps set by fishermen from the Sipekne’katik First Nation in waters off western Nova Scotia. Colin Sproul, of the Fundy Inshore Fishermen’s Association, says a large number of boats are in St. Marys Bay and intend to remove the traps and take them to the wharf in Meteghan, N.S. Sproul says the fishermen are taking action on what they believe is an illegal out-of-season fishery because the Department of Fisheries and Oceans has refused to do so. But the Sipekne’katik First Nation says its people have a treaty right to fish at any time. ,, A clarification was issued by the court, which said the treaty right was subject to federal regulation. >click to read< 13:15

Asian carp processing facility might be headed to North Peoria

A former government adviser and official, Brian Colgan, leads a company that intends to convert a 4,000-square-foot building at 8606 N. Pioneer Road into an Asian carp processing, packaging and distribution facility. There the fish would be fashioned into bait for domestic crab, crawfish and lobster harvesters on all coasts. “Our company, Colgan Carp Solutions Inc., by creating these markets and working with others in the area who want to do the same, can drive up demand, can reduce the population in the Illinois River and hopefully create some jobs, economic opportunity and show that there’s a market-driven strategy for invasive-species management,” Colgan said. >click to read< 11:33

Gillnetters approve, anglers reel at Columbia River salmon policy change

A recent update to the state’s Columbia River salmon management policy to change harvest allocations and allow commercial gillnetting on the main stem has anglers reeling. “We’ve made a lot of changes over the last 30 years to how we fish in order to adjust to (federal Endangered Species Act) listings, in order to adjust to harvesting the best fish in the river at the best times,” said Robert Sudar, a commercial fishing advisor based in Longview. “It’s a totally different fishery than it was 30 to 40 years ago.” >click to read< 10:08

Weymouth Lifeboat crew pay emotional tribute to their friend and colleague

A spokesman for the lifeboat station said: It is with deep sadness that Weymouth RNLI lifeboat station and the family of the station’s Deputy Second Coxswain Trevor Brooker pay tribute to Trevor who passed away suddenly on Sunday,  September 13, in tragic circumstances for the crews at the lifeboat station. “Trevor was a professional local fisherman who owned and skippered a Weymouth fishing trawler. “He was a quiet man whose calming influence under the most challenging of conditions at sea could always be relied on. >click to read< 08:57

Application deadline extended for fish harvester benefits program – will have until Oct. 5th

Fishers financially impacted by the Coronavirus pandemic have two extra weeks to apply for the federal government’s Fish Harvester Benefit and Grant Program. The original Sept. 21 deadline is now extended to 3 p.m. on Oct. 5 for self employed harvesters to submit their applications online. In a press release Sept. 18, Fisheries Minister Bernadette Jordan encouraged anyone who thinks they may be eligible to visit the DFO website and learn how to apply. >click to read< 17:44

Nova Scotia: Fisheries Minister Bernadette Jordan asking sides to meet to de-escalate lobster fishing tensions

And late Friday afternoon the Assembly of Nova Scotia Mi’kmaw Chiefs declared a state of emergency for mainland Nova Scotia because of what it calls political unrest and violence. Early Friday evening Fisheries Minister Bernadette Jordan issued a statement,, “Our Government’s first priority is to ensure everyone involved remains safe. In Canada, anyone can participate in peaceful protests and that process is fundamental to our democracy,” she said. “At this time, it is imperative that all parties, and the public work together to lower tensions on the water and in our communities, to foster understanding between one another,,, “To that end, I’m extending an invitation for Indigenous leadership and industry leadership to meet with me as soon as possible. >click to read< 15:13

Southeast’s commercial Dungeness crab summer season the second highest on record

Commercial salmon fisheries in Southeast are looking to be a bust this year, but that’s not the case for Dungeness crab. This summer’s harvest ended up being the second highest on record. But the value of the fishery was not near a record breaker. Fishermen brought in 5.81 million pounds of crab in a commercial season that ran from mid-June to mid-August. Joe Stratman leads crab management in Southeast for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. “What was taken this summer is more than double the previous ten year average,” he said. >click to read< 11:40

Two fishermen rescued from Westray creel boat

Kirkwall RNLI came to the aid of a stricken fishing vessel aground on rocks off Westray on Friday. Two people were onboard the Kirkwall-registered creel boat Kingfisher. Kirkwall’s volunteer lifeboat crew arrived on the scene at 10.50am to find the vessel hard aground on a shelf of rock. They were assisted by two other vessels along with the Westray Coastguard team on the cliff top. >click to read< 10:31