Category Archives: National

Happy Fathers Day to the Fishermen Fathers at Sea Today

Happy Fathers Day to those fathers that are at sea today, providing for their family’s, and providing us with fresh seafood. Thank you. 10:00

‘Wicked Tuna’ captains re-up for 9th season

The hit National Geographic series “Wicked Tuna” has been renewed for a ninth season, and the finale of season eight airs this Sunday, June 16, at 9 p.m. in an extended 90-minute episode “The Final Tail.” “Wicked Tuna,” which is filmed on location in Gloucester and the surrounding waters, airs internationally on National Geographic in 171 countries and in 43 languages.  The producers have found that this television series has hooked millions of viewers not only from the region but from around the world. Mayor Sefatia Romeo Theken knows the city benefits from this wave of notoriety. “It’s great for the city as it continues to put us on the map,” she said. >click to read<22:03

ACLU Alleges Coast Guard Detained and Abused Fishermen

One night in the fall of 2017, four Jamaican fishermen set out into the Caribbean from the village of Half Moon Bay. As a lawsuit filed today describes it, their quest for tuna and snapper was supposed to last about two days. Then they disappeared. Five weeks later, those men—Robert Dexter Weir, Patrick Wayne Ferguson, Luther Fian Patterson, and David Roderick Williams—reemerged in Miami, covered in burns and blisters, according to the American Civil Liberties Union. United States Coast Guard officers had snatched them off their boat on suspicion of marijuana smuggling, then held them at sea for more than a month, shuffling them among various vessels en route to the U.S. to face trial, alleges the ACLU, which is suing the Coast Guard on the men’s behalf. >click to read<18:47   Weir v. U.S. – Complaint – >click to read<

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 47′ Steel Stern Trawler, CAT 3406B, With State, Federal Permits

Specifications, information and 7 photos >click here< To see all the boats in this series, >click here<10:56

Letter: More awareness needed of fish farms

To the editor: I went to the screening of “Lobster Wars” that occurred at the Cape Ann Museum on June 4. In the panel discussion after the movie, Larry Stepenuck was the only one who brought up the devastating effects and disturbances on the lobstermen and fishermen by the fish farms. These polluting enterprises and associated infrastructure take out huge chunks of the ocean that the fishermen and lobsermen could otherwise fish in (both vertically and horizontally). What’s left is getting slimmer all the time. Here, NOAA wants the lobstermen to develop ropeless lobster traps in order to protect the right whales. Meanwhile, NOAA and the Army Corps of Engineers turned around last year and awarded one of the Saltonstall-Kennedy grants to the development of a fish farm in the Critical Zone. A must read by Sue Waller, Rockport. >click to read<14:13

60-Day Notice of Intent to Sue NOAA under the Endangered Species Act Regarding Sea Grant’s Funding of Offshore Aquaculture Projects – >click to read<

Top brass exit Nature Conservancy amid sexual harassment investigation

#MeToo strikes again. This time it is within the world’s leading conservation organization, the Nature Conservancy. The first to exit the organization due to an investigation into sexual harassment and workplace misconduct were Mark Burget, head of the group’s North American operations, and Kacky Andrews, who led global programs.,,, Well, hold on. There’s more. Friday CEO Tercek resigned, just a week after McPeek’s exit.,,, Tercek joined The Nature Conservancy in 2008 from Goldman Sachs. (surely an environmentalist!),,, I’ll end with a little nugget I found. Friday Mary Kay, Inc., an original glass ceiling breaker among corporations offering opportunities to women, announced it has partnered with the Nature Conservancy in a program called the Texas Fisheries & Coastal Resilience Program. >click to read<18:27

Mary Kay Inc. Partners with The Nature Conservancy to Advance Sustainable Fishing in Gulf of Mexico – Mary Kay Inc., an international leader in corporate and social responsibility, today announced its partnership with The Nature Con – >click to read<

Drenched US documented its second-wettest May on record

While the continental United States recorded its wettest 12-month period in recorded history this year, historic flooding and record-shattering rainfall amounts landed May 2019 as the second-wettest month in the United States. Precipitation across the contiguous U.S. that accumulated over the June 2018 to May 2019 12-month period shattered the previous record for any 12-month period with 37.68 inches, 7.73 inches above average. “The previous June-May record was 35.47 inches and occurred from June 1982 to May 1983. The previous all-time 12-month record was 36.20 inches and occurred from May 2018 to April 2019,” Reppert said. (not a mention of climate change!)>click to read<14:42

Chill Wind Of Reality Blows Through The Green Energy Lobby

In recent weeks, some observers of the energy scene have been wondering if the long honeymoon of the renewables industry might finally have come to an end.,,, This is all very different to a couple of years ago when the wind industry and newspapers started shouting, in unison, that a new era of offshore wind was on the way. While a few spoilsports pointed out that there was almost certainly less to these announcements than met the eye, and wondered how exactly these alleged cost savings were to be achieved, the hype continued unabated. ,,, All this means that many environmentalists have pinned their hopes on offshore wind. There’s plenty of space out at sea, there are no neighbors to object, and the industry is saying that prices are going to drop through the floor. >click to read<13:08

North Pacific fish council enters Pebble debate, over state’s objections

The state of Alaska believes the North Pacific Fishery Management Council is overstepping its bounds, by weighing in on the Pebble Mine Project in Bristol Bay. A proposed comment letter drafted by the Council prompted a strong reaction from the state, during the Council’s June meeting in Sitka. During its Sitka meeting Wednesday morning (6-5-19), the Council reviewed a letter it planned to send to the Army Corps of Engineers commenting on the draft environmental impact statement — or DEIS — of the Pebble Mine. >Audio clip, click to read<08:54

Judge finds Shinnecock tribe member guilty of illegal fishing

A Southampton Town judge on Wednesday found a Shinnecock Indian Nation member guilty of a single count of failing to have the proper state license to fish for baby eels but found him not guilty on two other counts.  In acquitting former tribal trustee David Taobi Silva of the primary charges of possessing 247 baby eels beyond allowable limits, Town Court Justice Gary Weber found the search and seizure of Silva’s catch by state Department of Environmental officers “was not proven to be constitutional.”  He was found guilty of failing to have a marine commercial food fishing license and the use of a fyke fishing net in the harvest of eels. >click to read<16:36

D-Day: June 6, 1944

Inside General Eisenhower’s Sleepless Night Ahead of the D-Day Invasion – >click to read< On June 6, 1944, 150,000 Allied soliders arrived on the beaches of Normandy, France for the largest seaborn invasion in world history. “D-Day,” as it’s now referred, was a major tactical victory against the Nazis in Europe during World War II, and it is remembered as one of the most courageous operations in the history of international warfare.In photos: Nations mark the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasion ->click here to review< >click to read/view<14:42

Pink salmon disaster relief grant delayed to July 1

Dear Friends and Neighbors, I wanted to keep everyone in the loop regarding the follow-up to my pink salmon disaster relief update in last Friday’s paper. As I write this, it is Wednesday morning, June 5. It was anticipated that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) might release grant funding to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC) for distribution by this past Saturday. I reached out to Sen. Lisa Murkowski’s office on Monday to see if, in fact, that had occurred. The Senator’s office had contacted NOAA at the start-of-business on Monday and, disappointingly, the federal agency again failed to act by the June 1 deadline. >click to read<12:57

Organizations threaten NOAA with lawsuit over industrial ocean fish farm funding

Friends of the Earth and Center for Food Safety today formally accused the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration of violating the Endangered Species Act. The groups sent a letter to NOAA notifying them of their intent to sue over NOAA’s Sea Grant program which has funded an industrial ocean fish farm in violation of federal law.  In October 2018, Sea Grant awarded a federal grant to a floating factory farm for non-native Steelhead trout off the coast of New Hampshire. According to a limited number of records gathered pursuant to a Freedom of Information Act request, these funds were provided without fulfillment of Endangered Species Act mandates. >click to read<10:55

NOAA accused over funding for industrial ocean fish farm – >click to read<

D-Day confidential: How four Canadian soldiers made it through their longest day

A fisherman, a farmer, a labourer and a civil servant were among the thousands who fought in the Allied invasion that turned the tide of the Second World War. For decades, the records of what they did sat in American archives, unheard. These are their stories.,,,  To sign up, Private Henry Churchill, (in the center), sold his lobster fishing licence and twice walked 19 kilometres from his hometown, Port Maitland, N.S., to the nearest recruiting office in Yarmouth. A paratrooper, he would drop into Normandy with 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion, ahead of the seaborne assault. Sapper Schaupmeyer was the third of the seven children of German immigrants farming near Edmonton. He and two brothers enlisted,,, >click to read<16:04

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 36′ Calvin Beal Lobster/Tuna, 350HP Volvo TAMD 73EDC

Specifications, information and 38 photos >click here< To see all the boats in this series, >click here<14:00

Always Top Quality! Your Seafreeze Ltd. Price Sheet for June 2019 Has Arrived!

Contact our sales team today @ 401 295 2585 or 800 732 273 To review the complete price list from Seafreeze Ltd., >Click here< – We are Direct to the Source – We are Fishermen – We are Seafreeze Ltd.! >Click here to visit our website www.seafreezeltd.com/<12:05

As ‘Jaws’ turns 44, here are 44 things you didn’t know about the original blockbuster

Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water… The movie, the story of a great white shark terrorising the shores of the fictional Amity Island, was plagued with production problems, but the ingenuity of Spielberg (just 27 at the time) and his crew in the face of adversity, made Jaws a masterclass in tension and the first summer blockbuster.,,, 5. Lee Marvin, Spielberg’s first choice for Quint, declined the role as he was on a sport fishing holiday He preferred that to making a “fishing movie”, so Robert Shaw got the part.,,, 11. Quint was partially based on local fisherman Craig Kingsbury, who taught Shaw how to speak like a whale-hunting sea captain. Some of Kingsbury’s dialogue ended up in the script, and he also played the ill-fated fisherman Ben Gardner, whose one-eyed head pops out of the >click to read<11:15

Chasing Demons: 75 Years On, D-Day Haunts, Drives Its Vets

They are back, some for the first time since war stole their innocence 75 years ago on Normandy’s D-Day beaches. They are back on battlefields where the World War II veterans saw friends killed, took lives themselves, were scarred physically and mentally and helped change the course of history. Given the painful memories, given their unfamiliarity with the country they liberated, given the difficulty of traveling abroad, why are Americans and veterans from other Allied nations in their 90s coming back for this week’s anniversary of the June 6, 1944, invasion of Normandy?,, Here, in their own words, >click to read< 17:45

Drink Up! 25 cups of coffee a day are as safe for your heart as 1 cup, new study says

Coffee lovers now have scientific evidence that it’s safe for your heart to have as much as 25 cups a day, according to a new study. Coffee fans have been getting mixed messages about their favorite drink for years, including previous studies that suggest coffee is bad for your heart.,,, But a new study from Queen Mary University of London and the British Heart Association says the opposite. The study found that drinking five or more cups a day was no worse for the arteries than drinking less than a cup; the study also found that even those who drink up to 25 cups a day >click to read<11:53

Nature Conservancy president resigns in wake of sexual harassment probe

Nature Conservancy President Brian McPeek resigned Friday, just days after the group completed an investigation into sexual harassment and workplace misconduct at the world’s largest environmental organization. The news came two days after POLITICO first reported on the internal investigation at the group, which reported $1.3 billion in revenues last year and has long drawn support from both Democrats and Republicans. Its board of directors includes former Republican Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist and former Obama administration Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, and its executives include former Obama White House climate adviser Heather Zichal. >click to read<11:06

NOAA is trying to encourage more observers to report sexual harassment

In the commercial fishing industry, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration workers, known as observers, jump onboard hundreds of vessels each year to make sure fishermen are following federal regulations, but many of the women who perform these duties say they experience sexual harassment. NOAA is trying to encourage more female observers to report those instances, even if they seem insignificant. >click to read<08:08

Twin Disc and its role in D-Day

June 6 marks the 75th anniversary of D-Day – a key event in World War II. Starting that day, wave after wave of Allied troops (approximately 156,000) invaded the Axis-held beaches of Normandy, France. A product made by Racine’s Twin Disc was there, too.,,Virtually every marine gear used by the Landing Craft Vehicle Personnel (LCVPs) that carried troops and equipment to the Normandy beaches was produced at Twin Disc’s manufacturing plant at 14th and Racine streets.,,, . Twin Disc first developed a clutch product for boats (marine gear) in the 1920s. By the late 1930s, this product was used in fishing boats and work boats. >click to read<19:15

Time to Pay Your Respects to the Plywood Boat that Helped Win WWII – The Higgins Boat, named after its inventor, Andrew Higgins, was designed to solve what was basically the “last mile” problem for a military invasion >Video, click to read<

North Pacific Fishery Management Council meeting June 3-10, 2019, in Sitka, Alaska.

The North Pacific Fishery Management Council will meet June 3-10, 2019, at the Harrigan Centennial Hall in Sitka, Alaska. The >Agenda, click< and >Schedule, click<as well as a list of review documents and their associated posting dates are available through the links provided. >Listen online, click< while the meeting is in session. 15:28

Louisiana – Flooding, pollution devastating state’s fishing industry

Even with the delayed opening of the Morganza Spillway, fishermen in Acadiana say they’ve been feeling the affects of flooding for months. Thursday, Governor John Bel Edwards said fishermen around the state are experiencing 90 percent loss. In Cypremont Point, commercial fisherman Thomas Olander says on a normal Friday during shrimp season the bay is filled with shrimp boats and shrimp for local shoppers.,, “With all of the runoff with fertilizer and all the towns that are being flooded now with fresh water running through the towns It’s just polluted and it’s causing one of the largest dead zones probably ever recorded,” he explained.  >Video, click to read<09:15

Winter skate are dying in huge numbers, a new scientific paper points the finger at a big herd of seals

A “striking conservation success” in Atlantic Canada has turned into a “serious conservation problem” as rebounding grey seal herds threaten depleted bottom-feeding fish in the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence, according to a new research paper from Canadian and U.S. scientists. The focus is on the winter skate, a little-known shark relative with a flat body and a long tail. “It’s quite dire. The skate have declined by 98 per cent since the mid-80s,” said Doug Swain, a federal fisheries scientist based in Moncton, N.B. The paper concludes grey seals are the likely cause of an “unprecedented” winter skate annual adult mortality rate of between 65 and 70 per cent. >click to read<09:20

OUT TO CATCH THE LAST FISH? Fisheries “expert’s” anti-fisherman rhetoric gets taken to task!

“…most fishermen always want to catch more fish, regardless of how many there are.” This quote from the fisheries “expert” in the article, Warming waters spark marine migration, fish wars >click to read<on the warming ocean, and Joel’s subsequent comment, “And here in lies the problem. Look at what this cubical entrenched pencil pushing empty suit thinks of fishermen. Folks like this need to be taken to task”, inspired a re-post of this anti-fishing propaganda article, OUT TO CATCH THE LAST FISH? It’s a few years old, but sadly, as current as ever!  To be a fisherman, these days, is to have first-hand knowledge of bias and mindless prejudice. Manipulating commercial fishing to save the stocks from “endangerment” and worse, has often been job justification for the political and personal agenda-driven, obsequious, career-climbing government fisheries “scientists” and managers. “Destructive” commercial fishing is also a handy foil for corporate style environmental groups’ fund raising efforts; and diminishing the importance of domestic commercial fishing is also a necessary step in the energy industry’s march into the sea. >click to read< Thank you, Dick.17:02

Fishery observer survey seeks answers for high turnover

Many of Alaska’s (and the nation’s) commercial fisheries depend on observers having a place on board, but fewer than a fifth of them feel appreciated by the industry, according to a new survey. Fishery observers sail on vessels with fishermen in federal waters and keep track of catch and bycatch and take biological samples throughout trips. Managers use this information to evaluate stocks and manage fisheries. The job can be tough, requiring up to a month at a time on the water in rough conditions, and turnover can be high. The survey, conducted by the National Marine Fishery Service in 2016, asked 553 observers why they did the job and what their experiences have been like. >click to read<16:13

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 45′ Guilmond Lobster Boat, 6 Cylinder Cummins

Specifications, information and 14 photos >click here< To see all the boats in this series, >click here<12:11

How to wreck an industry – Catch shares lead to consolidation of Alaskan fisheries

A recent study documenting consolidation and specialization in Alaska’s fisheries over the past three decades illustrates a broader trend taking hold in coastal communities across the country. Catch share programs, a new fisheries management system, are turning fishing rights into tradable commodities, driving up the cost to fish and consolidating fishing rights into the hands of a few wealthy owners. For instance, in Alaska’s Bering Sea crab fishery, just four companies own 77 percent of the rights to fish a single crab species. >click to read<11:30

R.I. teenagers survived hell on Earth in D-Day invasion

There aren’t many of them left, and here were two of the last — American soldiers who landed on D-Day. Seventy-five years ago. Ernie Corvese is 93 and Richard Fazzio 94, both among the first to come ashore into German fire on June 6, 1944. They are elderly now, but giants, too — men who stopped tyranny, pushed it back across Europe and killed it. I met them in Wakefield, Rhode Island, in a new museum called the Global Education Center, part of the World War II Foundation created by documentarian Tim Gray, who has put both Corvese and Fazzio in D-Day movies. >Video, click to read< Thank you, Gentlemen, and the Greatest Generation. 20:02