Category Archives: International News

Scare-mongering Big Brother on America’s fishing boats hurts those who know the industry best

The plague on the commercial fishing industry isn’t “overfishing,” as environmental extremists and government officials claim. The real threats to Northeastern groundfishermen are self-perpetuating bureaucrats, armed with outdated junk science, who’ve manufactured a crisis that endangers a way of life older than the colonies themselves. Hardworking crews and captains have the deepest stake in responsible fisheries management — it’s their past, present, and future — but federal paper-pushers monitor them ruthlessly like registered sex offenders. >click here to read<09:47

Don Cuddy: Local crab fisherman finds a niche market with slime eels

Slime eel, it’s what’s for dinner.  Well perhaps not on menus around here but in South Korea ‘ggomjangeo’ is extremely popular and, barbecued, is sold on the street like hot dogs. With scant recognition a fishery for these scavenging bottom dwellers has been prosecuted in New England for the past 40 years. Hagfish, as they are also known, are primitive deep-sea creatures and reputedly the only living creature with a skull but no vertebrae, although, given recent events, there may be some elected officials who could potentially rival that claim. Atlantic Red Crab company founder Jon Williams has been fishing these eels since 1999.,, >click here to read< 20:02 

Missing fishermen feared dead ‘wouldn’t last more than five minutes’ in freezing Loch Fyne, says uncle

The search for Duncan MacDougall, 46, and Przemek Krawczykis in the Argyll waters is now a recovery operation despite a heroic attempt to save them. The pair became trapped when the 40ft Nancy Glen overturned – with pal John Miller, 34, being rescued by a passing vessel. Duncan’s uncle, Thomas Aitchison, 62, says his family are struggling to cope but have to assume the pair are dead due to the amount of time they would have been in the water. >click here to read<13:56

Letter: Stop digging a graveyard for our fisheries

Our fishing industry in Newfoundland and Labrador is in shambles, and yet politicians and decision-makers are blind to the fish bones pilling up in the graveyard, and with it, our prime industry, economy and our communities. Either that, or they simply do not care or have a handle on this industry they are responsible for managing and growing. Are they aware or concerned about the rapid expansion of the Canadian factory freezer trawler operations off our coasts while our groundfishery recovery is stalled and shrimp and crab fisheries in decline? >click here to read< 11:05

Loch Fyne search for missing fishermen scaled back

A major search for two fishermen missing after their boat capsized in Loch Fyne in Argyll and Bute has been scaled back. The alarm was raised by a third man who was pulled from the water by the crew of a passing boat on Thursday evening. Despite efforts of those on scene to keep it afloat, the 40ft Nancy Glenn TT100 fishing vessel sank. Lifeboats, a coastguard helicopter and rescue teams, as well as local boats, have been searching for the men. The operation has now been scaled back and further efforts will resume in the morning. >click here to read< 13:09

Science Pushed to Back Burner, as Swiss Outlaw Live Lobster Boiling

Some find it strange, while others, simply fascinating. And others still put it on their dinner menu because they’re drawn to its preparation in a macabre sort of way. But the government of Switzerland believes the practice of throwing a live lobster in a pot of boiling water is unnecessary, and most of all, cruel.,, And this heartfelt legislative decision – presumably not on humanitarian, but lobsterian, grounds – was made Jan. 10. In short, the Swiss simply feared that these tasty, sea creatures experienced agonizing pain during those final, heated moments of their lives. There’s only one problem with that: it’s impossible, since there’s no scientific evidence to support the position. >click here to read< 10:09

Dutch trawlers may face pulse fishing ban as EU parliament says no

The European parliament on Tuesday voted in favour of a ban on pulse fishing, a decision which it will use in negotiations with the European Commission and which will have a major impact on the Dutch fishing industry, if implemented. Opponents of the system say it is a cruel and unnecessary method of fishing. It involves sending a current of electricity through sections of the sea bed, partially stunning sole and plaice and forcing some into the net. >click here to read< 16:49

Super-Sjark seine netter for Lofoten

Rolf-Inge Johansen ordered the new vessel from Sletta Verft, having sold his previous 1977-built, 38 metre Hellodden in 2016 to a Spanish company to fish off western Africa. Its replacement is a compact 14.90 metre LOA by 6.50 metre beam seine netter of the same name. The new Hellodden follows the current trend in Norway for compact fishing vessels under 15 metres, with a large beam and plenty of height, providing a fishing platform that would previously have only been possible with a considerably larger vessel. >click here to read< 11:11

EU Trawlers Step Up ‘Pulse’ Fishing Efforts, Devastating British Fisheries Ahead of Brexit

European Union trawlers have been stepping up illegal ‘pulse fishing’ in British waters under a special EU derogation, inflicting “total devastation” on the North Sea.  The controversial method of sees fishing vessels — mostly Dutch trawlers — drag electrodes across the seabed to zap sole and plaice off the floor. It is officially banned, but the European Commission — which controls the fisheries of EU member-states through the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) — granted a special derogation for it to be carried out on an “experimental” basis in British fishing grounds in the North Sea. >Video, click here to read< 12:45

Riders of the storm: The Islanders keeping fish on the menu

Lobster fisherman Scott Samson is one of many who has been left perplexed and frustrated by the apparent lack of lobsters in Jersey’s waters. Earlier this week Don Thompson, the president of the Jersey Fishermen’s Association, said that rough seas and bad weather had led to the worst period of fishing for ‘12 to 15 years’.  Scott agrees, even going so far as to say that in the 20 years he has worked as a commercial fisherman, the past 12 months have been the toughest he has experienced.  >click here to read< 11:11

Tumby Bay business concerned for fish prices

A Tumby Bay business owner is concerned how pressure put on commercial fishers and the rising number of recreational fishers will affect fish prices going forward. Tumby Bay Takeaway owner Aaron Gates has concerns about how the state government’s commercial licence buy-back and the periodic closure of the Sir Joseph Banks Group to net fishing will affect commercial fishers and fish prices in the future. Late last year the government announced a $20-million voluntary buy-back scheme to remove 100 commercial net and longline licences. >click here to read< 10:25

Making demersal seines more precise

Demersal seines are so effective that the haul can become unmanageable. It has also been difficult to avoid bycatches when using them. Since 2013, fisheries researchers at the Institute of Marine Research have been working to redesign this fishing gear. One aim of the recently completed project was to find a way to separate species.   >Video, click here to read09:58

Queensland Fishers can expect ‘biggest changes industry has ever seen’

THE recreational and commercial fishing industries could be on the verge of some of “the largest changes in Queensland fishing”. Under State Government direction leaders in those industries joined environmentalists and government representatives for the first time last week to thrash out necessary changes to boost inshore fish stocks. Under State Government direction leaders in those industries joined environmentalists and government representatives for the first time last week to thrash out necessary changes to boost inshore fish stocks.  >click here to read< 18:51

The Squid That Sink to the Ocean’s Floor When They Die

While the lives of squid are mysterious in many ways, one gruesome truth is that after mating comes death. First the male dies. Next the female, after making a little pouch of eggs, begins to starve. “She is unable to feed because the egg mass is in front of the mouth,” explains Henk-Jan Hoving, a deep sea biologist at Geomar Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel, Germany. “She probably gets energy from the breakdown of her own tissue, either from the liver or the mental tissue. This is how she stays alive, basically.” Then, once the female is dead and the eggs have hatched, her body will often float to the ocean’s surface and get eaten by birds. >click here to read< 17:43

Government Takes Culinary Action, New Law Outrages As Animal Rights Activists Thrilled

If you’re a Pink Floyd fan, you know the song “Comfortably Numb.” The song has just become the anthem for lobsters in Switzerland. Why? Because the Swiss government has just passed a new animal protection rule banning the culinary art of tossing a live lobster into a boiling pot of water to cook it.,, Animal activists have been successful in urging Swiss officials to pass the law, which focuses on all kinds of animal cruelty, like illegal puppy farms and banning bark collars that send an electric shock to a dog’s neck when barking. >click here to read<17:30

Illex Squid: Falklands concern with vast fishing fleet gathering on high seas

A vast fleet of fishing vessels assembling to catch Illex squid on the high seas, some 400 miles north of the Falkland Islands, is an issue of concern to the Falkland Islands Fisheries Department. Director of Natural Resources John Barton confirmed to Penguin News this week that the fleet had been out there from an early date and was likely to be catching small squid as well as having the capacity to catch a great deal of squid. This could, of course, impact on Falklands fishery catches. >click here to read< 13:02

SouthCoast fishermen call NOAA’s civil action against Carlos Rafael ‘overkill’

New Bedford- Current and former area fishermen balked at NOAA’s reach in its civil action against Carlos Rafael. “It’s total overkill,” said Stephen Lozinak, captain of fishing vessel Marsheen Venture and who has been fishing for more than five decades. “The whole thing is overkill. All it’s doing is hurting the workers in the city of New Bedford.” >click here to read <21:01

Oceantech company offers benefits for lobster industry

When Premier Stephen McNeil toured the Volta Labs startup house in Halifax last month, one company that seemed to catch his eye was SeaSmart, a new oceantech company based in Mahone Bay. Led by CEO Mark Lowe, the SeaSmart team has developed “smart lobster traps” that contain sensors to tell whether lobsters have entered the trap. The system tells fishermen, while they are still on dry land, whether there is enough product in their traps to justify going out to sea to harvest them. >click here to read<23:00

Inside DFO’s Battle to Downplay a Deadly Farmed Salmon Disease

Part One of a series. Provincial lab played key role in denying existence of HSMI in BC. In 2002, Dr. Ian Keith, a senior DFO veterinarian, began noticing strange heart lesions when he examined Atlantic salmon from B.C.’s growing fish farm industry. Keith was likely the first to detect signs of Heart and Skeletal Muscle Inflammation. The disease, first found three years earlier in Norwegian farmed salmon, went on to plague the industry there, killing up to 20 per cent of salmon in some outbreaks. >click to read the story< 19:21

Part II: DFO’s Plan to Gut Rules Protecting Wild Salmon from Fish Farm Disease – Part two of a series. After court losses, federal government has new strategy to protect industry. >click here to read< 1/11/18 20:29

 

Lobsters must be comfortably numb before cooking: Swiss government

Switzerland has banned the common culinary practice of throwing fresh lobsters into boiling water as part of an overhaul of its animal protection rules. “Live crustaceans, including the lobster, may no longer be transported on ice or in ice water. Aquatic species must always be kept in their natural environment. Crustaceans must now be stunned before killing them,” say the rules adopted by the government on Wednesday that will take effect in March.  click here to read the story 10:22

Private Oceans: The enclosure and marketisation of the seas

Neoliberalism, the restructuring of global capitalism that has taken place since the 1970s, has made commercial fishing vastly more profitable for corporations and large boat owners. Fish and ordinary fishers have fared much worse. Our oceans face overfishing, habitat destruction, pollution and a biodiversity crisis driven by warming water linked to climate change, while government policies exclude thousands of ordinary people from commercial fishing. Private Oceans: The enclosure and marketisation of the seas, examines the effects of one of the main causes of this exclusion, Individual Transferable Quotas (ITQs), pioneered in the 1980s in New Zealand fisheries, and further developed in Iceland through the 1990’s and now an intrinsic part of the Common Fisheries Policies (CFP) of the European Union. click here to read the story 08:58

Potting for cod in a Marlborough Sounds marine reserve

A while back we talked to Tom, a ranger in Akaroa who was working with MPI and NIWA to survey the marine reserves on Banks Peninsula. The survey looked at blue cod numbers in the two marine reserves, with the study allowing DOC to look at the effect those reserves are having on the wider Banks Peninsula fishery.,,, As the boat reached its first stop, the expert skipper flicked on his depth sounder to locate the band of rocky reef and rubble around the island where the crew would lower the first pot. Video, click here to read the story 14:58

Jersey UK: Foul weather hurts fishing industry’s peak period

Don Thompson said that although the weather was beginning to improve, fishermen would now need to spend days sorting out tangled fishing gear left in the sea during the storms. The poor weather also affected freight ships, which were unable to dock in the Island on a number of occasions, leading to a shortage of fresh food in supermarkets.  Mr Thompson added: ‘I would say the guys have been able to get out about two days out of 20, some on only one [day] – it has been really severe. click here to read the story 12:56

Always Top Quality! Your Seafreeze Ltd. Preferred Price List for January 9th 2018 Has Arrived!

Contact our sales team today @ 401 295 2585 or 800 732 273 Click here for the complete price list from Seafreeze Ltd. – We are Direct to the Source-We are Fishermen-We are Seafreeze Ltd! Click here to visit our website!

Untouched salmon

The future of commercial salmon processing will go online in Norway later this year when the machines take over a plant just north of the Arctic Circle. If the operation proves successful – and there is every indication it will – Alaska should get ready to see yet another radical change in the labor-intensive business that helped shape the territory and fire the push for Statehood in the 1950s. click here to read the story 09:25

The NIMBY’s! Coast Guard suspends use of Beaumont Hospital landing site after resident complaints

The Coast Guard’s helicopter service has suspended the use of the designated landing site for Beaumont Hospital after complaints from local residents. For the last number of years, a football pitch close to the hospital has been used as a landing site by both the Coast Guard helicopter service and the Air Corps to deliver patients to Beaumont, which is the country’s national centre for neurosurgery. In a post on its Facebook page back in November, the Beaumont Woods Residents Association,,, click here to read the story 15:07

FISH-NL questions quiet reopening of Canadian ports to banned Faroese and Greenland trawlers

The Federation of Independent Sea Harvesters of Newfoundland and Labrador (FISH-NL) is calling on Ottawa to explain its decision almost a year ago to quietly reopen Canadian ports to trawlers from the Faroe Islands and Greenland that had been banned for overfishing northern shrimp. “Why exactly was the ban lifted, and why didn’t the federal government make the news public when the decision was made?” questions Ryan Cleary, President of FISH-NL. click here to read the press release 11:48

The Mystery of the Third Man

Allow me to set the scene. Location: The frigid and stormy Wendell Sea, close to the Antarctic continent. The year: 1915 Sir Ernest Shackleton and his crew are reaching their 400th day living in a makeshift camp on the ice while their now-abandoned ship Endurance is slowly crushed by sea ice. The crew described the groaning and creaking of the splintering ship as sounding like the death cries of something half-alive. By November of that year, the last of the ship finally sank beneath the waves, and Shackleton and his crew had no choice but attempt the harrowing journey in their recovered life boats to the barren, inhospitable shores of Elephant Island. click here to read the story 18:00

Don Cuddy: Sector closure angers and worries groundfish industry

It was on Monday, November 20, two days before his retirement party as NOAA regional administrator, that John Bullard abruptly ordered the shutdown of Sector IX’s groundfish operations. The boats out fishing had to return to port forthwith.,,, Bullard’s move was praised by some but it engendered some harsh criticism in the city. Click here to read the story. 23:11

Rife with regulations: 50-year fisherman sells over demands

AFTER half a century working at sea, Daniel Pope says the increase in regulations has forced him to retire from the fishing industry. The 67-year-old commercial fisherman has sold his prawn trawler to a Cairns buyer, and will step off the boat for the last time on January 17. Over the past 50 years, Mr Pope has witnessed the industry grow and evolve and said the increase in regulations was getting out of hand.  “I believe the fishery is the best I’ve seen it, or as good as I’ve seen it in 50 years,” he said.  click here to read the story 15:19