Category Archives: International News

Federal carbon tax could ‘degrade’ Canadian fishing industry’s competitiveness

The federal government’s carbon tax could take a toll on Canada’s fishing industry, causing its competitiveness to “degrade relative to other nations,” according to an analysis from the fisheries department.,, According to the analysis, the fishing sector would need to absorb annual fuel cost increases of 2.1 per cent, or $5.2 million, under a carbon price that increases by $10 per tonne annually to $50 per tonne in 2022. The commercial fishing sector would be hardest hit, it finds, as fuel costs account for more than nine per cent of production costs. >click to read<

Bottom trawling for orange roughy has scientists worried

Three of the nine fisheries within New Zealand waters were recently deemed sustainable once again. But it is bottom-trawling for orange roughy on the high seas – the area out beyond the 12 nautical mile limit of New Zealand and Australia’s exclusive economic zone – that has scientists and conservationists worried.,,  Experts call them “vulnerable marine eco-systems” (VMEs) but some in the fishing industry even object to the term as “unscientific and akin to labelling fishermen as murderers”. These tensions led to protracted wrangling about how best to protect the South Pacific’s orange roughy and that has now culminated in threats of legal action from New Zealand’s powerful fishing industry interests. >click to read<13:45

Gulf of St. Lawrence – 6 fishing areas closing after 2 right whales spotted

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans is temporarily closing several fishing areas in an effort to protect endangered right whales. In a tweet, Fisheries Minister Dominic LeBlanc said two North Atlantic right whales were spotted in the Gulf of St. Lawrence off the coast of New Brunswick. The closures will take effect May 22 at 4 p.m. ​and all gear is expected to be removed from the water by that time. The closures are for the following fisheries: snow crab, toad crab, rock crab, lobster and whelk. The closures will also apply to winter flounder and Atlantic halibut, except where gear is not left unattended. >click to read<07:25

The difference between Blue and Yellow (Fin Tuna)

From Humdrum to Gourmet: There was a time when eating tuna fish was not considered a gourmet experience. Canned tuna was a standard luncheon selection for school children and weekend casseroles. Demand for tuna was small: In 1950, the worldwide catch totaled 660,000 tons (approximately); today the desire has increased geometrically, and the world catch recently reached an excess of 7 million tons. From Trash to Treasure  In the 1970s, Bluefin tuna was considered trash fish. It was used in cat food and sport fishermen paid to have it hauled off their boats. In the mid-1990s the reputation for Bluefin tuna in Japan was so bad that it was referred to as neko-matagi, food too low for even a cat to eat. Today it is the most expensive fish in the sea. >click to read<09:34

If Renewables Are So Great for the Environment, Why Do They Keep Destroying It?

If solar and wind farms are needed to protect the natural environment, why do they so often destroy it? Consider that: New offshore wind turbines in Germany could “lead to the extinction of individual species” including the rare, intelligent, and highly-threatened harbor porpoise, according to Friends of the Earth-Germany (BUND). Migratory bat populations, including the hoary bat, could go extinct, say, scientists, if the expansion of wind energy in North America continues. A single California solar farm, Ivanpah, required the killing of hundreds of desert tortoises, the state’s threatened reptile, and annually kills six thousand birds by lighting them on fire. Wind turbines on California’s Altamont Pass killed an estimated 4,700 bird kills annually including Golden Eagles. “Some lose their wings,” says the Audubon Society, “others are decapitated, and still others are cut in half.” Come on, you might be thinking — aren’t these impacts trivial compared to other threats? After all, house cats kill between one and four billion birds per year in the U.S. >click to read<18:49

Rethinking the Ocean Factory Trawler

An entirely new design for the ocean factory trawler segment has been released by KNUD E. HANSENs Faroe Islands design team. From stem to stern this design redefines the classic trawler layout which has remained more or less unchanged for decades. The designers state: “The aim of this design is to set new standards for the next generation of ocean factory trawlers, seeking innovation in all solutions and adaption of new technologies to the long proven concept of stern trawlers”. >click to read<21:21

Canadian salmon firm admits using lobster-killing pesticide near Maine border

For the second time in five years, a Canadian salmon aquaculture firm has admitted in a New Brunswick courtroom to illegally using a pesticide known to kill lobsters for treating salmon off an island that abuts the Maine border. According to a CBC report, Northern Harvest Sea Farms admitted Tuesday to knowingly using the pesticide Salmosan 50 WP, without getting prior approval from the province, in an attempt to combat a sea lice outbreak at a salmon farm off Head Harbour on Campobello Island. Campobello Island is connected to the Maine town of Lubec via the Roosevelt International Bridge. >click to read<19:51

Tuna Industry Faces a Price-Fixing Scandal as Bumble Bee CEO Faces Criminal Charges

Price-fixing allegations have rocked the food world for the second time this year, as the CEO of Bumble Bee Foods is facing criminal charges for allegedly working to eliminate competition in the packaged seafood industry. Christopher Lischewski has been charged with one count of price fixing. That follows earlier similar charges against three StarKist tuna executives. One, who served as senior vice president for sales, pleaded guilty last year. Two other Bumble Bee executives have already pleaded guilty to price-fixing, and the company itself agreed to pay a $25 million fine for the same offense last year. >click to read<14:27

Fishing for solutions through legislation

The United States Congress is currently considering legislation that could affect the management of fisheries in the Northwest and directly impact local fishing. One of the bills being considered addresses the issue of sea lion predation on endangered stocks of salmon and steelhead. Another would effectively reverse a recent judge’s decision to increase spill at Columbia River and Snake River dams to improve downstream migration. There are also two bills that would amend the Magnuson-Stevens act, which regulates ocean fisheries. The Endangered Salmon and Fisheries Predation Prevention Act, or H.R. 2083, would amend the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972., H.R. 3144, H.R. 2023, H.R. 200 >click to read<09:00

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: Canadian Built 115ft. Steel Dragger, Seiner, Tuna, 830HP MTU 2000 Diesel

Specifications, information and 16 photos >click here< To see all the boats in this series, >Click here<13:18

MPAs – DFO will stifle lucrative industry by stuffing fishermen into new eco-box

I never thought I’d become a fisherman growing up. I always wanted something bigger. To make a real difference, you know —so after graduating top 10 in my class at Barrington Municipal High School, off to Acadia University I went, with no real direction, just thinking that there’s got to be something better than fishing out there. It took me three semesters, but I figured it out. There wasn’t.,, Our federal government has made some sort of an agreement on an international level to protect important habitat here off our coast. So I’m thinking, “Great, that’s super news, right? Fish forever, right?” >click to read<11:32

Pacific Salmon Treaty 3.0 looms for B.C. fishing industry

It has been nearly 20 years since a renegotiation of the Pacific Salmon Treaty with the U.S. sparked a war between the B.C. government, Ottawa and the U.S. That fight ended with Ottawa trying to expropriate a provincially owned seabed at Nanoose Bay – used for a joint Canadian-American submarine and torpedo test range – and generated such hostility that angry B.C. fishermen corralled an American ferry and held it hostage for two days in Prince Rupert in 1997.,,, The treaty expires at the end of this year. American and Canadian negotiators have been quietly working on its renewal for 18 months, said Brian Riddell, who is a Canadian commissioner to the Pacific Salmon Commission. >click to read<18:49

British fisherman, 21, is rescued by coastguard helicopter after being bitten by shark off coast of Cornwall

A young British fisherman has been airlifted to hospital with leg injuries after being bitten by a shark off the coast of Cornwall. The 21-year-old, named as Max Berryman, was bitten by the Porbeagle shark after it was hauled aboard a fishing boat yesterday morning. The crew of the Govenek of Ladram quickly sterilised and dressed his leg wound before asking HM Coastguard for medical assistance. The Coastguard search and rescue helicopter was then sent from Newquay to the 23m vessel, positioned about 120 miles from Land’s End. >click to read<13:17

Investor confidence shaken by surf clam controversy: Fisheries Council of Canada

The Fisheries Council of Canada says the Trudeau government’s decision to seize nearly $25 million in surf clam quota from one company and give it to another is causing investors to lose confidence in the industry. Council President Paul Lansbergen said governments have established and maintained a consistent model for applying licensing rules over the years, which has led to expectations of their consistent application — something that’s critical for businesses to make investment decisions. But in the wake of the controversial expropriation of an Arctic surf clam quota by Fisheries Minister Dominic LeBlanc, without any compensation, Lansbergen said “a clear lack of criteria and policy has created a climate of uncertainty and instability in fisheries management.” >click to read<17:23

Maryland’s Crab Country: Not Enough Visas, Not Enough Workers

Music blared as 21 Mexican women methodically cracked open steamed crabs piled high inside a cool, bright room. They picked out the meat and packed it into 1-pound containers that their employer, G.W. Hall & Sons, ships to wholesalers in the mid-Atlantic and as far away as Canada. A half-mile down Old House Point Road, the picking room at a competing company, Russell Hall Seafood, was silent, no workers to be seen. Bare metal tables, normally heaped with crabs this time of year, gleamed. The difference: one firm won the visa lottery, and the other lost. “It trickles all the way down the line,” said fisherman Burl Lewis, who normally sells a large amount of menhaden to Russell Hall Seafood but recently laid off a crew member from his 52-foot boat, the Trying Times. “The Mexican labor creates jobs for Americans. It’s creating my job.” >click to read<16:49

Why is it that so many prominent environmental campaigners turn out to be such scumbags, sleazebags, hypocrites or frauds?

The latest to be exposed is, of course, New York’s ex-Attorney General Eric Schneiderman. When Schneiderman wasn’t busy – allegedly – “choking, beating and threatening” women, he was busy bullying the people he calls “climate deniers”. Here he is on a video in 2014 declaring that “climate deniers have no place in public life.” Let me give you a few more examples: Al Gore and the Portland massage therapist (one of several victims, allegedly, of his tentacular groping…) Rajendra Pachauri, former head of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, exposed as a serial sex pest. David Suzuki – Canada’s most feted eco-campaigner who just happens to be a dick who is extremely rude and – see also Gore – an appalling hypocrite: >click to read<12:40

5 things to know about Canadian Tire’s new acquisition, Helly Hansen

Canadian Tire Corp. announced Thursday its plans to acquire Norwegian outdoor apparel brand Helly Hansen in a $985-million deal. Here are five things to know about the skier and sailor-focused clothing company: Sea Captain Helly Juell Hansen and his wife Margrethe launched the company in 1877 out of Moss, Norway after the captain discovered a better way to protect himself from Norwegian weather by applying linseed oil to cotton canvas, according to the company’s website. That trick resulted in supple, waterproof clothing and the duo started producing and selling jackets, trousers and other items made this way. >click to read<16:28

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 85′ Steel Scalloper/Longline/Shrimper, Cat 3412, Kort Nozzle

Specifications, information and 16 photos >click here< To see all the boats in this series, >Click here<12:28

Criminal investigation ordered into sinking of Nancy Glen

A criminal investigation is being held into the sinking of a fishing boat in which two men died. The Nancy Glen went down in Loch Fyne, near Tarbert, on January 18. Duncan MacDougall, 46, and Przemek Krawczyk, 38, who lived in the village, were on board when the trawler sank. It was confirmed yesterday that police have been asked to investigate. A Crown Office spokesman said: “The procurator fiscal has instructed Police Scotland to investigate the circumstances around the deaths of Duncan MacDougall and Przemek Krawczyk >click to read<

New Beam Trawler Delivered

Over the last 10 months, Damen Maaskant Shipyards Stellendam (Maaskant) has outfitted the 41-meter hull from stock. The vessel, designated UK 46, is for Hakvoort Brothers, based in Urk, the Netherlands. According to the builder, a key feature of the vessel is the installation of twin Optima nozzles manufactured by Damen Marine Components (DMC). This is the first time that Maaskant has installed these in a fishing boat. >click to read<12:49

‘Concern and confusion’: Premier slams logic behind marine protected area choices

Premier Stephen McNeil personally warned a federal panel on marine protected areas on Friday its decisions could have dire consequences for Nova Scotians who make their living from the North Atlantic Ocean. Banning fishing and other activities in protected areas has a huge impact on communities, particularly those along the province’s Eastern Shore, he told the National Advisory Panel on Marine Protected Area Standards in Moncton.,, “To date, we are not seeing decisions based on science, research or fact,” he told the group during his eight-minute prepared speech. >click to read<12:02

Offshore drilling on the edge of the Scotian Shelf too risky

BP’s lease sites take in the southeastern corner of the “Haddock Box” which is an important haddock spawning and nursery ground that is closed to fishing. The sites are about 50 km from our exceedingly beautiful and unique Sable Island National Park. The sites are also within a few kilometres of the Gully Marine Protected Area, which is home to rare deep-water corals and the endangered northern bottlenose whales. The Labrador current and the Nova Scotia current flow down the Scotian Shelf and the Scotian Slope to the southwest. These currents, combined with easterly prevailing winds at the lease sites, place the entire Scotian Shelf and all of our major fishing banks and lobster spawning grounds in jeopardy from any major spill.>click to read<09:08

Maine Men Sentenced for Illegally Trafficking American Eels

Today, William Sheldon was sentenced in federal district court in Portland, Maine, to six months in prison followed by three years supervised release for trafficking juvenile American eels, also called “elvers” or “glass eels,” in violation of the Lacey Act,, Sheldon was also ordered to pay a fine of $10,000, forfeit $33,200 in lieu of a truck he used during the crime, and may not possess a license to purchase or export elvers as a special condition of his supervised release. Also sentenced today for elver trafficking offenses was Timothy Lewis, who received a sentence of six months in prison followed by three years supervised release, with the special condition that he too may not possess a license to purchase or export elvers. Lewis was also ordered to pay a $2500 fine. Thomas Reno was also sentenced today to one year probation. >click to read<08:57

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Contact our sales team today @ 401 295 2585 or 800 732 273 >Click here< for the complete price list from Seafreeze Ltd. – We are Direct to the Source-We are Fishermen-We are Seafreeze Ltd! >Click here< to visit our website! 13:27

50-year-old Suffolk fishing boat found rusting in Tunisian harbour

Perhaps the last thing you would expect to see in a Tunisian harbour would be a link to the historic fishing industry of Lowestoft.,, While walking around the pretty harbour of the fishing port of Tabarka, a rusting, certainly not seaworthy ship appeared with the name ‘Marzak’ in white paint, on top of another name, the Suffolk Challenger., The fishing boat, built by Appledore Shipbuilders, worked out of the port of Lowestoft for decades, pulling in fish from as far as 300 miles off the coast of East Anglia. >click to read<11:21

Deegan Marine’s Stabicraft latest model of ‘unsinkable’ boat

Tucked away in the marine drive at Agfest is a first in Australia. Deegan Marine’s Stabicraft is the latest model of the well-respected brand of ‘unsinkable’ vessel.,,The Stabicraft will do 40 to 45 knots with a full load of gear and fuel, and is powered by two 250 horsepower Evinrude engines. The Stabicraft was first designed more than 20 years ago to meet the demand of commercial fishermen working the Foveaux Strait in southern New Zealand, a notoriously rough and dangerous stretch of sea. >click to read<09:17

New England Senators Threaten Trade Action Against Canada Over Right Whale Protections

A group of New England senators is calling on the U.S. government to speed up an analysis of Canada’s efforts to protect the endangered North American right whale, and to consider trade action if Canada’s rules do not prove as strong as in the U.S.,, Now they’re calling on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to investigate whether fishermen in Canada are being held to similar standards. If not, they say, then NOAA should consider barring the import of Canadian seafood from the relevant fisheries. “It’s really a double-edged sword,” says Patrice McCarron, executive director of the Maine Lobstermen’s Association. >click to read>19:12

Fisheries Act must include legal duty to rebuild stocks: Oceana Canada

For the first time since the Fisheries Act was created in 1868, there are provisions within it that focus on the rebuilding of fish stocks. But as they’re currently worded, they fall short of what international experience has shown is required to actually help a stock rebuild.  Simply, they must mandate that the federal government respond, not just consider responding. That was the word from Josh Laughren, executive director of Oceana Canada, at the House fisheries committee earlier today. He said the language contained in Bill C-68 will also have to go further if it’s going to fulfil Canada’s international agreements and ensure this country’s laws are commensurate with other nations. >click to read<16:06

Marine Monument Case Aligns Trump, Conservationists

Cautiously aligned with the government in support of America’s first marine monument, environmentalists urged a federal judge Monday to sink a challenge by fishing groups. Designated by President Barack Obama in September 2016, the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts Marine National Monument encompasses 4,913 square miles off the coast of New England. Cordoned off from oil and gas exploration, as well as commercial fishing, the seabed within the monuments boasts four underwater volcanoes and three canyons. The Natural Resources Defense Council, the Center for Biological Diversity, the Conservation Law Foundation and naturalist Zack Klyver had all intervened in the case,,, >click to read<14:08

Right whale rules trap fishermen

The federal government’s decision to extend rules protecting right whales to P.E.I.’s lobster fishermen sent waves of anxiety through the industry last week. The fishermen were reacting not only to the poor timing of the decision — coming just days before the lobster season’s opening on May 1 — but, more urgently, the prospect that their livelihood may dwindle if a right whale is spotted near a fishing vessel. Of course, the reasoning for these federal measures isn’t really at issue — no one is saying right whales shouldn’t be protected. >click to read<09:53