Category Archives: International News

Iceland is selling whole, raw lobsters – already shelled – for £15.

At this price, the lobsters, weighing about 140g, are considerably more expensive than the ones already in their shell that the likes of Aldi sell at Christmas for £6, or the pair of lobster tails that Asda sells for £12. But Iceland is confident that it will be a hit with British shoppers, many of whom see lobster as a key part of a Christmas buffet or meal. Sales of lobster jumped 32 per cent last year, helped by a price war which saw Lidl sell lobster for just £2.99 for a limited time in December. click here to read the story 09:35

Holy mackerel! Civilisation begins with fishing

Fishing, writes Fagan, ‘has created the modern world’. It is a startling claim, particularly given the wont of prehistorians to focus on hunting, gathering and then agriculture. Shellfish collectors, wrote one eminent prehistorian, ‘are normally associated with a low level of culture’. The people of Pinnacle Point on the South African coast who lived 165,000 years ago, collected molluscs to eat. More importantly, they used mollusc shells as adornment. This, says Fagan, ‘is the earliest known sign of the changes that result in today’s cognitive skills’. It is when humans began to be human. click here to read the story 09:10

Hawke’s Bay deckhand would probably have survived if he had been sober

A deckhand who drowned after falling overboard from a commercial fishing boat would probably have survived if he was sober, a coroner has found. Fisherman Kevin James Thomson died on December 7, 2013 after falling from Hawke’s Bay Seafoods vessel Jeanette near Napier Port. In a finding released on Friday coroner Carla na Nagara said Thomson had been under the influence of alcohol and drugs when he died and “it is most unlikely that Kevin would have fallen if he was sober and in the event he had fallen overboard sober he would have been in a position to take steps to save himself by staying afloat and calling for help”. click here to read the story 10:12

Report: Imported seafood often contains dangerous drugs

In 2015, about 90 percent of seafood consumed in the U.S. was imported from overseas, and about half of that comes from fish farms, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The recent analysis released by the U.S. General Accountability Office found that some fish imported from other countries, including China, India and Vietnam, contain high levels of drug residue, yet few samples are ever tested. click here to read the story 12:04

Scientists accused of scaremongering, ‘overheated claims’ with warning to humanity

A recent warning to humanity endorsed by thousands of scientists around the world includes “scaremongering” and “overheated” claims while ignoring much of the progress made in recent decades, some experts say. “It concerns me that the message from science is this doom-and-gloom scenario that just turns off about 75 per cent of people,” said Erle Ellis, an associate professor of geography and environmental systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. “There’s a small percentage that loves the crisis narrative, and they just repeat it over and over to each other.”​ click here to read the story 10:03

Iceland’s Forgotten Fisherwomen

In the mid-1700s, a seawoman in Iceland named Björg Einarsdóttir composed a poem teasing men on her boat for their weak rowing: Do row better my dear man, Fear not to hurt the ocean. Set your shoulders if you can Into harder motion. Her work at sea may seem unusual. After all, fishing is generally considered a man’s job. But recent work by an American researcher, Margaret Willson, suggests that Einarsdóttir was one of hundreds of Icelandic women in the 18th and 19th centuries who braved towering waves and icy waters to catch fish. click here to read the story 11:20

Lives on the line when fishermen head out to sea

It’s an old song. But it seems we have to keep singing it until something changes. Two weeks ago, The Globe and Mail ran a feature story on the fishing industry, pointing out, as others have for years, that the industry is one of the most dangerous in Canada. The newspaper mined statistical data to show just how dangerous the profession is: out of all professions in Canada, three different fishing occupations were in the top 10 of Canada’s most dangerous. Fishing vessel deckhand was the second-most dangerous occupation in the country. Fishing vessel skippers and fishers came in at fifth place, and aquaculture and marine harvest labourers ranked sixth. click here to read the story 09:06

Nations press panel to raise annual Bluefin tuna quotas

Nations fishing the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea have started assessing how much more prized Bluefin tuna can be caught in the next few years amid signs that stocks of the iconic fish are recovering. The 50-nation International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas opened its year-end meeting Tuesday in Marrakech, Morocco, facing pressure from nations to allow more Bluefin to be caught after years of cuts. click here to read the story 12:19

Marine Piping: It’s Not Rocket Science

The maritime industry, over time, has been unusually resistant to change in many aspects of how it operates. Arguably, the ‘biggest’ advances on the water spanning a five decade period leading up to the beginning of the new millennium could be measured in terms of deadweight tonnage and/or the length of a particular class of hulls. Nowhere is that reality more evident than in the shipyard, and looking at what equipment and hardware is used to build and repair marine vessels – now and in the past. Marine piping systems are a perfect example. click here to read the story 14:28

Door control from the wheelhouse

The idea of a pair of trawl doors that can be adjusted at the turn of a dial rather than by shifting attachment points and backstrops has been at the back of many people’s minds over the years – and there have been numerous experiments and trials carried out to get this to work. It has taken a while, and finally the first commercially-produced controllable pelagic trawl doors are available, produced by Esbjerg company MLD, an acronym that stands simply for Multi-Level Door.  click here to read the story    More images click here18:23

Big, new D&D fishing catamaran arrives home in Narooma

The town of Narooma came out in big numbers to greet the big new commercial fishing boat the D&D when it sailed through the bar crossing after its maiden voyage. The 25-metre, state-of-the-art, long-lining catamaran was built for the Abbott family of Narooma and will now be a unmissable fixture at the town wharf. The three siblings, Ryan, Todd and Hayley, still only in their 20s, commissioned the vessel to take their business the next step, to deliver the fresh seafood that they value add, selling it direct out of the factory, at markets and to restaurants. photo’s, click here to read the story 20:32

PHÚ YÊN – Typhoon Damrey wrecks lobster industry

A total of  89 people were killed, 1,140 fishing vessels either sunk or damaged and 24,000 aquaculture cages for lobsters, groupers and cobia were lost during Typhoon Damrey. More than 1,000ha of intensive shrimp growing fields and 570ha of molluscs were also damaged. Total losses suffered by the Khánh Hoà Province’s aquaculture sector is estimated at VNĐ 3.7 trillion (US$162.9 million) – the highest loss sustained by any sector. This accounted for 50 per cent of the province’s total storm losses. Typhoon Damrey also flooded thousands of hectares of land and destroyed the livelihoods of  lobster farmers in the south-central region. click here to read the story 11:41

The Codfather is Finally In Jail. But Who Is He?

Until his downfall this year, Carlos Rafael, the 65-year-old fishing magnate from New Bedford, Massachusetts owned 36 boats and controlled about one-fifth of the New England cod market. With a business allegedly worth upwards of $100 million, which included a processing facility and various distribution channels, Rafael was one of the biggest players in the North American fish market. ,,, “I hustled a lot of fisherman,” he once admitted. “But shame on them they did not know better.” ,,, “I am a pirate,” he once told a group of federal fisheries regulators. “It’s your job to catch me.” click here to read the story 23:01

Minister calls for clarity on post-Brexit fishing industry ahead of crunch talks

The UK Government is being urged to “come clean” on its plans for the fishing industry after Brexit as ministers prepare for “difficult” quota talks. Holyrood Rural Economy Secretary Fergus Ewing said all parties must work together in the run-up to crucial European fishing talks in December. He claimed uncertainty over what will happen when the UK leaves the European Union was being compounded by “confusion” from the UK Government over any transition period. The talks in Edinburgh on Friday, which also include representatives from the Welsh and Northern Irish administrations, are “an opportunity to show we are all fully focused on the needs and interests of our respective fishing industries,” he added. click here to read the story 18:32

‘My heart has been broken’: Sole survivor of trawler tragedy which left six fishermen dead breaks his silence

The sole survivor of the Queensland trawler tragedy which left six young fishermen dead has broken his silence in an emotional tribute to his late friends. Ruben McDornan, 32, was one of seven men aboard cucumber trawler Dianne when it capsized in treacherous seas off the town of Seventeen Seventy last month.  The bodies of Adam Hoffman and Ben Leahy were found in the sunken boat five days after the desperate search began. Four men, Adam Bidner, Chris Sammut, Eli Tonks and Zach Feeney, have not been found. click here to read the story 10:58

Labour to pause rollout of fish monitoring system

The fishing industry has got the pause it wanted to a system of electronic monitoring and reporting of fishing catches. Fisheries Minister Stuart Nash has instructed Ministry for Primary Industries officials to look at options for slowing down the implementation of IEMRS (Integrated Electronic Monitoring and Reporting System) on commercial fishing vessels.,, All commercial fishers were going to be required to use Geospatial Position Reporting and e-logbooks by April 1, 2018, and cameras by October 1, 2018. click here to read the story 09:01

Rarely seen ‘living fossil’ frilled shark caught off Algarve coast

A frilled shark, a species that is often termed a ‘living fossil’ because of several ‘primitive’ features that have survived for millions of years, has been captured off the coast of Portugal’s Algarve region, the country’s meteorological and sea institute has announced. Researchers from IPMA and the Centre for Maritime Sciences recorded the catching of a shark “with unusual features” by a commercial trawler, as part of an “initiative to minimise undesirable catches in European fisheries”. click here to read the story 22:43

Gold Coast prawn prices ‘highest in 35 years’ ahead of Christmas according to seafood shops

Seafood lovers have been told to brace for an expensive festive season with Gold Coast prawn prices already at a 35-year high at some retailers. The price of large king prawns, at $40 a kilogram, are already at Christmas peak levels.“I’ve never seen prices this high at this time of year,” said Tasman Star Seafoods co-owner Peter Duncombe. The price hike has been blamed on major reforms in the NSW commercial fishing industry have resulted in fewer prawn boats out on the water, a “fizzer” start to the season for trawlers, and a fallout from the devastating white spot disease which shut down Gold Coast prawn farms this year. click here to read the story 15:45

Occupational Hazard Or Social Factors? Tradesmen Five Times More Likely To Die By Overdose

Addiction to heroin and other opiates reaches across all socioeconomic boundaries, but a new study claims that young men in the building trades on Cape Cod are five times more likely than others to overdose and die.The findings, presented in a study by the Barnstable County Department of Human Services issued last month, ultimately raises as many questions as it answers. Researchers don’t know why, for instance, some people who enter the workforce directly from high school appear to be at greater risk of fatal overdoses than people who have attained higher education.,, The lobsterman who was interviewed indicated that he does not use drugs, but said he knows several commercial fishermen who died in overdoses. click here to read the story 14:18

Land Based vs Open Pen Aquaculture – Fish out of ocean water dampen aquaculture enterprise

Some day, it might be possible to raise salmon in land-based closed containment ponds and make a profit. But that day is still a long way off, and even when it does become economically viable, land-based aquaculture might be like organic farming: an option for consumers willing to pay a premium, but which can’t replace ocean-based salmon farming. That’s not just the conclusion reached by the BC Salmon Farmers Association (BCSFA), it’s also the opinion of a Nanaimo businessman who owns a land-based fish farm. click here to read the story 12:39

How Fishing Created Civilization

Of the three ancient ways of obtaining food—hunting, plant foraging, and fishing—only the last remained important after the development of agriculture and livestock raising in Southwest Asia some 12,000 years ago. Yet ancient fisher folk and their communities have almost entirely escaped scholarly study. Why? Such communities held their knowledge close to their chests and seldom gave birth to powerful monarchs or divine rulers. And they conveyed knowledge from one generation to the next by word of mouth, not writing. click here to read the story 10:02

Atlantic bluefin tuna stocks are rebounding — but raising quota proves controversial

Fishermen up and down the New England coast say it has been decades since they’ve been able to catch so many Atlantic bluefin tuna, so fast. Once severely depleted, populations of the prized sushi fish appear to be rebuilding. Now the industry and some scientists say the international commission that regulates the fish can allow a much bigger catch. But some environmental groups disagree.,, click here to read the story 09:18

Millions of fire extinguishers recalled

Kidde, a manufacturer of fire suppression equipment, has recalled more than 40 million fire extinguishers equipped with plastic handles. Some of the units were manufactured more than 40 years ago. According to the federal Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), “The fire extinguishers can become clogged or require excessive force to discharge and can fail to activate during a fire emergency. In addition, the nozzle can detach with enough force to pose an impact hazard.” Millions of Kidde fire extinguishers are currently installed on pleasure and commercial fishing boats. click here to read the story  Product Safety Recall – This product recall involves two styles of Kidde disposable fire extinguishers click here   08:22

Senior NOAA appointee calls for retraction of paper on illegal fishing

A top US official at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, who was recently appointed by President Donald Trump, has called for the retraction of a paper that suggests the country exports a significant amount of illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing. The paper, published July 6 in Marine Policy, estimated that in 2015 approximately one-fifth of Alaska pollock exports to Japan were either illegal, unreported, or unregulated — a value of as much as $75 million. click here to read the story 15:17

Is frozen cod just as good as fresh? Yes. As long as it is handled properly, new research reveals.

In Norway they say that nothing is in more of a hurry than a dead fish. This is probably true, because on average it takes three days for a fresh cod to reach most sales counters. And for both retailers and customers, a three-day-old fresh fish is stretching it a bit. However, if the fish is frozen on board the vessel and thawed properly before it reaches the sales counter, its quality can be just as good as if it had never seen the inside of a freezer. Just as long as the fishermen and fisheries industry take note of our research results. From fresh seasonal fish to a high-quality frozen product. click here to read the story 12:55

In Depth: Rose de Cascia

One could easily think that the ‘Ship of the Year award 2017’ for the innovative fishing vessel MDV-1, won together with shipyard Hoekman from Urk, seems to have paid dividend for shipyard Padmos from Stellendam. The yard is constructing a series of three fishing vessels for a French client which bear a strong resemblance to MDV-1, even though they are a size smaller.,, The Rose de Cascia and her sister vessels are specifically developed for the flyshooting fishing method, also called Danish Seine fishing or Snurrevaed. This method has gained in popularity as it is a lot more fuel-efficient than bottom trawling, whereby a heavy net is dragged over the seabed. click here to read the story 11:32

Eating Fish During Pregnancy Might Prevent Childhood Asthma

Consuming an actual fish by the mother as compared to fish oil could actually be beneficial in protecting the offspring from asthma. The research was the work of the researchers at the University of South Florida in Tampa, Fla wherein they conducted a scientific review of two studies that show that children whose mothers who consume  high-dose omega-3 fatty acids daily during their third trimester have lesser chances of having breathing problems. click here to read the story 11:16

‘Cover-up’ claim over ban on fish farm pesticide

The Scottish Government put pressure on its environmental watchdog to drop a plan to ban a toxic pesticide in 2018 so as not to upset the fish farming industry. Emails released by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (Sepa) reveal that senior government officials intervened directly to delete any mention of the proposed 2018 ban from a policy briefing for the environment minister, Roseanna Cunningham, following a complaint from the industry. The pesticide, known as emamectin and marketed as Slice, is widely used by fish farmers to kill the lice that plague caged salmon. But new scientific evidence suggests it is also causing widespread damage to wildlife in Scotland’s sea lochs. click here to read the story 09:10

Falklands calamari prices recover significantly as second season catch is below market expectations

Recent reports in trade journals that abundant catches during 2017 were depressing Falkland Islands loligo prices were challenged this week by local sources concerned with the fishing industry. The Falkland Islands Director of Natural Resources, John Barton, described 2017 as “a good calamari year” despite the “unusual and surprising” challenge of dealing with sea lion mortalities during the second loligo season. Some 24,000 metric tons were caught during that season. click here to read the story 22:33

Middlemen cause retail fish price to soar

The soaring retail prices of fish can be attributed to the multiple middlemen involved, as the catch exchanges hands from the trawlers before it reaches the Goan homes. Although the authorities are trying hard to control the prices, all such efforts are going in vain due to the alleged nexus between the middlemen traders and fishermen groups, it is learnt.Both the consumers and producers gain immensely from the role of middlemen, who ensure that there is a seamless flow of fish supply in the market by matching supply and demand. Regardless of the important role they play, there are some disadvantages to having intermediaries in the distribution channel. click here to read the story 13:32