Monthly Archives: September 2019

North Carolina: Upon further exploration of the matter, Spanish Mackerel fishery to reopen!

On September 10, 2019, I wrote you denying your request to have DMF issue a proclamation,,, Upon further exploration of the matter,,, Secretary Regan letter about Spanish Mackerel, Attached please find a letter from Secretary Michael Regan to Glenn Skinner concerning the Spanish Mackerel fishery. Mackerel harvest will reopen with a 500 pound daily trip limit sometime next week! Please stop calling Secretary Regan, Director Murphey and DMF staff on this issue, with thanks to those who took the time to call., >click to read < 22:45

Crab fishermen fined, protest against crab fishing policy proves costly

Five Northern Peninsula crab fishermen have received their sentencing after being found guilty of charges relating to a 2017 incident off of Port au Choix. In provincial court in Port au Choix on Sept. 19, the five men were ordered to pay various fines, totaling $16,000.,,, The charges stemmed from an incident on May 8, 2017, when the five Area 4R crab harvesters took their boats off the shores of Port au Choix and laid down their pots in Area 13 — where they were not permitted to do so. >click to read<  21:42

Monterey fish pump being torn down at commercial wharf

An industrial symbol of the heyday of commercial fishing in Monterey is being torn down this coming week after a conflict with the city resulted in a four-generation fishing family losing the lease on its wholesale processing warehouse on Monterey Municipal Wharf No. 2. A huge fish pump — not that anyone can particularly tell that’s what it is — can easily be seen from Del Monte Avenue straddling the truck ramps between the edge of the dock and the Royal Seafoods warehouse on the commercial wharf.,,, Once the pump is dismantled Pennisi said he will store it on his horse ranch until he decides what to do with it. As for Royal Seafoods, that business no longer exists, Pennisi said.  >click to read< 21:18

North Carolina Fisheries Association Weekly Update for Sept 20 , 2019

Legislative updates, Bill updates, Calendar, >Click here to read the Weekly Update<, to read all the updates >click here<, for older updates listed as NCFA >click here< 19:27

Oregon researchers investigate latest marine heatwave that could hurt Pacific ecosystems

Earlier this month, the feds announced there was trouble brewing in the Pacific: a mass of warm water was building off the west coast, reminiscent of another event nicknamed “The Blob,” which caused havoc for wildlife and fishermen just a few years ago. Experts caution that the current marine heatwave is still in its infancy and could dissipate today, tomorrow or next week.,,, “This marine heatwave took shape in June, persisted, and has grown in size,” said Chris Harvey, a research biologist at the Northwest Fishery Science Center, >click to read< 17:54

The 23rd annual Choptank Heritage Skipjack race set for Sept. 21

The 23rd annual Choptank Heritage Skipjack Race will be held on the Choptank River in Cambridge at 9 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 21. This event, which is hosted by the Dorchester Skipjack Committee, will include a parade of boats and the race.,,, This year, in addition to 8 to 12 skipjacks, several buyboats will be in attendance.,,, The race starts at 10 a.m. after the parade, and generally takes about an hour and a half to two hours to complete. The event is free. >click to read<  16:17

Panel Of Third Graders To Dictate Nation’s Climate Change Policy

At a panel on climate change held yesterday, the Senate brought in a group of excited third graders for ideas on fighting climate change. “These kids have ideas and they are passionate, so we must listen to them,” said Sen. Brian Schatz of Hawaii. “There are no possible downsides to taking kids who have been told the world is ending by the public school system and allowing them to dictate national policies on important issues.” The kids came up with the following list so far, though they say they’re “just spitballing” and the ideas need some fleshing out,, >click to read<

Pebble project permit application changes spark outrage

A decision by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to consider without additional public input recent changes in a Clean Water Act Section 404 permit application for the proposed Pebble mine in Southwest Alaska is sparking controversy anew Word spread after the USACE affirmed during a Sept. 17 media teleconference that there would be no additional public comment taken on 10 changes the Pebble Limited Partnership made to that application via a memo to the Corps. >click to read<  12:41

Hurricane Dorian ‘Totally Destroys’ 80% Of Fishing Industry

Fishermen yesterday said Hurricane Dorian had “totally destroyed” 80 percent of the industry in Abaco and Grand Bahama amid uncertainty over how the government will aid recovery. “Eighty percent of the fisheries sector in Grand Bahama and Abaco is totally destroyed. We’re not sure what the government will do to help us after Dorian,” said Keith Carroll, the Bahamas Commercial Fishers Alliance’s (BCFA) vice-chairman. >click to read< 10:38

Northern Pulp opponents question how province can be ‘lender, regulator and judge and jury’

With the province’s two highest courts questioning Gordon Wilson’s ability to make an unbiased decision on Northern Pulp’s effluent treatment plant, the Department of Environment offered up a two-sentence written response on Thursday.,,, Meanwhile, those opposed to Northern Pulp’s controversial plan to pump effluent into the Northumberland Strait are planning further court action,,, “I would think there are lawyers looking at injunctions right now,” hinted Allan McCarthy, a Caribou fisherman and one of the leaders of the opposition to Northern Pulp’s proposal. >click to read<  09:29

On This Day: September 20,1938 The ‘wind that shook the world’ kills 700, and nobody saw it coming

The hurricane of 1938 has been called, “the wind that shook the world”. In 1938 the U.S. Weather Bureau wasn’t what it is today . Meteorologists depended on the merchant ships and aircraft to forecast the weather. At 2:15 on Wednesday, September 21 1938 a Long Island fisherman saw what he thought was a huge fog bank, then, he realized it wasn’t fog. It was a churning wall of water 50 feet high bearing down on the New England coast and thirteen million unsuspecting people, with 200 miles per hour winds. >click to read< 07:44

Shrimp boat captain jailed for damaging another boat fishing ‘in his spot

The Sheriff’s Office sent marine units to an area of the Rigolets Pass near Geoghegan Canal to respond to a call about an altercation between the occupants of two shrimp boats, according to a news release. Casey Russell, 35, became angry when he spotted someone else shrimping “in his spot,” the Sheriff’s Office release said. >click to read<  18:40

Police called as FISH-NL execs crash FFAW meeting in Baie Verte – Cleary and Leonard physically forced out

The president of an upstart fisheries union says he didn’t barge in on an meeting in search of a confrontation with the union that represents the province’s in-shore harvesters, but a confrontation is what he got.,,, What ensued was momentary, aggressive chaos, as Cleary shouted “I tell the truth” and “we want a debate,” amid other people yelling and swearing, before meeting attendees physically forced him and Leonard from the room. The RCMP were also called to the incident. >click to read<  16:37

Three Charged with Violating Laws Intended to Protect Rebuilding Atlantic Herring Stock

The investigation, which took place during August and September, found that the fishing vessel Western Sea, operated by Glenn Robbins, exceeded the 160,000-pound weekly limit on two occasions. “At a time when regulators have drastically reduced harvest limits to address declining Atlantic herring recruitment, this is an especially egregious violation.”, said Marine Patrol Colonel Jay Carroll.,,, Ethan Chase, 42 of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, who also operated Robbins’ vessel, was cited,,, Dealer Dustin Reed, owner of wholesale seafood dealer New Moon Fisheries, has also been charged,,, >click to read< 14:58

Two Mainers, N.H. man cited in landing of too many herring>click to read<

Feds seek expanded habitat protection as salmon, orcas battle climate change, habitat degradation

Advocates for the designation say it provides another layer of review and more legal protection for the whales. “We are thrilled,” said Steve Jones, spokesman for the Center for Biological Diversity,,, However, Lynne Barre, head of killer-whale protection for NOAA, said she did not anticipate big changes if the designation is approved after a public comment period, because activities such as dam operations and fishing already are subject to review by the agency for their effect on endangered species. >click to read<  13:32

Leo White: Comparing open-net to recirculatory fish farming

In his letter, Cyr Couturier claims that open-net pen (ONP) aquaculture is alive and well in Newfoundland and Labrador and everywhere else. Nothing could be further from the truth.,,, In Norway, the birthplace of ONP technology, it is not possible to even get a licence to establish a new salmon aquaculture farm.,,,licences for Recirculatory Aquaculture Systems (RAS), which are land-based, are free. Clearly in Norway RAS is seen as the future for farming Atlantic salmon. Meanwhile in N.L., access fees are negligible and salmon farmers pay nothing for the incredible damage and pollution they create. >click to read<  11:36

Preliminary summary gives Bristol Bay highest exvessel value ever

After reviewing preliminary data from the season, Alaska Department of Fish & Game says that 2019 appears to be have produced the highest exvessel value of all time at $306.5 million. That means the money paid to boat captains as they unloaded their catches at dock was the highest ever, though the numbers don’t include adjustments for icing, bleeding, or production bonuses. The ADF&G summary also shows that the sockeye fun of 56.5 million >click to read<  10:46

Don’t Call Me Lobster

After a long, dull day, the sun is finally breaking through the clouds as fisherman Graeme Hackworth hops off his tiny blue-and-white boat—named Freya after his granddaughter—and clambers up the stone quayside. Using a heavy rope, he hoists the first of three plastic baskets, each about the size of a large laundry tote, from the boat deck about five meters below.,,,  Never knowing how much he’ll catch is exactly what he likes about his job. “It’s different every day,” he explains. “It’s the excitement.”,,, >click to read<  08:57

New Adenia readies for sea after trip via Killybegs

The new Adenia tackled some harsh weather on her passage from Astilleros Zamakona’s yard in Pasaia, first to Killybegs to pick up gear, and thence to Whalsay. Skipper George Anderson, who is in partnership with his sons Stuart, Josie and Michael and fishing agents LHD, said that Adenia took the side-on bad weather, blowing to 30 knots on the first leg and 40 on the second, in her stride. photo’s, >click to read<  07:52

Bristol Bay Native Corporation to acquire two giants of Alaska’s Pacific cod fishery

Clipper Seafoods and Blue North Fisheries are freezer longline catchers, two giants of the Pacific cod industry. Clipper has six hook and line vessels, and after retiring one of its vessels, Blue North will have four. Now, the Bristol Bay Native Corporation is poised to acquire all of them. “Blue North and Clipper Seafoods, as of Friday last week, have officially merged together. And then BBNC’s intentions are to acquire the merged companies – the Blue North Clipper Group – on Sept. 30.” Audio,  >click to read< 18:20

How much fishing gear is lost at sea, worldwide?

The first ever estimate of commercial fishing gear lost in the world’s oceans has been published by CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency. Abandoned, lost or otherwise discarded fishing gear or ‘ghost gear’,,, Until now there has not been a clear global picture of the quantity and type of fishing gear lost worldwide.,,Using data from 68 studies Currently, much of the data on gear loss is from the United States and Europe, highlighting the need for more information about gear losses in the African, Asian, South American and Oceania regions. >click to read<  16:27

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 44’11”x21 Novi Lobster/Scalloper, Price reduced

Specifications, information and 45 photos >click here< To see all the boats in this series, >click here<

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Five processors have monopoly on inshore fishery: FFAW-Unifor

Fish harvesters gathered in St. John’s Tuesday to speak out against what their union describes as the cartel-like behaviour of the province’s fish processing companies. FFAW-Unifor union says that, as a result of what it claims are co-ordinated efforts by some of the largest companies, who refused to buy species such as northern cod and squid for several weeks this season, harvesters are calling on the provincial government to issue new processing licences and develop a strategy to attract more competition and investment within the industry.  >click to read< 12:56

ACR Electronics Launches SM-3 Automatic Buoy Marker Light

ACR Electronics is introducing its new SM-3 Automatic Buoy Marker Light, a high-intensity LED strobe that provides brighter light in all directions for clear marking of a man-overboard site. Featuring industry-leading light weight, compact size and durability, the SM-3 provides 360° visibility for approximately 2 miles (3.22 km) and is ideal for any global commercial and leisure users requiring a reliable Crew Overboard (COB) marker light. When thrown in the water, the new ACR light automatically activates and rights itself to float upright in all conditions, strobing for over 24 hours,,, >click to read< 12:08

New study addresses changes in lobster molt timing, Gulf of Maine temperature shifts

Variation in lobster molt timing has been increasing in recent years, and is related to changing ocean temperatures in the Gulf of Maine,,, Creating a time series for lobster molts and outlining the relationship of the initial intra-annual molt season to bottom water temperatures in the Gulf of Maine is important to the lobster industry because shifts in water temperature could result in changes in timing of the molt season, led by then UMaine graduate student Kevin Staples, who was pursuing a dual master’s degree in marine biology and marine policy. >click to read< 09:45

9 U.S. environmental groups seeking Canadian snow crab import ban, stronger right whale protections

“We do believe that, at this point, at least Canadian snow crab needs to be banned from the United States,” said Sarah Uhlemann, program director of the Seattle-based Center for Biological Diversity. Uhlemann was one of nine conservation groups who signed a letter sent Tuesday to the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) urging it to “press the Canadian government to immediately strengthen right whale protections, in order to avoid an import ban and to help save the species from extinction.”  >click to read< 07:35

Coast Guard rescues 6 fishermen and an observer from a fishing vessel on fire off Oahu

Six crew and an NOAA observer are safe following a Coast Guard rescue eight miles off Ko’Olina, Tuesday. A Coast Guard Station Honolulu 45-foot Response-Boat Medium crew rescued the crew of the fishing vessel Miss Emma from a liferaft after the ship reportedly caught fire. Coast Guard Sector Honolulu Watchstanders received a mayday call on VHF-FM channel 16 at 4:29 p.m. reporting the crew was battling a vessel fire. Photo’s, >click to read< 06:56

We need a seal cull

There are over seven million harp seals that are devastating our marine life with each passing migration from the north, destroying valuable fish stocks and causing incalculable economic damage to the fishery and our province. The federal government has allowed this to go on for decades, and each successive government refuses to take any action on the exploding seal populations. We are now seeing the results of their inaction. Shrimp, crab, and cod stocks are disappearing at an alarming rate, while seals are never considered enough of a contributing factor. The government continues to set tokenized quotas that go unfilled. by Zack Best, >click to read<  18:48   We know our fishery and our waters. It’s time to protect them.

October is National Seafood Month & Aragosta Mama wants to challenge you.

Harpswell, Maine— September 17, 2019 — October is National Seafood Month. The origin for the designation is unknown but nevertheless it should be celebrated and promoted, especially so here in Maine. Aragosta Mama was created by Monique Coombs (author) who wants more people to understand and love the community and culture that is inspired by the commercial fishing industry. Commercial fishing is important to coastal communities around the country and provides innumerable jobs and healthy seafood to feed a fast-growing population. >click to read< 17:00

Floodwaters Diverted from New Orleans Killed Off Marine Life

The federal government’s effort to avoid a flood disaster in New Orleans had catastrophic consequences of its own, causing massive fish kills and habitat destruction along the Gulf Coast, according to the governors of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. The governors say the Army Corps of Engineers’ diversion of trillions of gallons of water from the swollen Mississippi River into the Gulf of Mexico killed fish, shrimp, oysters and crab and forced the extended closure of beaches. Dolphins have suffered high death and infection rates, researchers say. >click to read< 15:44