A NASA Diver/Commercial Fisherman is Among the Cast on CBS Reality Show

Tough As Nails. It takes 12 Americans from all walks of life whose common thread is that they work in tough, gritty jobs — ironworker, firefighter, welder, Marine Corps veteran, and more. They will compete both as individuals and on teams to win cash and prizes, with one of them ultimately being crowned the Tough As Nails champion. One of the competitors is Callie Cattell, a 28-year-old from Bend, Oregon, who spends her time working as a commercial fisherman in the frigid waters off the Alaskan coast. But in addition to that harrowing job, Cattell is also a diver for NASA. video>click to read< 10:34

1 dead, 2 rescued after boat capsizes near China Poot Bay

One person is dead and another two were rescued Wednesday from the waters of Kachemak Bay by commercial fishermen and a surfer when their boat capsized near the mouth of China Poot Bay.,, The crew of the Casino took two males on board, including the one being given CPR by Tillion. The Casino is faster and was able to get them back to the harbor more quickly, Hollis said. “Everybody responded very well,” Hollis said of Tillion, Linegar and his deckhand. Crew from the F/V Captain Cook, captained by Malcom Milne, brought the third person back to the harbor. >click to read< 09:23

Bob Guzzo Talks Quotas, Offshore Wind, Coronavirus, and Fishing out of Stonington, Connecticut

“We’re giving up traditional fishing grounds that we’ve had for hundreds of years, that have fed the country, that are now going to light a light bulb and it’s not going to be worthwhile,” Guzzo said of the proposed wind farms located in federal waters. The location of the wind farms also destroys longtime fisheries, said Guzzo. “They’re taking away places that we’ve fished for this country over hundreds of years and we’re losing that ground,” he said.,, Quotas and Coronavirus, “I got tired of throwing fish overboard, I could never stand it. I started too long ago and never had to do this. The way they make you fish today is a crime,” >click to read< 08:01

Crab fisherman files cease-and-desist against fiber-optic surveyors

The world’s longest fiber-optic cable may be coming to Eureka, but crab fishermen say ships associated with the project have disrupted what’s left of this year’s crabbing season. But longtime crab fisherman Ken Bates filed a cease-and-desist order this week against the survey ships, saying their presence threatens to destroy Dungeness crab gear, or worse, displace gear far into the ocean, where it could entangle whales and prompt the state to sanction the coastal industry.  >click to read< 19:43

Bristol Bay Fisheries Report: July 7, 2020

We have the first million-fish catch day in the bay! Egegik harvested 1 million and 30 thousand fish, and the Naknek-Kvichak district and the Nushagak both had harvests over 950,000.  The total run across the bay jumped by 4 million fish yesterday, to 15.5 million fish. With respect to Egegik’s big catch yesterday, Egegik management biologist Aaron Tiernan had this to say in an email, “Wow! That was impressive. Based on Port Moller, there is still a good amount of fish to come.”,, A boat sinks in the Nushagak district.,, “I have never picked so much fish in my life in one opener” – Nushagak drifter describes a big opener. >click to read< 14:13

Inadequate Assessment by DFO Leaves Harvesters with Rollover for 2020 Cod Catch Limits

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) announced the management plan for northern cod yesterday evening, revealing a rollover in the total allowable catch from last year. The rollover is a result of an inadequate assessment that failed to take into account important data as well as harvester observations – the result of which will have dire impacts on an already suffering inshore fishery. “ A rollover for this year’s quota is completely unacceptable and must be reconsidered by DFO before the season opens,” says Keith Sullivan, FFAW-Unifor President.>click to read< 13:29

DFO‘s Lack of a Full Assessment Leads to a Roll-over in the Allowable Harvest of the Stewardship Cod Fishery for 2020 – The Newfoundland and Labrador Groundfish Industry Development Council (NL-GIDC) believes that the rollover in the allowable harvest for the 2J3KL Cod Stewardship fishery is somewhat disappointing but not surprising. >click to read<

Newport restores water to commercial users – Fishing industry expresses gratitude

As part of the city of Newport’s declared water emergency, production at fish processing plants on the Bayfront had been halted. This action was taken because the city could not supply its industrial users with water,,, “There were financial losses and disruption in the fishing community when this happened, but we got though it.” Steele said the water-related restrictions and closures have been just one of many very different challenges this industry has had to face in the last few months. “It’s a resilient industry. We took a hit, but we kept the fishery up and running,” she said.  >click to read< 12:46

Athearn Marine Agency Boat of the Week: 97′ Longliner with Permits, (2) 425 HP Cummins KT-19s, (2) Cummins Lima – 60 KW Gensets

To review specifications, and information, >click here<  Vessel is in good condition. Longline – Hydraulic spool reportedly holds approximately 50 miles of monofilament line, more,,, To see all the boats in this series, >click here<11:17

Kingfish Zeeland seeks state permit to draw and discharge seawater for $110M fish farm proposed in Jonesport

Kingfish Zeeland, which has an agreement to develop a 94-acre site on Dun Garvan Road, east of central Jonesport on Route 187, needs approval from the state Department of Environmental Protection to draw and discharge seawater between the land-based plant and Chandler Bay. The company says it plans to filter and cool the water that is discharged into the bay to make sure it is clean and that it does not affect the water temperature in the bay, where many local lobstermen set their traps.,, Kingfish officials said Tuesday that the discharge permit will be “one of the most critical permits” for the project. The company also is expected to apply for permits from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and from the Jonesport planning board, which it will need to get prior to starting construction, possibly in 2021. >click to read< 09:48

Fishers have elected to limit quotas for Blue Crab and Rock Lobster in SA

Primary Industries and Regional Development Minister Tim Whetstone said the two revised plans will see fishers make short term sacrifices to allow crab and lobster populations to grow for the long-term benefit of all fishers, seafood consumers and the environment. “The government is committed to growing SA’s seafood industry and ensuring we have sustainable fish stocks for future generations,” he said. “There has been strong growth in Blue Crab and Southern Rock Lobster populations as a result of our fishers’ sustainable practices. >click to read< 09:29

Honolulu mayor announces new ‘fish-to-dish’ program to help Hawaii’s struggling fishing industry

“We have an incredible longline fishing industry,” said Caldwell during a news conference at Pier 38, “and local fishermen who go out every day in grueling conditions, catching fish and bringing it back to feed our residents and visitors.” But the longline fishing industry has lost an estimated $10 million, or about 60% in revenue, since mid-March lockdowns went into effect due to the pandemic, Caldwell said. In an effort to help, he said the city is committing $2.6 million in federal coronavirus funds to help the fishing industry get back on its feet. The “fish-to-dish” program will work in partnership with the Hawaii Longline Association, the United Fishing Agency, which runs the fish auction, and Hawaii Seafood Council to distribute fish to the community.>click to read< 08:23

‘Home and Dry’: Fishing crews urged to turn the tide on industry’s safety record

The campaign comes as many fishing crews across the UK are returning to sea following weeks of lockdown and challenging market conditions to sell their catch. Created with support from the fishing industry, it focuses on the importance of community and home for those who make a living from catching fish. It shines a light on the pride and professionalism of the industry as a way to get vital out messages about good safety at sea. Dave Driver, a skipper featured in the campaign, says: “I’ve been a fisherman for most of my life, and as a vessel owner I am constantly thinking about my safety and the safety of my crew. >click to read< 07:30

The 2020 P.E.I. spring lobster season that almost didn’t happen because of coronavirus, comes to an end

The spring lobster season on P.E.I. ended July 4 after a late start on May 15, in a year when fishermen faced low prices and catch limits due to a shortage of labour in processing plants. After losing the crucial first two weeks of the season, fishermen saw a glut of lobsters, pulling in more than buyers would take. There are eight processing plants on Prince Edward Island that deal with lobster. “At the end of the day, we had a season. That meant job creation and it also meant wealth creation for the province during a time when a lot of the other sectors were suffering,” >click to read< 19:30

As Jaws reaches its 45th – 45 Things About Jaws You Might Not Know

As we celebrate the 45-year anniversary of the movie that changed the summer blockbuster, or in this case the movie that actually invented the summer blockbuster, Jaws. These 45 interesting facts about Jaws will be in no particular order. One of the great things about Jaws is that it was filmed on location and not in a studio. They hired hundreds of local extras and many local actors to fill the roles. The medical inspector who lists the Chrissie  Watkins death as a boating accident; the young Cassidy, who passes out before he can go skinny-dipping with Chrissie Watkins; the fishermen who lose their holiday roast while on the dock and so many others were all real local Martha’s Vineyard residents. The beer brand that Quint drinks aboard the Orca is called Narragansett. It was a popular beer in places like Rhode Island and New England and at one time was a sponsor of the Boston Red Sox.>click to read< 18:27

Study: Microplastic fiber pollution harms lobster larvae

A study published in the Marine Pollution Bulletin reports that the fibers affect the animals’ feeding and respiration, and they could even prevent some larvae from reaching adulthood. “Lobsters play a fundamental role in the Gulf of Maine ecosystem as well as the state’s economy, and it is important that we understand how pollutants impact their development.” Young lobsters grow to adulthood through four distinct developmental stages, and the researchers found that the physiology of each stage determined how the animals interacted with plastic fibers. The youngest lobsters didn’t consume them—but they were plagued by fibers accumulating under the shells that protect their gills. >click to read< 16:04

Bristol Bay Fisheries Report: July 6, 2020

The run is late this year, but it’s ramping way up across the bay. The total run passed 11 million fish yesterday, with some of the biggest harvests we’ve seen yet this season in 3 of the bay’s districts.  Total run in the bay jumped by over 3 million fish yesterday, to almost 11.5 million. Total catch bay-wide is 8.4 million, total escapement is 2.5 million, and there are an estimated 515,000 fish in-river in the bay’s combined rivers. Fish per delivery from the drift boats also jumped by an average of 500 fish per delivery bay-wide. All the districts that fished yesterday delivered more than 1,100 fish per delivery yesterday, and in Ugashik… that number was almost 2,000 fish per delivery. audio, report, >click to read< 14:39

U.S. Crustacean Market to hit $10.2 billion by 2026

The U.S. is among the biggest markets for seafood & seafood-based products and it is ever-growing due to its inherent health benefits. The growth of the seafood demand is attributed to high disposable incomes and an exponential growth of omnichannel partners. E-commerce platforms and digital distribution channels have significantly escalated the seafood market in both formats including business-to-business as well as business-to-customer operations. Many retail giants such as Walmart and Target etc. engaged in the industry has been increasing the presence on these channels to reach out to more customers and deliver high-quality & fresh products. This trend is redefining the supply chain distribution of consumer products in the region. As a result of these marketing efforts, more people are buying or preferring seafood, which will support the growth of crustaceans. >click to read< 14:09

Fisherman talks shrimping season coming to close

Louisiana fisherman Bobby Rivere says the brown shrimp season is coming to a close this evening, and the white shrimp season won’t start up until mid-August. “This gives the white shrimp time to grow. We don’t catch them too prematurely because right now they’ll be too small for consumption,” he said. The white shrimp may be smaller right now because of our mild winter. “We really don’t know why they are so small, they are late moving and with winter not being too cold they aren’t growing properly I guess,” Rivere said. >click to read< 11:01

Inspector of marine accidents and ex-commercial fisherman Sean Friday shares his views on the challenges facing commercial fishing and his journey to the MAIB.

To mark this year’s Maritime Safety Week and the launch of the Home and Dry Campaign by the Fishing Industry Safety Group, Sean Friday, an inspector of marine accidents for 8 years, talks candidly about his journey to the MAIB and what can be done to make commercial fishing safer. Tell us about your career to date and your journey to the MAIB? Although I had always wanted to go to sea, on my father’s insistence my career began with an engineering apprenticeship as a civilian in the British Army. With this providing a good grounding I went to sea as a deckhand in the fishing industry and progressed to the role of skipper of one the UK’s largest fishing vessels. >click to read< 09:39

Most of R.I.’s calamari catch is processed in China. A local group wants to change that.

Also known as loligo, squid is Rhode Island’s most valuable fishery, worth about $28 million a year. More than 22 million pounds of squid are landed each year, most of it at the port of Galilee. But while the official appetizer of the Ocean State may arrive at a fishing port just a few miles away, most squid is shipped to the other side of the world, and all the way back again, before anyone gets to eat it. “One of the reasons that food policy councils exist, and there are some 350 food policy councils around the country, is to promote the growth and strength of local food systems,” she said. >click to read< 08:48

Bristol Bay Fisheries Report: July 5, 2020

The total harvest for the bay is around 1.2 million, as of yesterday. Taking a look across the bay, the total run is at around 8.5 million. The numbers seem to be picking up on the eastside again. The Nushagak district’s daily harvest was 165,000 yesterday, bringing the season’s harvest to 2.6 million. That was harvested 4% by Igushik set-netters, 26% from Nushagak set netters, and 70% from drifters. In the full Nushagak district, daily escapement was 36,800 yesterday. That makes the total escapement across the Nushagak district 1,056,000 Breaking that down by river system… audio, >click to read/listen< 14:57

The Fisheries Bill has passed the House of Lords.

The legislation, which creates the powers for the UK to operate as an independent coastal state and manage its fish stocks sustainably outside the EU, has been introduced to the House of Commons for its First Reading.The Bill ends current automatic rights for EU vessels to fish in British waters. If access to UK waters for foreign vessels is negotiated, the Bill will also enable the Fisheries Administrations to ensure that foreign vessels follow the same rules as UK vessels. >click to read< 12:50

Seismic surveying off Newfoundland and Labrador could bring lasting effects to fish

Seismic surveying happening in Newfoundland and Labrador this year is leaving researchers and fish harvesters concerned over the health of fish and catch rates in the province’s waters. Seismic activity in the province is being carried out by Petroleum Geo-Services (PGS), with projects in Labrador, eastern Newfoundland and off of the Grand Banks. Weilgart said fish can also be harmed in other ways as a result of seismic surveying. She said  damage done by seismic surveying could lead to reflexes and immunity systems being compromised for long periods of time, which can make them more susceptible to predators. “Sometimes these [effects] are four months [after a survey], sometimes even a year, these impacts persist a year after the seismic survey ended,” she said. >click to read< 10:52

The USCG’s First Superstorm: The Great Galveston Hurricane

In early September of 1900, a hurricane of massive force struck the Gulf Coast west of Galveston, Texas. The Great Galveston Hurricane would prove far deadlier than any man-made, environmental or weather-related disaster in U.S. history, with approximately 8,000 killed in Galveston and roughly 2,000 more lost in other parts of the Gulf Coast. This death toll is greater than the combined casualty figure for the 1941 Pearl Harbor attack, Hurricane Katrina, the 9/11 terrorist attacks as well as Hurricane Ike, which struck Galveston in 2008. >click to read< 09:15

America Needs To Stop Relying On Countries Like China For Seafood Markets

When Americans visit a supermarket and wander past the meat counter, they see this century’s equivalent of the fishmonger’s stall: the seafood department. Laden over crushed ice in glass cases sits an array of fish products — whole snapper or shrimp, maybe, but almost always pre-sliced filets in a bevy of hues. Oysters and clams complete the display. In the rare cases where stores divulge the provenance of seafood, placards will often list Thailand, China or South American countries. Less frequently, however, will one see U.S-raised or caught seafood in such displays. This is disappointing to the patriot who wishes to ‘buy American.’ >clickto read< 07:00

New analysis shows seismic risks related to Pebble Mine

New analysis commissioned by Bristol Bay fishermen contends that plans for the Pebble mine project and environmental review do not adequately account for seismic risks on the proposed mine site, putting the fishery and regional communities and cultures as risk for devastation. With the U.S Army Corps of Engineers expected to release its record of decision on a critical permit application for the mine in mid-July, concerns remain with fishermen and others opposed to the mine abutting the Bristol Bay watershed over seismic and other risks outlined in the report produced by Lynker Technologies, in Boulder, Colo. >click to read< 18:06

Michael Shellenberger: Sorry, But I Cried Wolf on Climate Change – A Mea Culpa

If climate change is a problem, then wind turbines and solar panels aren’t a solution: heavily subsidised and unreliable wind and solar are an economic and environmental disaster. When climate alarmists managed to hijack energy (and with it economic) policy it was a case of lunatics (Offshore Wind  Farmers, politicians)taking over the asylum. Last week, Michael Shellenberger hit the headlines with a heart-felt mea culpa, the foundation for which is laid out in his latest work, ‘Apocalypse Never: Why Environmental Alarmism Hurts Us All’. At 459 pages it’s a thoroughly researched piece of academic work that can’t be easily dismissed or ignored; as a grand and exhaustive effort to expose the fanciful and far-fetched claims being made about a planet on the brink it’s had a perfectly predictable result. >click to read< 16:38

Five rescued after fishing vessel Exploits Navigator sinks – Canadian Coast Guard credits EPIRB

Early Thursday morning the Canadian Coast Guard Marine Communications and Traffic Services station in Port aux Basques received a distress call that the 40-foot fishing vessel Exploits Navigator had run aground in Trinity Bay. Five people were onboard. They abandoned the vessel and took to a life raft. They were rescued by the Coast Guard vessel Sacred Bay and taken to Hickman’s Harbour in good health. The Canadian Coast Guard credits an Emergency Position Indicating Radiobeacon (EPIRB) with helping them locate the life raft. >click to read< 11:44

Trump Memo On Lobster Aid Leaves Industry Wondering What’s Next. How about a U.S.Fish Bill?!!

In a memo, the president urged Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue to consider taking appropriate action “to provide assistance to fisherman and producers in the U.S. lobster industry that continue to be harmed by China’s retaliatory tariffs.” He also asked the secretary to consider including lobster and other segments of the seafood industry in future assistance to mitigate the effects of the tariffs. But none have heard details on what Perdue might do to offset the impact on the industry of Trump’s trade war with China. The U.S. Department of Agriculture is also mostly quiet. >click to read< 10:01 – A reminder from Sam Parisi to those interested in creating and implementing a U.S. Fish Bill – Greetings to all commercial fishermen, fish processors, equipment suppliers, politicians, and citizens, that are interested and supportive of creation of the U.S. Fish Bill. >click to read< 10:06

Could this, like spot prawns, be our next local seafood success? The hake catch is six times the size for wild salmon.

B.C.’s hake, also known as Pacific whiting or Merluccius productus, is a transboundary species that crosses Canadian and American waters. Both countries share management of the short-lived, bountiful species under a joint fishery treaty. “Their stock is healthy,” said Bruce Turris, executive manager of the Canadian Groundfish Research and Conservation Society. Turris, who represents the hake fishery on the joint management treaty and has worked with hake for more than 35 years, notes that Canada only harvested around 60 per cent of its total allowable catch in 2019. “We’re still not fully utilizing the resource,” he says. But “it’s not a resource that’s easily accessible,” said Turris, citing a steep investment requirement into the fishery. >click to read< 08:43